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THE 

LABOUR 

Gazette 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 

INDEX 

VOLUME LXIV 

FOR THE YEAR 

1964 



Minister — Hon. Allan J. MacEachen 
Deputy Minister — George V. Haythorne Editor — William S. Drinkwater 



ROGER DUHAMEL. F.R.S.C. 
QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 
OTTAWA, 1965 
96425—1 






PAGE NUMBERS OF MONTHLY EDITIONS 

Month 

1- 91 January 

94- 180 February 

182- 256 March 

258- 352 April 

354- 456 May 

458- 540 June 

542- 636 July 

638- 764 August 

766- 844 September 

846- 932 October 

934-1048 November 

1050-1164 December 



ERRATA 

On page 7 — Column 5 — under "Previous Year" — Line 6 — for —2.1 read +2.1 

On page 9 — Table 1 — under "Manufacturing — Transportation equipment — Membership — 
for 72,300 read 71,300. 

On page 9— Table 1— footnote (t) for March 1962 read March 1963. 

On page 12— Table 3— footnote (t) for March 1962 read March 1963. 

On page 13— Table 4— footnote (t) for March 1962 read March 1963. 

On page 315 — "Monthly Report on Operation of Unemployment Insurance Act — Line 1 
of subhead — for 51 read 15. 

On page 435 — Column 9 — opposite "synthetic textiles and silk" — for 7.13 read 70.13. 

On page 848— Column 1— Para. 1— Line 3— for 11,500 read 1,500. 



M 



R y 

OCT -61965 

/| 3 V ^/ry of 

1012743 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



AFL-CIO 

CB 

CCA 

CCC 

CLC 

CMA 

CNTU 

CO 

IAPA 

IAPES 

IBEW 

ILO 

NES 

OECD 

SIU 

UAW 



American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. 

Conciliation Board. 

Canadian Construction Association. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce. 

Canadian Labour Congress. 

Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 

Confederation of National Trade Unions. 

Conciliation Officer. 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations. 

International Association of Personnel in Employment Security. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. 

International Labour Organization. 

National Employment Service. 

Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. 

Seafarers' International Union. 

United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of 
America, International Union. 



USWA 



United Steelworkers of America. 



INDEX 



A 



A and H Express Lines Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 288; granted, 395. 

Accident Prevention 

Leeson, Stanley, Accident Prevention and Com- 
pensation Branch, federal Department of La- 
bour, sent to Special Commonwealth Africa 
Aid Program (SCAAP), 272. 

Statistics, IAPA (Ontario), 375. 

Accidents, Industrial See also International 
Labour Organization; Workmen's Compen- 
sation 

Chief Inspector of Factories, annual report 
(1962). BRITAIN: 476. 

IAPA (Ontario), statistics, 375. 

Industrial fatalities. CANADA: (1963), 374. 
first and second quarters (1964), 560, 862. 
third and fourth quarters (1963), 28, 273. 

Statistics: "H — Industrial Accidents" (quarterly 
and annual feature). 

Adams, Dr. R. M., Canadian Labour Attache, 
Belgium 
Appointment, 98. 

Agence Maritime Inc. 
Certification applications: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.: 988; 
representation vote, 1106. 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 878; rep- 
resentation vote, 1106. 

Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 878. 

Seafarers; marine engineers; 1107; with- 
drawn, 1108. 

Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: 877; repre- 
sentation vote, 1105. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.: 
licensed personnel: representation vote, 
1106. 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: repre- 
sentation vote, 1106. 

Aging See also Older Workers 

Conference on Aging, 17th annual, University 

of Michigan, 664. 
Living accommodation for the elderly — changes 

in legislation, 1963. CANADA: 784. 
Special Committee of the Senate on Aging — 

brief, federal Department of Labour, 790. 

Agreements See Collective Labour Agreements 
Air Canada 

Certification application: 

Machinists: 798; granted, 876. 
Dispute: 

Machinists: C. O. appointed, 805; C. B. fully 
constituted, 990. 

Air Line Dispatchers' Association, Canadian 
Certification application: 

Cubana Airlines Limited: 129; granted, 213. 
Dispute: 

Cubana Airlines Limited: CO. appointed, 289; 

settlement, 397. 
96425—2 



Air Line Flight Attendants' Association, Ca- 
nadian 
Disputes: 

Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited: CO. 

appointed, 717. 
TransAir Limited: settlement, 289. 

Air Line Pilots' Association, Canadian 
Disputes: 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 131; settlement, 575. 
Pacific Western Airlines (I.F.R. and V.F.R. 
Divisions): CO. appointed, 40; settlement, 
131. 

Trans Air Limited: CO. appointed, 495. 
Intervener, certification applications: 
Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited 

(pilots and co-pilots): granted, 286. 
TransAir Limited: rejected, 988 

Air Pollution 
Railway Brotherhoods, views, 20. 

Airline Pilots Association, Maritime 
Certification applications: 

Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited 

(operations personnel) : 214; granted, 286. 

Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited 

(pilots and co-pilots): 214; granted, 286. 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company 
Certification application : 

Locomotive Engineers: granted, 127; repre- 
sentation vote, 127; rejected, 213. 
Disputes : 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 
Railroad Trainmen: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 289. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen: repre- 
sentation vote, 127; rejected, 213. 

Alitalia Airlines 

Certification application: 
Automobile Workers: 878; granted, 986. 

Allied Building Service Limited 
Certification application: 

Machinists: 396; granted, 493. 

American Federation of Labor — Congress of 
Industrial Organizations 

"Automation", address, John I. Snyder, Jr., 
President and Chairman, Board of U.S. In- 
dustries, Inc., at AFL-CIO convention, 99. 

Convention, biennial, 24. 

Maritime Trades Department, convention, 27. 

American Newspaper Guild 
Certification application: 

Canadian Broadcasting Company: requests for 
review, 39. 
Dispute : 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: CO. 
appointed, 805; C.B. appointed, 990 



VI 



INDEX 



Annuities 

Annual report (1963), Annuities Branch, federal 

Department of Labour, 542. 
Canadian government annuities, change in 
interest rates, 461. 

Apartheid 
ILO, proposed program against, 208. 

Apprenticeship 

Alta. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 810. 

CCA meeting, Apprenticeship Training Com- 
mittee, 191. 

Federal-provincial Labour Conference, proceed- 
ings, 264. 

N.B. Tradesmen's Qualifications Act: regula- 
tions, 862. 

Nfld. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 310, 810. 

Ont. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 311. 

Ont. Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act (1964): provisions, 859. 

Sask. Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act: regulations, 312, 412. 

Appropriation Acts 

Older Worker Employment and Training In- 
centive Program Regulations, 52. 

Arbitration 

Alta. Supreme Court upholds complete freedom 
in appointing firm's representative to arbitra- 
tion board, 807. 

B.C. Court of Appeal finding no error on face 
of arbitration award, dismisses application to 
set aside, 723. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules arbitration board 
should hear evidence on honouring of picket 
lines, 138. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules that once arbitrator has 
made his award he cannot change it sub- 
stantially, 808. 

CLC convention resolution re government em- 
ployees, 474. 

Ont. High Court holds that means to enforce 
arbitration award are available, refuses injunc- 
tion, 307. 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1074. 

Argosy Carriers (Eastern) Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 1107; withdrawn, 1108. 

Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc. 
Dispute: 
Teamsters: CO. appointed, 131; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 215; C.B. fully constituted, 289; 
C.B. report, 720; strike action after Board 
procedure, 718; settlement, 806. 

Associated Non-Operating Unions 
Disputes: 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company: C.B. appointed, 289; C.B. fully 
constituted, 398; C.B. report, 576; settle- 
ment, 805. 



Canadian National Railways: C.B. appointed, 

289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; C.B. report, 

576; settlement, 805. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company: C.B. ap- 

appointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 

C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 
Cumberland Railway Company (Sydney and 

Louisburg Division): C.B. appointed, 289; 

C.B. fully constituted, 398; C.B. report, 576; 

settlement, 805. 
Midland Railway Company of Manitoba: 

C.B. appointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 

398; C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 
Ontario Northland Railway: C.B. appointed, 

289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; C.B. re- 
port, 576; settlement, 805. 
Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway: C.B. 

appointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 

C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Association of Employees of CJMS Radio 
Montreal Limited 
Certification application: 
CJMS Radio Montreal: 1107. 

Association of Employees of M and P Trans- 
port Limited 
Dispute: 

M and P Transport Limited: CO. appointed, 
1108. 

Association of International Representatives 
of the Building and Construction Trades 
Joint brief, federal Cabinet, 186. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 
Dispute: 

Canadian Labour Congress: settlement, 40. 

Australia 

On working women, 34. 

Auto Workers 
Certification applications: 
Alitalia Airlines: 878; granted, 986. 
Charron, Marc (application for revocation): 

214; granted, 288. 
Compagnie Nationale Air France (applica- 
tion for revocation): 214; granted, 288. 
Chrysler — UAW 3-year agreement, 850. 
Dispute: 

British Overseas Airways Corporation: CO. 
appointed, 495; settlement, 717. 

Automation 

"Automation", address, John I. Snyder, Jr., 
President and Chairman, Board of U.S. In- 
dustries, Inc., at AFL-CIO convention, 99. 
CLC, views, 467. 

Continuing education — facilities for people likely 
to be affected by technological changes. 
CANADA: 870. 

Effects of technological change on collective bar- 
gaining and on role of government in labour- 
management relations — address, George S. 
Saunders, federal Department of Labour, to 
16th Dominion-Provincial Conference on coal, 
851. 



INDEX 



VII 



Few retraining programs successful — study of 
effects of automation. UNITED STATES: 770. 

Impact and Implications of Office Automation — 
Occasional Paper No. 1, Economics and 
Research Branch, federal Department of 
Labour, 645. 

ILO Conference on Employment Problems of 
Automation and Advanced Technology — Inter- 
national Institute for Labour Statistics, 713. 

Railway Brotherhoods commend Government 
action, 19. 

Technological Changes in the Railway Indus- 
try, Maritime Area of CNR, 1948-60, federal 
Department of Labour, 1081. 

Technological development and a "human scrap 
heap" — remarks of U.S. Secretary of Labor, 
W. Willard Wirtz, 545. 

Autonomy See Labour Unions 



B 



Bacon, H. W., Limited 
Dispute : 
Teamsters: CO. appointed, 882; C.B. apr 
pointed, 1109. 

Banks, Hal C, President, Seafarers' International 
Union of Canada 
Removal by Board of Trustees, Maritime Trans- 
portation Unions, 260. 

Barkwell, Floyd 

Certification application: 

Teamsters: application for revocation, 1107. 

Baton Broadcasting Limited 
Certification application : 

Television and Radio Artists: 39; granted, 213. 
Dispute: 
Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 131; 
settlement, 575. 

Beaucage, Jos. 

Certification application: 
Seafarers: application for revocation, 288; 
granted, 395. 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada 
Disputes : 

Office employees: CO. appointed, 289; settle- 
ment, 496. 
Traffic employees: CO. appointed, 40; settle- 
ment, 40. 

Berven Enterprises Limited 
Certification application: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
716; withdrawn, 717; granted, 797; 798. 

Blindness Allowances 

Statistics. CANADA: 262, 463, 770, 1054. 

Board of Employees of John Kron and Son 
Limited 
Certification application: 

John Kron and Son Limited: application for 

revocation, 397; representation vote, 493. 
96425— 21 



Boilers 

B.C. Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act: amend- 
ment, 963; regulations, 889. 
Nfld. Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act (1959): 
regulations, 141. 

Boston and Rockland Transportation Company 
Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 988. 

Bray, John L. 

Certification application: 
Teamsters: rejected, 127. 

British Columbia Air Lines Limited 
Dispute : 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
CO. appointed, 215; settlement, 398. 

British Columbia Telephone Company 
Certification applications : 

Communications Workers: 39; withdrawn, 

129. 
Federation of Telephone Workers of British 
Columbia: 798. 
Dispute: 

Federation of Telephone Workers of British 
Columbia: CO. appointed, 805. 

British Columbia Towboat Owners' Association 
Disputes: 
Canadian Merchant Service Guild Inc.: CO. 

appointed, 990; C.B. appointed, 1109. 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 

engineer officers: CO. appointed, 990; C.B. 

appointed, 1109. 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 

various companies: CO. appointed, 990; 

CB. appointed, 1109. 
Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

British Economic Council See National Eco- 
nomic Development Council 

British Overseas Airways Corporation 
Dispute : 
Auto Workers: CO. appointed, 495; settle- 
ment, 717. 

Broadcast Employees and Technicians, Na- 
tional Association of 
Certification applications: 

Byers, Ian (et al.): application for revocation, 
39; representation vote, 287. 

Canadian Marconi Company: request for re- 
view, 288; granted, 396. 

Central Ontario Television Limited: 288; 
granted, 395. 

Channel Seven Television Limited: request for 
review, 1108. 

Colonial Broadcasting Company (Station 
VOCM) : 129; granted, 213. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Corporation 
Company Limited: application for revoca- 
tion, 39; representation vote, 287; applica- 
tion for revocation granted, 494. 

Maple Leaf Broadcasting Company Limited: 
granted, 127. 



VIII 



INDEX 



Niagara Television Limited: withdrawn, 575. 

Rempel, Peter: request for review, 1108. 

Western Ontario Broadcasting Company, Lim- 
ited: 988; granted, 1105. 
Disputes: 

Baton Broadcasting Limited: CO. appointed, 
131; settlement, 575. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: C.B. re- 
port, 290; settlement, 289. 

Canadian Marconi Company: CO. appointed, 
495. 

CJMS Radio Montreal Limitee: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; C.B. appointed, 882; C.B. 
fully constituted, 990. 

Colonial Broadcasting Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; settlement, 805. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Company 
Limited: CO. appointed, 131. 

Maple Leaf Broadcasting Company Limited: 
CO. appointed, 397; C.B. appointed, 576; 
C.B. fully constituted, 717; C.B. report, 
1109. 

Radio Futura Limited: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 496. 

Radio Laurentides Inc.: CO. appointed, 717; 
settlement, 805. 

Radio Saguenay Limitee (CKRS-CKRS-TV) : 
CO. appointed, 397; Minister refused to 
appoint C.B., 1109. 

Radio Station CHRC Limitee: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 131; C.B. fully constituted, 215. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Marconi Company: 715. 

Brown, A. H., Chairman, Canada Labour Rela- 
tions Board 
Appointment, 184. 
Brown and Ryan Limited 
Dispute: 
Longshoremen: settlement, 40. 

Building Industry See Construction Industry 
Buntain Bell and Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Labourers' Protective Union: CO. appointed, 
495; settlement, 575. 

Byers, Ian (et ah) 

Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: application for revoca- 
tion, 39; representation vote, 287; applica- 
tion for revocation granted, 494. 



CJMS Radio Montreal Limitee 
Dispute: 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 717; 
C.B. appointed, 882; C.B. fully constituted, 
990. 
Canada Labour Relations Board 

Brown, A. H., chairman, appointment, 184. 
Certification and Other Proceedings before the 
Canada Labour Relations Board (monthly 
feature). 
Canada Labour (Standards) Code 
Introduced in Commons, 1058. 



Man. Court of Queen's Bench dismisses appli- 
cation to quash Canada Labour Relations 
Board's certification order, 885. 

Canada Pension Plan See Pensions 

Canada Shipping Act 

Crew Accommodation Regulations, 592. 

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Regulations, 503. 

Canada Southern Railway 
Certification application: 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen: repre- 
sentation vote, 987. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Locomotive Engineers: representation vote, 
987. 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited 
Certification application: 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: 575; granted, 
715. 
Dispute: 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: CO. ap- 
pointed, 495; C.B. appointed, 805; C.B. 
fully constituted, 882. 

Canada Students Loans Act 
Regulations, 1001. 

Canada Year Book 

1963-64 edition, DBS, 261. 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 
Disputes: 

Canadian Guards Association: CO. appointed, 

397; settlement, 496. 
Operating Engineers: CO. appointed, 575; 

settlement, 576. 
Steelworkers: CO. appointed, 131. 

Canadian Association of Administrators of 
Labour Legislation 
Conference, 23rd, 947. 
Canadian British Aluminium Company Limited 
Certification application: 

National Syndicate of Employees of Alu- 
minium of Baie Comeau: 396; granted, 493. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Certification applications : 

American Newspaper Guild: request for re- 
view, 39. 

Radio and Television Employees: request for 
review, 1108. 

Theatrical Stage Employees: 716. 

Disputes: 

American Newspaper Guild: CO. appointed, 
805; C.B. appointed, 990. 

Broadcast Employees: C.B. report, 290; settle- 
ment, 289. 

Radio and Television Employees: settlement, 
215. 

Theatrical Stage Employees: CO. appointed, 
215; C.B. appointed, 882; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 990. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce 

Briefs, federal Government, 22, 1090. 
Meeting, 35th, 1083. 



INDEX 



IX 



Canadian Conference on the Family 

Meeting, Governor-General and Madame Vanier, 
567. 

Canadian Construction Association 

Brief, federal Government, 373. 

Government measures to encourage training, 
winter work, lauded by President, 393. 

Joint brief, federal Cabinet, 185. 

Meeting, 46th, 190. 

"Multi-Trade Bargaining and Provincial Agree- 
ments", address, William Ladyman, IBEW, 
to CCA annual meeting, 192. 

Canadian Dredge and Dock Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Canadian Freightways Limited 
Certification application: 

Office Employees: 128; granted, 213. 

Canadian Government Annuities See Annuities 
Canadian Great Western Express Limited 
Certification application : 
Teamsters: 715; granted, 715. 

Canadian Guards Association 
Dispute: 

Canadian Arsenals Limited: CO. appointed, 
397; settlement, 496. 

Canadian Labour Congress 

ARTEC, affiliation, 644. 

Brief, federal Cabinet, 14. 

Convention, 5th, 464. 

Dispute: 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited: settle- 
ment, 40. 

Goldenberg, Carl, OBE, QC, permanent impar- 
tial umpire of jurisdictional disputes, appoint- 
ment, 768. 

History, trade union movement in Canada, Dr. 
Eugene Forsey, Director, Research Depart- 
ment, 5. 

Jenoves, William, general Vice-President, death 
of, 848. 

Jodoin, Claude, President: convention address, 
468; Labour Day message, 640; New Year 
message, 1056. 

Ladyman, William, general Vice-President, 937. 

MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., Minister of Labour: 
convention address, 470; reply to brief, 18. 

Pearson, Rt. Hon. L.B., Prime Minister of 
Canada : convention address, 469; reply to 
brief, 18. 

Scotton, Clifford A., appointment, liaison officer, 

Secretary-Treasurer, Union Label Department, 

644. 
Union Label Trades Department, 4th biennial 

convention, 475. 
Urges progressive shortening of work week and 

other measures to reduce unemployment, 643. 

Canadian Labour (Standards) Code 
Introduced in House of Commons, 1058. 



Canadian Lake Carriers Negotiating Committee 
Disputes: 

Seafarers: 23 companies: CO. appointed, 

717. 
Seafarers: 26 companies: CO. appointed, 
717. 

Canadian Longyear Limited 
Certification application: 

Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers: 798; with- 
drawn, 878. 

Canadian Manufacturers Association 
Corporate profits, 1963, survey, 546. 
Meeting, 93rd, 551. 
Canadian Marconi Company 
Certification applications: 

Broadcast Employees: request for review, 288; 

granted, 396. 
Television and Radio Artists: 574; granted, 
715. 
Disputes: 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 495. 
Marconi Salaried Employees' Association: 
CO. appointed, 805. 
Intervener, certification application 
Broadcast Employees: granted, 715. 

Canadian Marine Officers' Union 
Formation, SIU, 770. 

Canadian Maritime Union 
Certification applications: 

Lakeland Tankers Limited: 715; granted, 715. 
Upper Lakes Shipping Limited: 495; granted, 
573. 

Disputes: 

Trans-Lake Shipping Limited: CO. appointed, 
882. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 882. 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc. 
Certification applications : 

Agence Maritime Inc.: 988. 

Trans-World Chartering Limited: 495; granted, 
573. 
Disputes: 

B.C. Towboat Owners' Association: CO. ap- 
pointed, 990; CB. appointed, 1109. 

Canadian National Railways (Borden-Cape 
Tormentine Ferry Service): CO. appointed, 
575; settlement, 805. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Agence Maritime Inc. (licensed personnel): 
representation vote, 1106. 

Harney Brothers Co. Ltd. (licensed person- 
nel): granted, 1105. 

La Cie de Navigation du Golfe Ltee (licensed 
personnel) : granted, 986. 

Levis Shipping Limited (licensed personnel): 
granted, 1105. 

North Shipping and Transportation Limited: 
withdrawn, 988. 

North Shore Shipping Lines Limited (licensed 
personnel) : granted, 986. 

Polaris Shipping Limited (licensed personnel): 
granted, 986. 



INDEX 



Canadian National Hotels Limited 
Certification application: 

Operating Engineers: Nova Scotian Hotel: 
495; withdrawn, 575. 
Disputes: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
Bessborough Hotel, Saskatoon: CO. ap- 
pointed, 805; C.B. appointed, 1109. 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
Fort Garry Hotel, Winnipeg: CO. ap- 
pointed, 805; C.B. appointed, 1108. 

Canadian National Railways 
Certification applications: 

Railroad Telegraphers: Telecommunications 
Department: granted, 286. 

Railroad Telegraphers: unit of agents, dis- 
patchers and operators, Newfoundland: 
granted, 286. 

Railroad Telegraphers: unit of system em- 
ployees in Canada except Newfoundland: 
granted, 286. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: Unit of em- 
ployees in various clerical and other classifi- 
cations, Newfoundland: granted, 286. 

Co-operative housing project, Toronto, Ont., 

proposed by CNR employees, 378. 
Disputes: 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Commercial Telegraphers' Union: Telecom- 
munications Department and Canadian 
National System, Division 43: CO. ap- 
pointed, 882. 

Locomotive Engineers: Prairie and Mountain 
Regions: CO. appointed, 575; settlement, 
576. 

Merchant Service: Borden-Cape Tormentine 
Ferry Service: CO. appointed, 575; settle- 
ment, 805. 

Police Association: CO. appointed, 289; set- 
tlement, 575; C.B. appointed, 882; C.B. 
fully constituted, 990. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Commercial Telegraphers: agents, dispatchers 
and operators, Newfoundland: granted, 286. 

Commercial Telegraphers: Telecommunica- 
tions Department: granted, 286. 

Commercial Telegraphers: unit of system em- 
ployees in Canada except Newfoundland: 
granted, 286. 

Railroad Telegraphers: unit of employees in 
various clerical and other classifications, 
Newfoundland: granted, 286. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: unit of agents, 
dispatchers and operators, Newfoundland: 
granted, 286. 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
unit of system employees in Canada except 
Newfoundland: granted, 286. 

Sleeping car porters eligible as sleeping car 
conductors or dining car stewards — merger of 
minority groups CNR, 262. 



Canadian National Railways Police Associa- 
tion 
Dispute: 

Canadian National Railways: CO. appointed, 
289; settlement, 575; C.B. appointed, 882; 
C.B. fully constituted, 990. 

Canadian Occupations See Publications 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited 

Disputes: 

Air Line Pilots: CO. appointed, 131; settle- 
ment, 575. 

Flight Attendants: CO. appointed, 717. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
Certification application : 

Railroad Trainmen: Sleeping and parlour car 
conductors: 129; granted, 213. 
Disputes : 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Railroad Trainmen: Dining-car-service em- 
ployees: CO. appointed, 575; settlement, 
805. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: Merchandise 
Services Department, Prairie and Pacific 
Regions: CO. appointed, 40; settlement, 
575. 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
S.S. Princess of Acadia: CO. appointed, 
1108. 

Seafarers: British Columbia Coast Steamship 
Service: CO. appointed, 397; settlement, 
575. 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 
Summary of decisions — Case Nos. 816-821, 297; 

822-823, 406. 
Termination, 371. 

Canadian Television and Radio Artists, Asso- 
ciation of 
Certification applications: 

Baton Broadcasting Limited, 39; granted, 213. 
Canadian Marconi Company: 574; granted, 
715. 

Canadian Union of Employees of Verreault 
Navigation Inc. 
Certification application: 

Verreault Navigation Inc.: 878; rejected, 988. 

Canadian Union of Public Employees 

Certification application: 

Lakehead Harbour Commissioners: 798; rep- 
resentation vote, 876; granted, 986. 

Canadian Vocational Association 
National convention, first, 461. 

Canadian Welfare Council 

National poverty, first concerted study of, 1053. 

Canadian Westinghouse Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Mine Workers: Atomic Fuel Department: 
495; granted, 573. 



INDEX 



XI 



Cargill Grain Company Limited 
Certification application: 
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers: 288; 
granted, 395. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 
Certification application: 

Mine Workers: Domaine Etria and Pavilion 
Mercier projects: granted, 127. 
Dispute: 

Mine Workers: CO. appointed, 289; settle- 
ment, 397. 

Central Ontario Television Limited 
Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: 288; granted, 395. 

Central Truck Lines 
Dispute : 
Teamsters: CO. appointed, 39; CB. appointed, 
131; CB. fully constituted, 216; CB. report, 
722; settlement, 718. 

Certification 
B.C. Supreme Court quashes certification order 

because of Labour Board's failure to act 

judicially, 409. 
Certification and Other Proceedings before the 

Canada Labour Relations Board (monthly 

feature) 
Man. Court of Queen's Bench dismisses appli- 
cation to quash Canada Labour Relations 

Board's certification order, 885. 
Ont. High Court upholds certification order on 

ground that Court has no power to review 

decision, 410. 
P.E.I. Supreme Court quashes certification order 

on ground that local did not qualify as trade 

union, 1125. 
Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1073. 

Channel Seven Television Limited 
Certification application: 
Broadcast Employees: request for review, 
1108. 

Charron, Marc (et al) 
Certification application: 

Auto Workers: application for revocation, 
214; granted, 288. 

Chayer, Albert G. 

Certification application: 

Seafarers: application for revocation, 288; 
granted, 395. 

Chevrier, Hon. Lionel, federal Minister of Justice 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 21. 

Chrysler Corporation 

Chrysler — UAW 3-year agreement, 850. 

Civil Engineering 

ILO Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works Committee, 7th session, 491. 

Civil Rights See Discrimination 

Civil Service 

N.B. Civil Service Act: amendments, 1081. 



Civil Service Association of Canada 
Dispute: 

National Harbours Board (Quebec Harbour 
Police): CO. appointed, 131; settlement, 
496. 

Civilian Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 

CJMS Radio Montreal 
Certification application: 

Association of Employees of CJMS Radio 
Montreal Ltd.: 1107. 

Clarke Steamship Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Steel workers: CO. appointed, 717; settlement, 
805. 

Coal Mining See Mining 

Collective Bargaining 

Bargaining calendar (1965). CANADA: 977. 

CLC convention resolutions, 474. 

Collective action by nurses to improve salaries 

and working conditions. CANADA: 360. 
Collective bargaining. CANADA: 1963 — fourth 

quarter, 118; 1964 — first quarter, 388; second 

quarter, 675; third quarter, 973. 
Collective Bargaining Review. CANADA: 

(monthly feature) 
Duration of negotiations in 1963, 203. 
Effects of technological change on collective 

bargaining and on role of government in 

labour-management relations — address, George 

S. Saunders, federal Department of Labour, 

to 16th Dominion-Provincial Conference on 

Coal, 851. 
Major settlements, first half, 1964, 674; in 1963, 

120; CANADA. 

Collective Labour Agreements 

Chrysler — UAW 3-year agreement, 850. 
Developments (1963). CANADA: 106. 
Kaiser Steel — USW pact broadens vacation plan 

coverage. UNITED STATES: 104, 332, 546. 
Ont. High Court holds employee may sue for 

vacation pay owed him under collective agree- 
ment, 46. 
Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1074. 
Teamsters, trucking industry, first national 

labour contract. UNITED STATES: 97. 
Union shop most popular form union security. 

UNITED STATES: 771. 
Wage increases, 1963. UNITED STATES: 207, 

408. 
Wage settlements, 1964. UNITED STATES: 

874. 

Colonial Broadcasting Company 
Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: 129; granted, 213. 
Dispute : 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 717; 
settlement, 805. 



XII 



INDEX 



Commercial Telegraphers' Union 
Dispute: 

Canadian National Railways: Telecommunica- 
tions Department and Canadian National 
System, Division 43: CO. appointed, 882. 
Intervener, certification applications: 
Canadian National Railways: agents, dis- 
patchers, and operators: granted, 286. 
Canadian National Railways: Telecommuni- 
cations Department: granted, 286. 
Canadian National Railways: unit of system 
employees in Canada except Newfoundland: 
granted, 286. 

Communications Workers of America 
Certification application: 

British Columbia Telephone Company: 39; 
withdrawn, 129. 
Dispute: 

Northern Telephone Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 215; settlement, 289. 

Compagnie Nationale Air France 
Certification application: 
Auto Workers: application for revocation, 
214; granted, 288. 

Compulsory Arbitration See Arbitration 
Conciliation 
Alta. Supreme Court rules members of em- 
ployers' association are separate units for 
conciliation award, 219. 
Conciliation and Other Proceedings before the 

Minister of Labour (monthly feature) 
Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1074. 
Confederation of National Trade Unions 
Brief, federal Cabinet, 270. 
Godin, Jean-Noel, vice-president, 97. 
Marchand, Jean, President: Labour Day mes- 
sage, 641; New Year message, 1056. 
Women workers and the CNTU, 1099. 

Consolidated Aviation Fueling of Toronto 
Limited 
Certification application: 

Machinists: 214; granted, 395. 

Construction Industry See also House Building 
Incentive Program 

Brief to federal Minister of Labour on Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act — submission by As- 
sociation of International Representatives of 
the Building and Construction Trades and the 
Canadian Construction Association, 770. 

Construction industry, labour, join in submission 
to federal Cabinet, 186. 

Construction Technician Course — joint efforts, 
Ontario General Contractors Association and 
Technological and Trades Training Branch, 
Ontario Department of Education, 358. 

ILO Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works Committee, 7th session, 491. 

Man. Construction Industry Wages Act: reg- 
ulations, 1070. 

Survey, National Economic Development Coun- 
cil. BRITAIN: 358. 



Consumer Credit 

CNTU, views, 271. 
Co-operative Housing See Housing 
Cornell University 

Study indicates shorter work week no cure for 
unemployment, 100. 

Corporate Profits See Profits 

Cost of Living 

CNTU, views, 270 

Price Index. CANADA. UNITED STATES. 
BRITAIN: (monthly feature) 

Cronkwright Transport Limited 
Certification application : 

Teamsters: 396; granted, 493. 
Dispute: 

Teamsters: CO. appointed, 717; 882. 

Cubana Airlines Limited 
Certification application: 

Air Line Dispatchers: 129; granted, 213. 
Dispute: 

Air Line Dispatchers: CO. appointed, 289; 
settlement. 397. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Longshoremen: settlement, 40. 

Cumberland Railway Company 
Disputes: 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: Sydney 
and Louisbourg Division: CB. appointed, 
289; CB. fully constituted, 398; CB. report, 
576; settlement, 805. 
Railroad Trainmen: Sydney and Louisburg 
Division: CB. appointed, 1109. 

Currie, R. G., Chief Conciliator, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour 
Retirement, 849. 

Cushing, Gordon G., Assistant Deputy Minister, 
federal Department of Labour 
"Labour Standards", remarks, Federal-Provin- 
cial Labour Conference, 267. 



D 



Denison Mines Limited 
Disputes: 

Steelworkers (District 6) : settlement, CB. 

report, 132. 
Steelworkers (Local 5980): settlement, 215. 

Depressed Areas 

Co-operation to wipe out "islands of poverty" 
urged, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, federal 
Minister of Labour, 936. 

Deuterium of Canada Limited 

Training program, N.S. heavy water plant, 848. 

Deutsch, Dr. John, Chairman, Economic Council 
of Canada 
"Planning for Progress", address, CMA meeting, 
557. 



INDEX 



XIII 



Disabled Persons 

CCC, views, 23. 

Handicapped businessmen successful, 196. 

ILO seminar, "Vocational Rehabilitation of the 
Disabled". 277. 

National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons, 3rd meeting, 547. 

Rehabilitation — An International Concern, 565. 

Rehabilitation and Social Work Seminar, 
sponsored by Saskatchewan Co-ordinating 
Council on Rehabilitation, 277. 

Sheltered employment, expansion. CANADA: 32. 

Vocational rehabilitation services, older disabled 
persons. CANADA: 116. 

Disabled Persons Allowances 

Statistics. CANADA: 262, 463, 770, 1054. 

Disclosure See Pensions 

Discrimination See also Equal Pay for Equal 
Work 

Anti-discrimination legislation (1964). CAN- 
ADA: 939. 

B.C. Fair Employment Practices Act extended 
to include discrimination against older work- 
ers, 943. 

ILO Convention on Discrimination in Employ- 
ment and Occupation — Canada proceeding to 
ratify, 185; approved by Canadian Parliament, 
939. 

Newfoundland— proposed legislation "An Act 
to Provide for Fair Employment Practices", 
943. 

Ontario Human Rights Commission and As- 
sociation of Professional Placement Agencies 
and Consultants sign fair practices agreement 
—Declaration of Equal Employment Op- 
portunity, 643. 

Quebec Act forbids discrimination in employ- 
ment and in trade union membership, 940. 

U.S. Civil Rights Act (1964), provisions, 811, 
944. 

Yukon Territory Fair Practices Ordinance, pro- 
visions, 942. 

Dominion-Provincial Conference on Coal 
Effects of technological change on collective 
bargaining and on role of government in 
labour-management relations — address, George 
S. Saunders, federal Department of Labour 
851. 

Dymond, Dr. W. R., Assistant Deputy Minister 
of Labour 

Co-operates with U.S. experts in preparation of 

study "Manpower Policy and Programmes in 

the United States", 642. 
On establishment of Manpower Consultative 

Service, remarks, Federal-Provincial Labour 

Conference, 265. 



E 



Earnings See Wages and Salaries 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Longshoremen: 288; rejected, 494. 
Dispute: 

Longshoremen: settlement, 40. 

96425—3 



Eastern Canada Stevedoring (1963) Limited 
Certification applications: 

Steelworkers: linesmen: 878. 

Steelworkers: shed employees: 878. 
Dispute: 

Steelworkers: CO. appointed, 805. 

Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited 
Certification applications: 

Airline Pilots, Maritime: operations person- 
• nel: 214. 

Air Line Pilots, Maritime: pilots and co- 
pilots: 214; granted, 286. 

Intervener, certification application: 

Air Line Pilots, Canadian: pilots and co- 
pilots: granted, 286. 

Economic Council of Canada 
Meeting, first project, 96. 
Membership, 4. 

Economic Policy 

"Canada's Investment Capital Requirements" — 
blueprint of what is ahead for Canadian 
economy, Kenneth W. Taylor, special adviser 
to Privy Council Office, address, 62nd Con- 
ference of Canadian Institute of Chartered 
Accountants, 854. 

CLC views, 472. 

Co-operation to wipe out "islands of poverty" 
urged, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, federal 
Minister of Labour, 936. 

Resources of Scientific and Technical Personnel 
in the OECD Area, report, Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development, 
185. 

Economic Stevedoring Corporation 
Dispute : 
Longshoremen: settlement, 40. 

Education 

Continuing education — facilities for people 

likely to be affected by technological changes, 

and married women. CANADA: 870. 
Council on Social Work Education, meeting. 

CANADA, UNITED STATES: 277. 
Drop-out Rates in University Engineering 

Courses, Professional Manpower Bulletin No. 

3, federal Department of Labour, 29. 

OFL Education Conference, 193. 
Survey of Canadians Enrolled at American 

Universities and Colleges, 1962-63, federal 

Department of Labour, 382. 
Training Girls in Industry. BRITAIN: 125. 
University graduates, supply and demand. 

CANADA: 4, 98. 

Edwards Transport Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 878; withdrawn, 1108. 

Electrical Equipment and Installations 
Ont. Power Commission Act: Electrical Code, 

147. 
Sask. Electrical Inspection and Licensing Act: 

amendment, 963. 



INDEX 



Electrical Worker, International Brother- 
hood of 
Certification applications: 

National Harbours Board, Vancouver: 396; 

withdrawn, 495. 
TransAir Limited (Dew Line Division) : 878; 
rejected, 988. 

Disputes: 

Federal Electric Corporation (Dew Line 
operations in Canada) : C.B. appointed, 576; 
C.B. fully constituted, 718; C.B. report, 
991; arbitrator appointed, 990. 
Radio Station CJCH Limited: CO. appointed, 
215; settlement, 215. 
Ladyman, William, vice-president, named gen- 
eral vice-president, CLC, 937. 
Man. Court of Queen's Bench dismisses ap- 
plication to quash Canada Labour Relations 
Board's certification order, 885. 

Elevators 

Man. Elevator Act: regulations, 221. 

Emergency Manpower Planning See Manpower 
Planning 

Emigration See Immigration — Emigration 

Empire Freightways (Midland Superior) Lim- 
ited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 288; withdrawn, 397. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
withdrawn, 397. 

Employer-Employee Relations See Labour- 
Management Relations 

Employment See also Labour Standards; Older 
Workers; Sheltered Employment 

Conference on Divisions Between Men's and 
Women's Work, Women's Bureau, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 357. 

Employment and Manpower Utilization in New 
Brunswick 1950 to 1960, federal and N.B. 
Departments of Labour, 356. 

Employment of women, proposed ILO Recom- 
mendation, 686. 

Employment of young persons, proposed ILO 
Recommendation, 686. 

Employment Review: Employment and Unem- 
ployment. CANADA: (monthly feature) 

ILO Conference on Employment Problems of 
Automation and Advanced Technology — In- 
ternational Institute for Labour Statistics, 713. 

MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., federal Minister of 
Labour, address, Queen's University, 544. 

Manpower situation, 1964. CANADA: first 
quarter, 377; second quarter, 666. 

Manpower situation, 1963. CANADA: fourth 
quarter, 108. 

Manpower situation, regional. CANADA: 110, 
379. 668. 

"Moonlighting". United States: 269. 

Multiple Jobholding in Canada, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour survey, 269. 



Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earnings" 
(monthly feature). "D-National Employment 
Service Statistics" (monthly feature) 
University graduates, demand for. CANADA: 
98. 

Employment Policy 

ILO Convention Concerning Employment 
Policy, 684, 690. 

ILO Preparatory Technical Conference on Em- 
ployment Policy, 210. 

ILO Recommendation Concerning Employment 
Policy, 691. 

Employment Service See National Employment 
Service 

Employment Stabilization 

Kaiser Steel, United Steelworkers Employment 
Stabilizing Long-Range Sharing Plan. UNITED 
STATES: 101. 332. 

Employment Standards See Labour Standards 

Empresa Consolidada Cubana de Aviacion 
(ECCA) Cubana Airlines See Cubana Air- 
lines Limited 

Engineering See Professional Manpower 
Equal Pay for Equal Work 

Equal Pay Act. UNITED STATES: 545. 

Ergonomics 

Definition: history of ergonomics, Dr. Ball, 
Senior Scientist, federal Department of Na- 
tional Health and Welfare, 778. 

A. Escott Company Limited 
Certification application: 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
1107. 



Factories 

Chief Inspector of Factories, annual report 
(1962). BRITAIN: 476. 

N.B. Industrial Safety Act: new regulations, 962. 
Ont. Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: 

regulations, 142. 
Ont. Industrial Safety Act (revised Factory, 

Shop and Office Building Act): regulations, 

960. 

Fair Employment Practices See Discrimination 

Fair Wages See also Wage Schedules 

CCA Views, 373 

Man. Fair Wages Act: regulations, 503. 

Man. Construction Industry Wages Act: regula- 
tions, 1070. 

N.B. Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: 
regulations. 742. 

Family, Canadian Conference on the 

Meeting, Governor-General and Madame Vanier, 
567. 






INDEX 



xv 



Federal Electric Corporation 
Dispute: 

Electrical Workers: C. B. appointed, 576; 
C.B. fully constituted, 718; C.B. report, 
991; arbitrator appointed, 990. 

Federal-Provincial Labour Conference 
Proceedings, 264. 

Federation of Telephone Workers of British 
Columbia 
Certification application: 

British Columbia Telephone Company: 798. 
Dispute: 

British Columbia Telephone Company: CO. 
appointed, 805. 

Fellowships 

Labour Research Fellowships, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— ILO awards 1965, 1052. 
"Fifty Years Ago" 

"50 Years Ago This Month: From the Labour 
Gazette 19 ..." (monthly feature) 

Financial Administration Act 

Prevailing Rate Employees General Regulations 

(1963), amendments, 52. 
Regulations, 888. 

Fire 

British Columbia Fire Marshal Act: regulations, 
889. 

Food Products 

ILO Tripartite Technical Meeting, Food Prod- 
ucts and Drink Industries, 209. 

Ford, C. Ross, Director, Technical and Voca- 
tional Training Branch, federal Department 
of Labour 
Federal-Provincial Labour Conference, 264. 

Forsey, Dr. Eugene, Director, Research Depart- 
ment, Canadian Labour Congress 
Commissioned to write history, trade union 
movement in Canada, 5. 

Francis, J.P., Director, Economics and Research 
Branch, federal Department of Labour 
Economic Outlook Conference, CMA meeting, 

address, 559. 
Industrial Relations Conference, McGill Uni- 
versity, address, 648. 



Gas 

Canada Shipping Act: Liquefied Petroleum Gas 

Regulations, 503.- 
Man. Gas and Oil Burner Act: regulations, 139. 

Gaspesia Pulp and Paper Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers: 
495; granted, 715. 

General Assistance 

General assistance and other welfare legislation, 
changes in 1963. CANADA: 779. 
96425—35 



Glengarry Transport Limited 
Certifiation application: 

Transportation Workers: 1107. 

GOLDENBERG, CARL, OBE, QC 

CLC permanent impartial umpire of jurisdic- 
tional disputes, appointment, 768. 

Gormley, J. A., Limited 
Dispute : 

Labourers' Protective Union: CO. appointed, 
495. 

Government Employees 

CLC convention resolutions, 474. 
Grants See University Research Grants 

Grievance Procedure 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1075. 

Guaranteed Income See Income 



H 



Handicapped Persons See Disabled Persons 
Harney Brothers Company, Limited 
Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 878; 

granted, 1105. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 878 
granted, 1105. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.: 
licensed personnel: granted, 1105. 

Health See also Radiology 
Royal Commission on Health Services, report 
(Volume 1), 658. 

Health, Industrial 

Chief Inspector of Factories, annual report 
(1962). BRITAIN: 476. 

ILO Convention Concerning Hygiene in Com- 
merce and Offices, text of, 685, 705. 

ILO Recommendation Concerning Hygiene in 
Commerce and Offices, text of, 707. 

Ont. Industrial Safety Act (1964): regulations, 
1003. 

Hector Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Theatrical Stage Employees: request for re- 
view, 215; withdrawn, 288. 
Dispute: 
Theatrical Stage Employees: CO. appointed, 
215; settlement, 397. 

Holidays See also Vacations 

Canada Labour (Standards) Code, provisions, 
1058. 

Hospitals 

Monthly Salary Rates in Hospitals, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 261. 

Hours of Work 

B.C. Hours of Work Act: regulations, 503, 1001. 
Canada Labour (Standards) Code, provisions, 

1058. 
CLC convention resolution, 468. 



XVI 



INDEX 



CLC urges progressive shortening of work week 
and other measures to reduce unemployment, 
643. 

N.B. Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: 
regulations, 742. 

Ont. Hours of Work and Vacations with Pay 
Act: amendment. 1067. 

Que. Court of Queen's Bench rules that decree 
establishing hours of work is within provin- 
cial jurisdiction, 135. 

Shorter work week no cure for unemployment 
— study, Cornell University, 100. 

Statistics: "C — Employment, Hours and Earn- 
ings" (monthly feature) 

House Building Incentive Program 
Activities, 846. 
Appropriation Act No. 5, 1963 (Winter House 

Building [Incentive] Program Regulations), 

309. 
Statistics. CANADA: 97, 766. 

Housing 

CNTU. views, 271. 

Co-operative housing project, Toronto, Ont., 

proposed by CNR employees, 378. 
Statistics. UNITED STATES: 766. 

Hubert Transport Inc. 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: rejected, 127. 

Human Rights 

CLC convention resolutions, 474. 

Huneault, J.A., Chairman, National Legislative 
Committee, International Railway Brother- 
hoods 

Labour Day message, 641. 

New Year message, 1057. 

Hygiene See Health, Industrial 



Immigration — Emigration 

Emigration, professionals to United States, sta- 
tistics tabled in House of Commons, 263. 

Immigration to Canada: first quarter (1964), 
463; second quarter (1964), 771, 1053; during 
1963, 186, 644. 

Incentive Programs See Employment Stabiliz- 
ation; House Building Program; Older 
Workers 

Income See also Labour Income 
Guaranteed income for all recommended, ad- 
dress, IAPES convention, 776. 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations of 
Ontario 

Statistics, 375 

Industrial Relations See also Canada Labour 
Relations Board 
Address, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister of 
Labour, Queen's University, 544. 



CCA meeting, Labour Relations Committee, 191. 

CM A Industrial Relations Conference, 552. 

Certification and Conciliation (monthly feature) 

Currie, R. G., Chief Conciliator, West Coast 
office, federal Department of Labour, retire- 
ment. 849. 

Developments (1963). CANADA: 106. 

Effects of technological change on collective 
bargaining and on role of government in 
labour-management relations — address, George 
S. Saunders, federal Department of Labour, 
to 16th Dominion-Provincial Conference on 
Coal, 851. 

Labour Relations and Employment Standards 
Acts (Manitoba), reviewing committee ap- 
pointed, 461. 

Labour relations legislation (1964). CANADA: 
1071. 

MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., Minister of Labour, 
address, McGill University Industrial Rela- 
tions Conference, 646. 

McGill University, Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, 332, 646. 

National Labor Relations Board (U.S.A.), statis- 
tics (1963), 405. 

N.B. Labour Relations Act: proposed amend- 
ment, 1081. 

N.S. Trade Union Act: amendments, 1079. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1080. 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1072. 

Industrial Safety See Safety, Industrial 

Industrial Standards 

Ont. Industrial Standards Act: amendments, 
1065. 

Injunctions 

B.C. Supreme Court refuses injunction, rules 
taxi zones are "place of operation" subject 
to picketing, 724. 

N.S. Supreme Court continues interim injunc- 
tion against the anticipated picketing of a 
grain ship, 305. 

Ont. High Court grants injunction against 
picketing by wildcat strikers and others aware 
of order, 502. 

Ont. High Court holds that means to enforce 
arbitration award are available, refuses in- 
junction, 307. 

International Affairs 
CLC, views, 16. 

International Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security 

Guaranteed income for all recommended, ad- 
dress, 51st annual convention, 776. 

International Atomic Energy Agency 

Meagher, Miss Margaret, Canadian Ambassador 
to Austria, elected chairman, Board of 
Governors, 938. 



INDEX 



XVII 



International Labour Organization 

Admission of Uganda, Trinidad and Tobago, 

Kenya and Laos, to membership, 211. 
Conference on Employment Problems of Auto- 
mation and Advanced Technology — Interna- 
tional Institute for Labour Statistics, 713. 
Conventions concerning: 

Benefits in Case of Employment Injury, text 

of, 685, 697. 
Discrimination in respect of Employment and 
Occupation (Convention 111) approved by 
Canadian Parliament, 939. 
Employment Policy, text of, 684, 690. 
Hygiene in Commerce and Offices, text of, 

685, 705. 
Discrimination in Employment and Occupa- 
tion — Canada proceeding to ratify, 185. 
General Conference— Session, 47 th: remarks, 
John Mainwaring, Government delegate, head 
of Canadian delegation, 210. 
General Conference — Session, 48th: Canadian 

delegation, etc., 572, 684. 
Governing Body— Session, 158th, 208. 
Governing Body — Session, 159th, 712. 
Industrial Committees— Building, Civil Engineer- 
ing and Public Works Committee, 7th session, 
491. 
International Labour Conference report, Women 

Workers in a Changing World, 387, 490. 
Labour Research Fellowships, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— ILO awards 1965, 1052. 
Mainwaring, A.J.L., Director, International 
Labour Affairs Branch (formerly ILO Branch) 
federal Department of Labour, appointment, 
98. 
Preparatory Technical Conference on Employ- 
ment Policy, 210. 
Publications on industrial radiation, 963. 
"Ratification of ILO Conventions", proceedings, 

Federal-Provincial Labour Conference, 268. 
Recommendations concerning: 

Benefits in Case of Employment Injury, text 

of, 704. 
Employment Policy, text of, 691. 
Hygiene in Commerce and Offices, text of, 
707. 
South Africa withdraws, voluntary and unilateral 

secession, 284. 
Sponsors seminar, "Vocational Rehabilitation of 

the Disabled", 277. 
Tripartite Technical Meeting, Food Products 

and Drink Industries, 209. 
U.S. National Association of Manufacturers 

will not resume ILO participation, 211. 
World labour situation, report (1963), 107. 

Island Airlines Limited 

Certification application: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
1107. 
Island Radio Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application: 

. Theatrical Stage Employees: 988; granted, 
1105. 



Job Training See Training 

Jodoin, Claude, President, Canadian Labour 
Congress 
CLC convention address, 468. 
Labour Day message, 640. 
New Year message, 1056. 

Johnstone Shipping Limited 
Certification application: 

Seafarers: 878; representation vote, 987; re- 
jected, 1106. 

Jurisdictional Disputes 

CLC constitution amended, 465. 

Goldenberg, Carl, OBE, QC, appointed per- 
manent impartial umpire of jurisdictional dis- 
putes, by CLC, 768. 



K 



Kaiser Steel Corporation 

Employment Stabilizing Long-Range Sharing 

Plan — Kaiser Steel, United Steelworkers. 

UNITED STATES: 101, 332; joint report, 

first year, 546. 
Vacation plan coverage broadened. UNITED 

STATES: 104. 

Kearns Transport Employees Association 
Certification application: 

Kearns Transport Limited: 798; withdrawn, 
878. 

Kearns Transport Limited 
Certification application: 
Kearns Transport Employees Association: 798; 
withdrawn, 878. 

Kennedy, John F., President of the United States 
AFL-CIO convention, address, 25. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Company 
Limited 

Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: application for revoca- 
tion, 39; representation vote, 287; applica- 
tion for revocation granted, 494. 

Dispute: 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 131. 

Kitimat Wharves Limited 
Certification application: 

Steelworkers: 127; withdrawn, 215. 

John Kron and Son Limited 
Certification application: 
Board of Employers: application for revoca- 
tion, 397; representation vote, 493; applica- 
tion for revocation granted, 573. 
Teamsters: application for revocation: 397; 
representation vote, 493; application for re- 
vocation granted, 573. 



XVIII 



INDEX 



La Compagnie de Navigation du Golfe Ltee 

Certification application: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 799; 

granted, 986. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 799; 

representation vote, 986; granted, 1105. 
Seafarers: 878; rejected, 988. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.: 

granted, 986. 
Mine Workers: rejected, 988. 
Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: representa- 
tion vote, 986; granted, 1105. 

La Cooperative de Transport Maritime and 
Aerien (CTMA) 
Certification application : 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 1107. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 1107. 

L'Association Nationale des Employes et 
Techniciens en Radiodiffusion 

Dispute: 

La Television de Quebec (Canada) Ltee: CO. 
appointed, 495; settlement, 575. 

La Television de Quebec (Canada) Ltee 

Dispute: 

L'Association Nationale des Employes et 
Techniciens en Radiodiffusion: CO. ap- 
pointed, 495; settlement, 575. 

Labour Attaches 

Adams, Dr. R.M., Canadian Labour Attache, 

Brussels, Belgium, appointment, 98. 
Mainwaring, A.J.L., former Canadian Labour 

Attache, Belgium returns, appointed Director, 

International Labour Affairs Branch, federal 

Department of Labour, 98. 

Labour Code See Industrial Relations 

Labour Conditions See also Wage Schedules 
Labour market developments (1963). CAN- 
ADA: 105, 106. 
Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1963, 
187. 

Labour Day 

Labour Day message, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, 

638. 
Labour Day message, labour leaders, 640. 

Labour, Department of See also Obituaries; 
Publications 

Brief, Special Committee of the Senate on 
Aging, 790. 

Conference on Divisions Between Men's and 
Women's Work — sponsored by Women's 
Bureau, federal Department of Labour, 357. 

"Department of Labour Today" (monthly 
feature) 

Labour Research Fellowships, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— ILO awards (1965) 1052. 



"Management Accounting" course, Small Busi- 
ness Management Training Division, federal 
Departments of Labour, and Trade and Com- 
merce, 358. 

Manpower Consultative Service — Director, three 
key members, appointed, 460. 

National Employment Service — transfer of ad- 
ministration to Department of Labour imple- 
ments recommendation of Gill Committee of 
Inquiry, 258. 

"Purchasing for Small Manufacturers", five- 
session course, Small Business Management 
Training Division, 184. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Program 
Activities (1964-65). CANADA: 934. 
Labour Disputes 

Five operating railway unions and 200 railroads, 
agreement. UNITED STATES: 462. 

Labour Force 

Occupational Trends in Canada, 1931 to 1961, 

federal Department of Labour, 4. 
Statistics: "A-Labour Force" (monthly feature) 
Women in the labour force in 1963. CANADA: 

279. 

Labour Gazette 

"50 Years Ago This Month: From the Labour 
Gazette 19. ..." (monthly feature) 

Labour Income 

Statistics: "B — Labour Income" (monthly fea- 
ture) 

Labour Laws and Regulations 

Alta. Labour Act: amendments, 1068, 1076. 
Canada Labour (Standards) Code, introduced 

in Commons. 1058. 
Canadian Association of Administrators of 

Labour Legislation, 23rd Conference, 947. 
Labour relations legislation (1964). CANADA: 

1071. 
Labour standards legislation planned. CANADA: 

96. 
Provincial labour bills, progress report. CAN- 
ADA: 261. 
Provincial labour standards legislation (1964). 

CANADA: 1064. 
Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

(monthly feature) 

Labour-Management Co-operation 

Labour-management committees, activities. 
CANADA: 2. 

"Labour-Management Co-operation", proceed- 
ings, Federal-Provincial Labour Conference, 
268. 

Labour-Management Relations 
CCC, views, 23. 

Effects of technological change on collective 
bargaining and on role of government in 
labour-management relations — address, George 
S. Saunders, federal Department of Labour, 
to 16th Dominion-Provincial Conference on 
Coal, 851. 

N.S. Labour-Management Study Conference, 
194. 



INDEX 



XIX 



Labour Market 

Developments (1963). CANADA: 105. 
Labour Organization 

Bibliography on labour organization, Library, 
federal Department of Labour, 1139. 

Labour Relations See Industrial Relations; 
Legal Decisions 

Labour Research 

Labour Research Fellowships, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— ILO awards (1965), 1052. 

Labour Standards 

Adoption of new inter-labour standards, 684. 

Canada Labour (Standards) Code, introduced 
in Commons, 1058. 

Labour standards legislation planned. CANADA: 
96. 

"Labour Standards", remarks, Gordon G. Cush- 
ing, assistant federal Deputy Minister of La- 
bour, Federal-Provincial Labour Conference, 
267. 

N.B. Minimum Employment Standards Act: 
regulations, 1064. 

Provincial Labour Standards, 1963 edition, 
federal Department of Labour, 359. 

Review, Labour Relations and Employment 
Standards Acts (Manitoba), committee ap- 
pointed, 461. 

Labour Unions See also Obituaries 

Autonomy of CLC re Canadian members of 
international unions, 467. 

Banks, Hal C, removal as President, Seafarers' 
International Union of Canada, 260. 

CLC, brief, federal Cabinet, 14. 

CLC convention (5th), 464. 

Canadian Marine Officers' Union — SIU, forma- 
tion, 770. 

Canadian unionist reports on Britain today, 
1091. 

Collective action by nurses to improve salaries 
and working conditions. CANADA: 360. 

CNTU, brief to federal Cabinet, 270. 

CNTU, vice-president Jean-Noel Godin ap- 
pointed, 97. 

History of trade union movement — CLC contri- 
bution to Centenary of Confederation — to be 
written by Dr. Eugene Forsey, Research 
Department, 5. 

Maritime Transportation Unions, Board of 
Trustees: 

ban unions' defamatory statements, call man- 
agement meeting, 5. 
to establish advisory council of seamen, 195. 

Membership (1964). BRITAIN: 967. 

Membership (1964). CANADA: 769. 

Membership (1963). CANADA: 8. 

Membership (1962). UNITED STATES:. 545. 

N.S. Trade Union Act: amendments, 1079. 

Railway Brotherhoods, brief to federal Cabinet, 
18. 

Sleeping car porters eligible as sleeping car con- 
ductors or dining car stewards — merger of 
minority groups, Canadian National Railways, 
262. 



Turner. Charles, President, Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union of Canada, appointment, 260. 

Union shop most popular form union security. 
UNITED STATES: 771. 

Labourers' Protective Union 
Disputes: 

Buntain Bell and Company Limited: CO. 

appointed, 495; settlement, 575. 
Gormley, J.A., Limited: CO. appointed, 495. 

Lakehead Freightways Limited 
Certification application : 

Teamsters (Saul Ste. Marie Terminal): 716; 
withdrawn, 717. 

Lakehead Harbour Commissioners 
Certification application : 

Canadian Union of Public Employees: 798; 
representation vote, 876; granted, 986. 

Lakeland Tankers Limited 
Certification application: 

Canadian Maritime Union: 715; granted, 715. 

Le Syndicat National Des Debardeurs de la 
Baie Des Ha! Ha! Inc. 
Dispute: 

Saguenay Terminals Limited: CO. appointed, 
882. 

Le Syndicat National des Employes Salaries 
de Saguenay Terminals Limited 
Dispute : 

Saguenay Terminals Limited: CO. appointed, 
882. 

Leamington Transport (Western) Limited 
Dispute : 
Teamsters: CO. appointed, 805. 

Legal Decisions 
Alta. Supreme Court — 

Rules members of employers' association are 
separate units for conciliation award, 219. 
Rules that picketing that interferes with con- 
tractual relations is unlawful, 997. 
Upholds complete freedom in appointing firm's 
representative to arbitration board, 807. 

B.C. Court of Appeal- 
Finding no error on face of arbitration 

award dismisses application to set aside, 723. 
Rules picketing on private land of a shopping 

centre is lawful, not a nuisance, 303. 

B.C. Supreme Court — 

Quashes certification order because of Labour 

Board's failure to act judicially, 409. 
Quashes Labour Relations Board's orders on 

the ground of denial of natural justice, 499. 
Refuses injunction, rules taxi zones are "place 

of operation" subject to picketing, 724. 
Remits award to arbitration board on ground 

of error on the face of the record, 590. 
Rules arbitration board should hear evidence 

on honouring of picket lines, 138. 
Rules Company and its employees equally 

liable for breaches of court injunction, 589. 
Rules that once arbitrator has. made his 

award he cannot change it substantially, 

808. 



XX 



INDEX 



Rules that the picketing of trucks making de- 
liveries to customers is illegal, 136. 
Legal Decisions Affecting Labour (monthly 
feature) 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench — 

Dismisses application to quash Canada Labour 
Relations Board's certification order, 885. 
Refuses union application for mandamus to 
compel board to hear dispute on merits, 217. 
N.S. Supreme Court continues interim injunc- 
tion against the anticipated picketing of a 
grain ship, 305. 

Ont. High Court- 
Enjoins uncertified union's peaceful picketing 

in disregard of Act's procedure, 51. 
Grants injunction against picketing by wild- 
cat strikers and others aware of order, 

502. 
Holds employee may sue for vacation pay 

owed him under collective agreement, 46. 
Holds that means to enforce arbitration 

award are available, refuses injunction, 307. 
On ground of reasonable likelihood of bias, 

bars Labour Relations Board member, 48. 
Rules Labour Relations Board has power to 

decide objections to its jurisdiction, 501. 
Rules police commission's mechanics and 

helpers covered by Labour Relations Act, 

1124. 
Rules that tips given to a waitress are part 

of wages under Minimum Wage Act, 48. 
Upholds certification order on ground that 

Court has no power to review decision, 

410. 
Upholds power of Disputes Commission to 

award work to union not on project, 220. 
P.E.I. Supreme Court quashes certification order 
on ground that local did not qualify as trade 
union, 1125. 
Que. Court of Queen's Bench rules that decree 
establishing hours of work is within provin- 
cial jurisdiction, 135. 
Que. Superior Court rules Maritime Trans- 
portation Unions Trustees Act to be con- 
stitutionally valid, 998. 
S'ask. Court of Queen's Bench rules picketing 
on unleased portions of shopping centre may 
be restrained by owner, 218. 

Supreme Court of Canada — 

Rules municipal by-law covering Sunday clos- 
ing not in conflict with federal law, 301. 

Rules that Labour Relations Board has no 
power to reinstate managerial employee, 
588. 

Upholds validity of B.C. law banning use of 
union dues for political purposes, 41. 

Levis Shipping Limited 

Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 878; 

granted, 1105. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 878; 
granted, 1105. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild: granted, 
1105. 



Libraries 

"Publications Recently Received in Department 
of Labour Library". CANADA: (monthly 
feature) 

Liquid Cargo Lines Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 495; representation vote, 573; 
granted, 715; application for revocation, 
1107. 
Intervener, certification application: 

W. A. Presswood: representation vote, 573; 
granted, 715. 

Loans See Students 

Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of 
Certification applications: 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 

Company: granted, 127; rejected, 213. 
Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway: 574; 
granted, 715. 
Dispute : 

Canadian National Railways (Prairie and 
Mountain Regions): CO. appointed, 575; 
settlement, 576. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Canada Southern Railway: representation 

vote, 987. 
Michigan Central Railroad: representation 

vote, 987. 
New York Central Railroad: representation 

vote, 987. 
Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway: rejected, 
715. 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brother- 
hood of 
Certification applications: 

Canada Southern Railway: representation 

vote, 987. 
Michigan Central Railroad Company, New 
York Central Railroad Company (lessee) : 
878. 
New York Central Railroad Company: 396; 
withdrawn, 495. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company: representation vote, 127; rejected, 
213. 

Long-Range Sharing Plan 

Employment Stabilizing Long-Range Sharing 
Plan — Kaiser Steel, United Steelworkers. 
UNITED STATES: 101, 332, 546. 

Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, 
International 
Certification applications: 

National Harbours Board (Vancouver) : 288 

withdrawn, 717. 
Western Stevedoring Company Limited: 575 

rejected, 876; reasons for judgment, 879. 
Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancouver) Limited 

575; rejected, 876; reasons for judgment, 

879. 
Disputes : 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited: 

CO. appointed, 495; settlement, 717. 
Yorke and Son Limited, F.M.: CO. appointed, 

495; settlement, 575. 



INDEX 



XXI 



Longshoremen's Association, International 
Certification applications. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 

(Local 1842 and Local 1869): 288; rejected, 

494. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.: Local 

273: application under Section 19, 39. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.: Local 

1657: rejected, 127; reasons for judgment, 

129. 
Summerhayes Industrial and Wood Products 

Limited. 1107. 
Waterman's Service (Scott) Limited: 1107. 

Disputes: 

Brown and Ryan Limited: settlement, 40. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited: settle- 
ment, 40. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited: 
settlement, 40. 

Economic Stevedoring Corporation: settlement, 
40. 

J. C. Malone and Company (1959) Limited: 
CO. appointed, 397. 

National Harbours Board (Port of Halifax) : 
CO. appointed, 495; settlement, 575. 

Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 
Limited: settlement, 40. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.: settle- 
ment, 215. 

Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited: 
CO. appointed, 397. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners (Local 
1842): settlement, 131. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners (Local 
1869): settlement, 40. 

Longshoremen's Protective Union 
Dispute: 

Newfoundland Employers Association Lim- 
ited: CO. appointed, 215; CB. appointed, 
289; CB. fully constituted, 398; CB. report, 
398; strike action, 496; Industrial Inquiry 
Commission appointed, 718; report of Com- 
mission, 1111. 

Lotteries 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, legal lotteries, 20. 



M 



M and P Transport Limited 
Dispute : 

Association of Employees of M and P Trans- 
port Limited: CO. appointed, 1108. 

McDonald, David, International President, United 
Steelworkers of America 
Policy conference, message, 476. 

MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., federal Minister of 
Labour 
Attends 48th Conference, ILO, 572. 
CLC brief, reply, 18. 
CLC convention address, 470. 
CNTU brief, reply, 272. 



Comments, statements, etc. — 

Conference, Queen's University, 544. 

Federal-Provincial Labour Conference, 264. 

Federal-Provincial Conference on Mental 
Retardation, 1097. 

International Labour Conference, 48th Ses- 
sion, 687. 

Introduces Bill C-126, Canada Labour (Stand- 
ards) Code, 1058. 

Introduces resolution approving ILO Con- 
vention Respecting Discrimination, 939; 
reviews measures already taken to outlaw 
discrimination, 939-40. 

Labour Day message, 638. 

Labour standards legislation planned, 96. 

McGill University, Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, 646. 

New Year message, 1055. 

Older Workers Employment and Training 
Incentive Program, 33. 
On establishment of Manpower Consultative 

Service, 460. 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 21. 
Removal of Hal C Banks, president, SIU, and 

appointment of Charles Turner as president, 

260. 
Urges co-operation, wipe out "islands of 

poverty", 936. 

McGill University See Industrial Relations 

Machinists, International Association of 
Certification applications: 

Air Canada (printing bureau): 798; granted, 

876. 
Allied Building Service Limited: 396; granted, 

493. 
Consolidated Aviation Fuelling of Toronto 

Limited: 214; granted, 395. 
Pacific Inland Express Limited: 1107. 
Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 

Company: 1107. 
Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 

Company (mechanical department — heat- 
ing plant): 799; granted, 876. 
Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 

Company (tool crib attendants): 799; 

granted, 876. 

Disputes: 

Air Canada: CO. appointed, 805; CB. fully 

constituted, 990. 
Quebecair, Inc.: CO. appointed, 805; CB. 

appointed, 1109; CB. fully constituted, 

1109. 
Trans-Canada Air Lines: settlement, 132; 

CB. report, 134. 
TransAir Limited: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Quebecair, Inc. (hostesses and flight agents) : 

representation vote, 213. 
Quebecair, Inc. (traffic, maintenance, and 

office departments) : representation vote, 

213; rejected, 395. 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: rejected, 

395. 



XXII 



INDEX 



McIlraith, Hon. George J., Minister of Trans- 
port 
Railway Brotherhoods brief, reply, 21. 

McLure Transport Limited 
Dispute : 

Mine Workers: dispute lapsed, 991. 

McNamara Marine Limited 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Mahoney, William, National Director, United 
Steelworkers of America 
Policy conference, report, 475. 

Mainwaring, A. J. L., Director, International 
Labour Affairs Branch, federal Department of 
Labour 
Appointment, 98. 

J. C. M ALONE AND COMPANY (1959) LIMITED 

Dispute : 

Longshoremen: CO. appointed, 397. 

Management 
Arts of Management conference. CANADA: 
665. 

Manpower 

Dymond, W. R., Assistant Deputy Minister of 
Labour — addresses first national convention 
Canadian Vocational Association, 461; co- 
operates with U.S. experts in preparation of 
study "Manpower Policy and Programmes in 
the United States", 642. 

Employment and Manpower Utilization in New 
Brunswick 1950 to I960, report, federal and 
N.B. Departments of Labour, 356. 

Manpower situation. CANADA: 

1964, first quarter, 377; second quarter, 666. 
1963, fourth quarter, 108. 
Regional, 110, 379, 668. 

Manpower Studies No. 1 — The Pattern of the 
Future — first report, Minister of Labour's 
Manpower Research Unit. UNITED KING- 
DOM: 806. 

OECD, Manpower and Social Affairs Com- 
mittee report "Manpower Policy and Pro- 
grammes in the United States", recommenda- 
tions, etc., 642. 

Working life of U.S. males, 959. 
Manpower Consultative Service 

Manpower Consultative Service, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour — Director, 3 key members, 
appointed, 460. 

Proceedings, Federal-Provincial Labour Con- 
ference, 265. 

Manpower Planning 

"Emergency Manpower Planning", proceedings, 
Federal-Provincial Conference, 268. 

Manufacturing 

Corporate profits in 1963, survey, CM A, 546. 

"Purchasing for Small Manufacturers", five- 
session course, federal Department of Labour, 
184. 



Maple Leaf Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: granted, 127. 
Dispute: 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 397; 
CB. appointed, 576; CB. fully constituted, 
717; CB. report, 1109. 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited 
Certification applications: 

National Syndicate of Employees of Maple 

Leaf Mills Limited: 129; rejected, 288. 
Packinghouse Workers (Local 511): 495; 

withdrawn, 575. 
Packinghouse Workers (Local 1145): 574; 

granted, 715. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: 129; rejected, 
288. 
Dispute: 

Packinghouse Workers: CO. appointed, 1108. 
Intervener, certification applications : 

National Syndicate of the Employees of 
Maple Leaf Mills Limited (CNTU): re- 
jected, 288. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: rejected, 288. 

Marchand, Jean, President, Confederation of 
National Trade Unions 
Labour Day message, 641. 
New Year message, 1056. 

Marconi Salaried Employees' Association 
Dispute: 

Canadian Marconi Company: CO. appointed, 
805. 

Marine Industries Limited 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Maritime Transportation Unions 

Banks, Hal C, removal from presidency, Sea- 
farers' International Union of Canada, 260. 

Board of Trustees — ban unions' defamatory 
statements, call management meeting, 5; to 
establish advisory council of seamen, 195. 

Maritime trusteeship and SIU — CLC views, 464; 
convention resolutions, 465. 

Maritime Transportation Unions Trustees Act 
Que. Superior Court rules Act to be con- 
stitutionally valid, 998. 

Martel Express Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 39; rejected, 213. 

Meagher, Miss Margaret, Canadian Ambassador 
to Austria 
Chairman, Board of Governors, International 
Atomic Energy Agency, 938. 

Meany, George, President, American Federation 
of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations 
Convention address, 24. 
Metal Working 

Metal Working Occupations, No. 8, Canadian 
Occupations Series, federal Department of 
Labour, 1053. 



INDEX 



XXIII 



Michigan Central Railroad 

Cerification application: 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (New 
York Central Railroad Company, Lessee): 
878; representation vote, 987. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Locomotive Engineers: representation vote, 
987. 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba 

Dispute: 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. 
appointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Millar and Brown Limited 
Certification application : 
Office Employees: 1107. 

Millard, Charles H., Trustee, Maritime Trans- 
portation Unions 
Remarks, policy conference, USWA, 476. 

Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, Inter- 
national Union of 
Certification application: 
Canadian Longyear Limited: 798; withdrawn, 
878. 
Disputes : 

National Harbours Board (Port Colborne 
Grain Elevator): CO. appointed, 215; set- 
lement, 398. 
United Keno Hill Mines Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; settlement, 805. 

Mine Workers of America, United 

Certification applications : 
Agence Maritime Inc. (licensed personnel) : 

878. 
Agence Maritime Inc. (unlicensed personnel) : 

878. 
Canadian Westinghouse Company Limited 

(Atomic Fuel Department): 495; granted, 

573. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

(Domaine Etria and Pavilion Mercier 

Projects): granted, 127. 
Harney Brothers Company Limited (licensed 

personnel) : 878. 
Harney Brothers Company Limited (unlicensed 

personnel) : 878. 
La Compagnie de Navigation du Golfe 

(licensed personnel): 799; granted, 986. 
La Compagnie de Navigation du Golfe (un- 
licensed personnel) : 799; representation vote, 

986; granted, 1105. 
La Cooperative de Transport Maritime and 

Aerien (CTMA) (licensed personnel): 1107. 
La Cooperative de Transport Maritime and 

Aerien (CTMA) (unlicensed personnel) : 

1107. 
Levis Shipping Limited (licensed personnel): 

878; granted, 1105. 
Levis Shipping Limited (unlicensed person- 
nel): 878; granted, 1105. 
North Shipping and Transportation Limited 

(licensed personnel): 799; withdrawn, 988. 



North Shipping and Transportation Limited 
(unlicensed personnel): 799; withdrawn, 
988. 

North Shipping Lines Limited (licensed per- 
sonnel): 799. 

North Shore Shipping Lines (unlicensed per- 
sonnel): 799; granted, 986. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (licensed personnel): 
878; withdrawn, 988; rejected, 1106. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (unlicensed person- 
nel): 878; withdrawn, 988; rejected, 1106. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (licensed personnel) 
(new application) : 988. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (unlicensed person- 
nel) (new application): 988. 

Polaris Shipping Limited (licensed personnel) : 
799; granted, 986. 

Polaris Shipping Limited (unlicensed person- 
nel): 799; representation vote, 986. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: 128; rep- 
resentation vote, 286; granted, 395. 
Disputes: 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation: 
CO. appointed, 289; settlement, 397. 

McLure Transport Limited: dispute lapsed, 
991. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Agence Maritime Inc. (licensed personnel) : 
representation vote, 1106. 

La Cie de Navigation du Golfe Ltee: re- 
jected, 988. 

North Shipping and Transportation Limited: 
representation vote, 1105. 

Orleans Navigation Inc.: representation vote, 
1105. 

Polaris Shipping Limited (unlicensed person- 
nel): rejected, 987. 

Trans- World Chartering Limited: granted, 
573; representation vote, 573; 715. 

Minimum Wages 

B.C. Female Minimum Wage Act: orders, 52; 
309; regulations, 1001. 

B.C. Male Minimum Wage Act: orders, 52, 309, 
725; regulations, 1001. 

Canada Labour (Standards) Code, provisions, 
1058. 

N.B. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 1065. 

N.S. Minimum Wage Act: regulations, 1069. 

Ont. High Court rules that tips given to a wait- 
ress are part of wages under Minimum Wage 
Act, 48. 

Ont. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 811; 
regulations, 593, 1127. 

Sask. Minimum Wage Act: orders, 313. 

Mining 

Mining Occupations, No. 14 "Canadian Occupa- 
tions" series, vocational guidance, 261. 
N.S. Coal Mines Regulation Act: provision, 
1080. 

Moonlighting See Employment 

Morris, Joseph, Executive Vice-President, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress 
AFL-CIO convention, address, 25. 

Mothers' Allowances 
Changes in legislation (1963). CANADA: 783. 



XXIV 



INDEX 



Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 
Dispute: 

Teamsters: CO. appointed, 717. 

Multiple Jobholding See Employment 
"Moonlighting". UNITED STATES: 269. 

Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 
Activities (1963-64), 97, 185. 
1963-64 program, 458. 

Projects approved up to November 30, 1964, 
1052. 

Murchison, C.A.L. Commissioner, Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission 
Retirement, 937. 



N 



National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons 
Meeting, 3rd, 547. 

National Association of Manufacturers 
(U.S.A.) 

Will not resume ILO participation, 211. 
National Economic Development Council 

Construction industry survey. BRITAIN: 358. 

National Employment Committee 
Jaskula, John, chairman, appointment, 1053. 

National Employment Service 
Monthly report on operations 
Statistics: "D — National Employment Service 

Statistics" (monthly feature) 
Supply and Demand — University Graduates 

1963-64, Executive and Professional Division, 

4, 98. 
Transfer of administration to Department of 

Labour implements recommendation of Gill 

Committee of Inquiry, 258. 

National Harbours Board 
Certification applications: 

Electrical Workers (Vancouver) : 396; with- 
drawn, 495. 

Longshoremen and Warehousemen (Vancou- 
ver) : 288; withdrawn, 717. 

National Syndicate of Employees of the Mont- 
real Harbour (Cold Storage Plant): 574; 
representation vote, 797; rejected, 797; 
granted, 986. 

National Syndicate of Employees of the Mont- 
real Harbour (General Operations Section) : 
574; representation vote, 797; rejected, 797; 
granted, 986. 

National Syndicate of Employees of the Mont- 
real Harbour (Grain Elevators Section): 
574; representation vote, 797; granted, 986. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Quebec 
Harbour (Quebec): 716. 

Operating Engineers (Vancouver): 397; re- 
jected, 573. 

Seafarers (Montreal): application for revo- 
cation, 288. 

Vancouver Harbour Employees Association 
(Vancouver) : rejected, 573. 



Disputes: 

Civil Service Association of Canada: Quebec 
Harbour Police: CO. appointed, 131; 
settlement, 496. 

Longshoremen (Port of Halifax) : CO. 
appointed, 495. 

Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers: Port Col- 
borne Grain Elevator: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 398. 

National Harbours Board Police Brotherhood: 
Montreal Harbour: CB. fully constituted, 
132; CB. report, 496; settlement, 496, 576. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: cold storage 
warehouse, Montreal: representation vote, 
797; rejected, 797; granted, 986. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: general forces, 
Montreal: representation vote, 797; rejected, 
797; granted, 986. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: grain eleva- 
tors, Montreal: representation vote, 797; 
rejected, 797; granted, 986. 

National Harbours Board Police Brotherhood 
Dispute: 

National Harbours Board (Montreal Har- 
bour): CB. fully constituted, 132; CB. 
report, 496; settlement, 496, 576. 

National Labor Relations Board (U.S.A.) 
Statistics (1963), 405. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Alumin- 
ium of Baie Comeau 

Certification application: 

Canadian British Aluminium Company Limi- 
ted: 396; granted, 493. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Maple 
Leaf Mills Limited 

Certification application : 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited: 129; rejected, 288. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited: rejected, 288. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Montreal 
Harbour 

Certification applications: 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (cold 
storage plant section) : 574; representation 
vote, 797; rejected, 797. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (gen- 
eral operations section) : 574; representation 
vote, 797; rejected, 797; granted, 986. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (grain 
elevators section) : 574; representation vote, 
797; rejected, 797; granted, 986. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Ogilvie 
Flour Mills Company Limited 

Certification application : 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited: 127; 
representation vote, 286; granted, 493. 

Intervener, certification application: 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited: rep- 
resentation vote, 286; rejected, 493. 



INDEX 



XXV 



National Syndicate of Employees of Quebec 
Air Transport 
Certification applications: 

Quebecair Inc. (traffic maintenance and opera- 
tions departments) : 128; representation vote, 
213; rejected, 395. 
Quebecair Inc. (hostesses and flight agents) : 
129; representation vote, 213; rejected, 395. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Quebec 
Harbour 
Certification application: 

National Harbours Board (Quebec): 716. 

National Syndicate of Employees of Robin 
Hood Flour Mills Limited 
Certification application: 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: 128; rep- 
resentation vote, 286; granted, 395. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: representa- 
tion vote, 287; rejected, 395. 

National Syndicate of the Employees of the 
Trucking Industry, Saguenay Lake St. 
John Inc. 
Certification application: 
Tremblay Express Limited: 288; withdrawn, 
397. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council 
Meeting, 7th, 661. 

New Year's Messages 

Labour leaders, 1056, 1057. 
MacEachen, Hon. Allan J., federal Minister of 
Labour, 1055. 

New York Central Railroad Company 

Certification application: 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen: 396; 
withdrawn, 495; representation vote, 987. 
Intervener, certification application : 

Locomotive Engineers: representation vote, 
987. 

Newfoundland Employers Association Limited 

Dispute : 

Longshoremen's Protective Union: CO. 
appointed, 215; C.B. appointed, 289; C.B. 
fully constituted, 398; C.B. report, 398; 
strike action, 496; Industrial Inquiry Com- 
mission appointed, 718; report of Commis- 
sion, 1111. 

Niagara Television Limited 
Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: withdrawn, 575. 

Norlake Steamships Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Seafarers: 799; representation vote, 876; 
granted, 986. 

North-American Elevators Limited 
Disputes: 

Syndicat Catholique et National des Debar- 
deurs de Sorel Inc.: CO. appointed, 289; 
C.B. appointed, 717; C.B. fully constituted, 
805. 



Syndicat Catholique et National des Debar- 
deurs de Sorel Inc.: maintenance employ- 
ees: CO. appointed, 397; settlement, 496. 

North Shipping and Transportation Limited 

Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 799; 
withdrawn, 988. 

Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 799; 
withdrawn, 988. 

Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: 799; repre- 
sentation vote, 1105. 

Seafarers: marine engineers: 1107; withdrawn, 
1108. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild; with- 
drawn, 988. 
Mine Workers: representation vote, 1105. 

North Shore Shipping Lines Limited 
Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 799; 

granted, 986. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 799; 
granted, 986. 

Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild Inc. (li- 
censed personnel): granted, 986. 

Northern Alberta Railways Company 
Certification application: 
Railroad Trainmen: 129; granted, 213. 

Northern Telephone Company Limited 
Dispute : 

Communications Workers: CO. appointed, 
215; settlement, 289. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 495; settlement, 
575. 

Northland Shipping (1962) Company Limited 

Dispute: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
CO. appointed, 289; C.B. appointed, 496; 
C.B. fully constituted, 576; C.B. report, 
718; strike action after Board procedure, 
806. 

Northwest Shipping (1962) Company Limited 

Dispute : 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
CO. appointed, 289; C.B. appointed, 496; 
C.B. fully constituted, 576; C.B. report, 
718; strike action after Board procedure, 
806. 

Nurses 

Collective action by nurses to improve salaries 
and working conditions. CANADA: 360. 

Man. Licensed Practical Nurses Act: regula- 
tions, 593. 

Monthly Salary Rates in Hospitals, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 261. 



XXVI 



INDEX 



O 



Obituaries 

Anderson, Miss Mary, Director, U.S. Women's 
Bureau 1920-1944, 104. 

Bell, Adam Wightman, former B.C. Deputy 
Minister of Labour, organizer CAALL, 937. 

Carroll, Gerard R., Chief, Fair Employment 
Practices Division, federal Department of 
Labour, 768. 

Casselman, Dr. P. H., Chief, Manpower Re- 
sources Division, federal Department of La- 
bour, 768. 

Jenoves, William, general Vice-President, CLC, 
and President, Toronto and District Labour 
Council, 848. 

Kelly, Arthur J., OBE, former Canadian Vice- 
President, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 
849. 

Provost, Roger, President, Quebec Federation 
of Labour, 936. 

Rigg, Richard Arthur, former senior official, 
federal Department of Labour, 768. 

Russell, R. B. (Bob), leader in 1919 Winnipeg 
General Strike and retired Executive Secre- 
tary of Winnipeg and District Labour Coun- 
cil, 848. 

Occupational Safety See Safety, Industrial 

Occupational Trends See Labour Force 

O'Connor Transport Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 39; withdrawn, 129. 

Office Buildings See Factories 

Office Employees' International Union 
Certification applications: 

Canadian Freightways Limited: 128; granted, 

213. 
Millar and Brown Limited: 1107. 
Dispute: 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada (Direc- 
tory Sales Dept., Eastern Region) : CO. 
appointed, 289; settlement, 496. 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited 
Certification applications: 

National Syndicate of Employees of Ogilvie 
Flour Mills Company Limited: 127; rep- 
resentation vote, 286; granted, 493. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: 128; repre- 
sentation vote, 286; rejected, 493. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

National Syndicate of Employees of Ogilvie 
Flour Mills Company Limited: representa- 
tion vote, 286; rejected, 493. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: representation 
vote, 286; granted, 493. 

Oil Burners 

Man. Gas and Oil Burner Act: regulations, 139. 

Old Age Assistance 

Statistics. CANADA: 262, 463, 770, 1054. 



Older Workers See also Aging 

B.C. Fair Employment Practices Act extended to 
include discrimination against older workers, 
943. 

CCC, views, 23. 

Job Re-design, publication on increasing man's 
efficiency at work, commissioned by OECD, 
984. 

Older Workers Employment and Training In- 
centive Program. CANADA: extension, 33; 
regulations, 52; review, 202; statistics, 386. 

"Older Workers in a Changing Employment En- 
vironment", address, Ian Campbell, National 
Co-ordinator, Civilian Rehabilitation, 868. 

Selected Statistics on the Older Population of 
Canada, DBS report, 489, 566. 

U.S. National Council on the Aging, 278. 

Vocational rehabilitation services, older dis- 
abled persons. CANADA: 116. 

Vocational Training Methods for Older Work- 
ers in the French Railways, report, OECD 
Seminar, 1098. 

Ontario Federation of Labour 
Education Conference, 193. 

Ontario Northland Railway 
Certification application: 

Railroad Trainmen: 129; granted, 213. 
Dispute : 

Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. 
appointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Operating Engineers, Canadian Union of 
Certification application: 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: 128; rep- 
resentation vote, 286; granted, 395. 
Dispute: 

Canadian Arsenals Limited (Small Arms Di- 
vision) : CO. appointed, 575; settlement, 
576. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: rejected, 
395. 

Operating Engineers, International Union of 
Certification applications: 

Canadian National Hotels (Nova Scotian Ho- 
tel): 495; withdrawn, 575. 
National Harbours Board (Vancouver): 397; 
rejected, 573. 
Organization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development 
Council recommendations, manpower policy, 642. 
Job Re-design, publication on increasing man's 
efficiency at work, 984. 

Manpower Policy Programmes in the United 
States, Manpower and Social Affairs Commit- 
tee report, 642. 

Resources of Scientific and Technical Personnel 
in the OECD Area, report, 185. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. 
Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 878; with- 
drawn, 988; rejected, 1106. 



INDEX 



XXVII 



Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 878; 
withdrawn, 988; rejected, 1106. 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: (new 
application) : 988. 

Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: (new 
application): 988. 

Seafarers: marine engineers: 1107. 

Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: 799; rep- 
resentation vote, 1105. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Mine Workers: representation vote, 1105. 

Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: withdrawn, 
988. 

Ottawa Transportation Commission 
Dispute: 

Street Railway Employees: CO. appointed, 
289; settlement, 496. 

Ottor Freightways Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 214; withdrawn, 215. 



Pacific Inland Limited 
Certification application: 
Machinists: 1107. 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited 
Certification application: 
Seafarers: withdrawn, 1108. 

Pacific Western Airlines 
Dispute: 

Air Line Pilots (I.F.R. and V.F.R. Divisions) : 
CO. appointed, 40; settlement, 131. 

Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, 
United 
Certification applications: 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited (Local 511): 495; 
withdrawn, 575. 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited (Local 1145): 574; 
granted, 715. 
Disputes : 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited: CO. appointed, 
1108. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited (laboratory 
department) : CB. appointed, 40; CB. fully 
constituted, 131; CB. report, 882. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited (plant em- 
ployees) : CB. appointed, 40; CB. fully 
constituted, 132; CB. report, 216; settle- 
ment, 496. 

Pearson, Rt. Hon. Lester B., Prime Minister of 
Canada 
Addresses graduates, 99th and 100th Small Busi- 
ness Management Training courses, 1050. 
CLC brief, reply, 18. 
CLC convention address, 469. 
CNTU brief, reply, 272. 

Pensions 

Canada Pension Plan, CLC views, 16, 643. 
Chrysler— UAW 3-year agreement, 850. 
Ont. Pension Benefits Act (1962-63): regula- 
tions, 890. 



Pension Plans in Canadian Industry, 187. 

Railway Brotherhoods, views re Canada Pen- 
sion Plan, 20. 

Sask. Employee Pension Plans Registration and 
Disclosure Act (1961): regulations, 312. 

Picketing 

Alta. Supreme Court rules that picketing that 
interferes with contractual relations is unlaw- 
ful, 997. 

B.C. Court of Appeal rules picketing on private 
land of a shopping centre is lawful, not a 
nuisance, 303. 

B.C. Supreme Court refuses injunction, rules 
taxi zones are "place of operation" subject 
to picketing, 724. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules arbitration board 
should hear evidence on honouring of picket 
lines, 138. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules that the picketing of 
trucks making deliveries to customers is il- 
legal, 136. 

N.S. Supreme Court continues interim injunc- 
tion against the anticipated picketing of a 
grain ship, 305. 

Ont. High Court enjoins uncertified union's 
peaceful picketing in disregard of Act's pro- 
cedure, 51. 

Ont. High Court grants injunction against pick- 
eting by wildcat strikers and others aware of 
order, 502. 

Sask. Court of Queen's Bench rules picketing 
on unleased portions of shopping centre 
may be restrained by owner, 218. 

Piette Transport Inc. 
Dispute: 

Teamsters: CO. appointed, 397; settlement, 
496. 

Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada 
Limited 
Dispute : 

Longshoremen: settlement, 40. 

Polaris Shipping Limited 
Certification applications: 

Mine Workers: licensed personnel: 799; 

granted, 986. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: 799; 

representation vote, 986. 
Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: 799; re- 
jected, 987. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild Inc.: li- 
censed personnel: granted, 986. 
Mine Workers: unlicensed personnel: re- 
jected, 987. 
Seafarers: unlicensed personnel: 986. 

Police 

Ont. Police Act: amendments, 1080. 

Ont. Public Service Act (1961-62): regulation, 

742. 

Political Education 
CLC views, 473. 



XXVIII 



INDEX 



J. P. Porter Company Limited 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Poverty See Canadian Welfare Council 
Pressure Vessels See Boilers 
Presswood, W. A. 

Intervener, certification application: 

Liquid Cargo Lines Limited: representation 
vote, 573; granted, 715. 

Prevailing Rate Employees 
Prevailing Rate Employees General Regulations 
(1963), amendments. CANADA: 52. 

Prices 

Price Index: Canada, United States, Britain 
(monthly feature) 
Statistics: "F-Prices" (monthly feature) 

U.S. labour, business, advised to avoid wage 
and price rises, President's Economic Report 
to Congress, 186. 
Professional Manpower 

Annual earnings, scientific and technical pro- 
fessions, 1963. CANADA: 1020. 

Demand, scientists and engineers. UNITED 
STATES: 4. 

Drop-out Rates in University Engineering 
Courses, Professional Manpower Bulletin No. 
3, federal Department of Labour, 29, 185. 

Emigration, professionals to United States, sta- 
tistics tabled in House of Commons, 263. 

Resources of Scientific and Technical Personnel 
in the OECD Area, report of Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development, 185. 

Professional Transport Workers Union of 
Canada 
Certification application: 

H. M. Trimble and Sons Limited: 798; 
granted, 876. 
Profit Sharing See Kaiser Steel Corporation 

Profits 

Corporate profits in 1963, survey CMA, 546. 

Public Service 

Ont. Public Service Act (1961-62): regulation, 

742. 
Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1075. 

Public Welfare See General Assistance 
Public Works 

Alta. Public Works Creditors Payment Act: 

regulations, 1068. 
ILO Building, Civil Engineering and Public 

Works Committee, 7th session, 491, 
Ont. Public Works Creditors Payment Act: 
regulations, 412. 

Publications 

Departmental Publications — 

Drop-out Rates in University Engineering 
Courses, Professional Manpower Bulletin 
No. 3, 29, 185. 
Impact and Implications of Office Automa- 
tion, Occasional Paper No. 1, 645. 



Metal Working Occupations, No. 8, Canadian 
Occupation Series, 1053. 

Monthly Salary Rates in Hospitals, 261. 

Multiple Jobholding in Canada, 269. 

Occupational Trends in Canada, 1931 to 
1961, 4. 

Provincial Labour Standards, 359. 

Selected Bibliography on Labour Organiza- 
tion, 1139. 

Technological Changes in the Railway Indus- 
try, Maritime Area of CNR, 1948-60, 1081. 

Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 
1963, 187. 

Employment and Manpower Utilization in 
New Brunswick 1950 to 1960, federal and 
N.B. Departments of Labour, 356. 

Publications Recently Received in Department 
of Labour Library (monthly feature) 

Supply and Demand — University Graduates 
1963-64, Executive and Professional Divi- 
sion, NES, 98. 

Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, 
International 

Certification applications: 

Cargill Grain Company Limited: 288; granted, 

395. 
Gaspesia Pulp and Paper Company Limited: 

495; granted, 715. 
Quebec North Shore Paper Company: 799; 

granted, 876. 



Quebec Cartier Mining Company 

Certification application: 

Seafarers: 574; representation vote, 797; 

granted, 876. 
Dispute: 

Seafarers: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Quebec Federation of Labour 
Laberge, Louis, President, 936. 
Provost, Roger, President, death of, 936. 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 
Company 
Certification applications : 

Machinists: clerical employees, Mechanical 

Department: 1107. 
Machinists: Mechanical Department — Heating 

Plant: granted, 876. 
Machinists: tool crib attendants: 799; 
granted, 876. 

Quebec North Shore Paper Company 
Certification application: 

Pulp and Paper Mill Workers: 799; granted, 
876. 

Quebecair Inc. 

Certification applications: 

National Syndicate of Employees of Quebec 
Air Transport: hostesses and flight agents: 
129; representation vote, 213; rejected, 395. 



INDEX 



XXIX 



National Syndicate of Employees of Quebec 
Air Transport: traffic, maintenance, and 
office departments: 128; representation 
vote, 213; rejected, 395. 

Dispute: 

Machinists: CO. appointed, 805; C.B. 
appointed, 1109; C.B. fully constituted, 1109. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Machinists: hostesses and flight agents: rep- 
resentation vote, 213; rejected, 395. 
Machinists: traffic, maintenance, and office 
departments: representation vote, 213; re- 
jected, 395. 



R 



Radio and Television Employees of Canada, 
Association of 
Affiliation, CLC, 644. 
Certification applications: 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: request 

for review, 1108. 
Western Manitoba Broadcasters Limited: 288; 
granted, 286. 
Disputes: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: settle- 
ment, 215. 
Western Manitoba Broadcasters Limited: CO. 
appointed, 717; C.B. appointed, 1109. 

Radio Futura Limited 
Dispute : 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 496. 

Radio Laurentides Inc. 
Dispute: 

Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 717; 
settlement, 805. 

Radio Saguenay Limited 
Dispute: 
Broadcast Employees: CO. appointed, 397; 
Minister refused to appoint C.B., 1109. 

Radio Station CHRC Limitee 
Dispute : 

Broadcast Employees: C.B. appointed, 131; 
C.B. fully constituted, 215. 

Radio Station CJCH Limited 
Dispute: 

Electrical Workers: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 215. 

Radiology 

Ont. Radiological Technicians Act: regulations, 

902. 
Sask. Radiological Health Act: provisions, 147. 

Railroad Telegraphers, Order of 
Certification applications: 

Canadian National Railways (Telecommuni- 
cations Department) : granted, 286. 

Canadian National Railways (unit of agents, 
despatchers and operators, Newfoundland) : 
granted, 286. 

Canadian National Railways (unit of system 
employees in Canada except Newfound- 
land): granted, 286. 



Intervener, certification application: 

Canadian National Railways (unit of employ- 
ees in various clerical and other classifica- 
tions, Newfoundland) : granted, 286. 

Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of 

Certification applications: 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (sleeping 

car and parlour car conductors): 129; 

granted, 213. 
Northern Alberta Railways Company: 129; 

granted, 213. 
Ontario Northland Railway: 129; granted, 213. 
Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway: 574; 

granted, 715. 

Disputes : 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company: CO. appointed, 215; settlement, 
289. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (dining- 
car-service employees): CO. appointed, 575; 
settlement, 805. 
Cumberland Railway Company (Sydney and 
Louisburg Division): C.B. appointed, 1109. 
Kelly, Arthur J., former Canadian Vice-Presi- 
dent, death of, 849. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Hand- 
lers, Express and Station Employees, 
Brotherhood of 

Certification applications : 

Canada Steamship Lines: 575; granted, 715. 

Canadian National Railways (unit of em- 
ployees in various clerical and other classi- 
fications) : granted. 286. 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited: 129; rejected, 288. 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited: 128; 
representation vote, 286; rejected, 493. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: 128; repre- 
sentation vote, 287; rejected, 395. 

Disputes: 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 495; C.B. appointed, 805; C.B. fully 
constituted, 882. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Mer- 
chandise Services Department, Prairie and 
Pacific Regions): CO. appointed, 40; set- 
tlement, 575. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Canadian National Railways (agents, dispatch- 
ers and operators, Newfoundland) : granted, 
286. 

Maple Leaf Mills Limited: rejected, 288. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (cold 
storage warehouse): representation vote, 
797; rejected, 797; granted, 986. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (general 
forces) : representation vote, 797; rejected, 
797; granted, 986. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) (grain 
elevators) : representation vote, 797; re- 
jected, 797; granted, 986. 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company. Limited: re- 
presentation vote, 286; granted, 493. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: represen- 
tation vote, 286; granted, 395. 



XXX 



INDEX 



Railway Brotherhoods, International 
National Legislative Committee — 
Brief, federal Cabinet, 18. 
Huneault, J. A., Chairman, Labour Day mes- 
sage, 641. New Year message, 1057. 

Railway Running Trades, Brotherhood of 
Certification application: 

Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway (Operat- 
ing employees): 574; rejected, 715. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway (loco- 
motive engineers): granted, 715. 
Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway (unit of 
yard conductors and yard brakemen): 
granted, 715. 

Railway, Transport and General Workers, 
Canadian Brotherhood of 

Certification applications: 

Berven Enterprises Ltd.: 716; withdrawn, 717; 
granted, 797; 798. 

A. Escott Company Limited: 1107. 

Island Airlines Limited: 1107. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority: 716; granted, 
797. 

Texada Towing Company Limited: granted, 
493; 494. 

Vancouver Tug Boat Company Limited: 
granted, 127. 

Veteran Transfer Limited: 1107 . 

Western Tug and Barge Limited: 988; granted, 
1105. 
Co-operative housing project, Toronto, Ont., pro- 
posed by CNR employees, 378. 
Disputes : 

B.C. Air Lines Limited: CO. appointed, 215; 
settlement, 398. 

B.C. Towboat Owners Association: CO. ap- 
pointed, 990; CB. appointed, 1109. 

B.C. Towboat Owners Association (various 
companies) : CO. appointed, 990; CB. 
appointed, 1109. 

Canadian National Hotels Limited (Bess- 
borough Hotel, Saskatoon) : CO. appointed, 
805; CB. appointed, 1109. 

Canadian National Hotels Limited (Fort 
Garry Hotel, Winnipeg) : CO. appointed, 
805; CB. appointed, 1108. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (S.S. Prin- 
cess of Acadia): CO. appointed, 1108. 

Northland Shipping (1962) Company Limited: 
CO. appointed, 289; CB. appointed, 496; 
CB. fully constituted, 576; CB. report, 718; 
strike action after Board procedure, 806. 

Northwest Shipping (1962) Company Lim- 
ited: CO. appointed, 289; CB. appointed, 
496; CB. fully constituted, 576; CB. re- 
port, 718; strike action after Board pro- 
cedure, 806. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority: CO. ap- 
pointed, 289; settlement, 496. 

Intervener, certification applications: 

Canadian National Railways (unit of agents, 
despatchers and operators, Newfoundland): 
granted, 286. 
Canadian National Railways (unit of system 
employees in Canada except Newfound- 
land) : granted, 286. 



Empire Freightways (Midland Superior) Lim- 
ited: withdrawn, 397. 
D. S. Scott Transport Limited: rejected, 876. 
Robson, Elroy, national vice-president, retire- 
ment, 937. 
Sleeping car porters eligible as sleeping car 
conductors or dining car stewards — merger 
of minority groups, Canadian National 
Railways, 262. 

Railways 

Co-operative housing project, Toronto, Ont., 

proposed by CNR employees, 378. 
Five operating railway unions and 200 railroads, 

agreement. UNITED STATES: 462. 
Railway Brotherhoods, brief, federal Cabinet, 18, 

19. 
Technological Changes in the Railway Industry, 

Maritime Area of CNR, 1948-60, Department 

of Labour. CANADA: 1081. 

Rehabilitation 

Canadians design stair-climbing wheelchair, 867. 

Conditions of work in sheltered employment — 
address, National Co-ordinator, Civilian Re- 
habilitation. CANADA: 983. 

Federal-Provincial Conference on Mental Re- 
tardation, 1097. 

ILO seminar, "Vocational Rehabilitation of the 
Disabled", 277. 

International Seminar on Sheltered Employ- 
ment, to be held in Sweden, 385. 

Provincial progress report (1963-64), 484. 

Rehabilitation — An International Concern, 565. 

Rehabilitation and Social Work Seminar, Sas- 
katchewan Co-ordinating Council on Reha- 
bilitation, 277. 

Sheltered employment, expansion. CANADA: 
32. 

Special Services Rehabilitation Unit of Jewish 
Vocational Service, Toronto, established on 
continuing basis, 789. 

Training course in rehabilitation, Winnipeg, 
Man., 663. 

Vocational rehabilitation services, older dis- 
abled persons. CANADA: 116. 

Reid's Moving and Storage Company Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 397; granted, 493. 

Reimer Express Lines Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 717; rejected, 876. 

Rempel, Peter 

Certification application: 

Broadcast Employees: request for review, 
1108. 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Employees 
Association 

Certification application: 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited: 495; 

rejected, 573. 



INDEX 



XXXI 



Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited 
Certification application: 

Rempel-Trail Transportation Employees As- 
sociation: 495; rejected, 573. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Teamsters: rejected, 573. 

Research See Labour Research; Manpower; 
University Research Grants 

Retardation See Rehabilitation 
Retraining See Automation; Training 
Right of Association 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1073. 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited 
Certification applications: 
Mine Workers: 128; representation vote, 286; 

granted, 395. 
National Syndicate of Employees of Robin 
Hood Flour Mills Ltd.: 128; representa- 
tion vote, 286; granted, 395. 
Operating Engineers: 128; representation 

vote, 286; granted, 395. 
Railway and Steamship Clerks: 128; repre- 
sentation vote, 287; rejected, 395. 

Disputes: 

Packinghouse Workers: laboratory depart- 
ment: C.B. appointed, 40; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 131; C.B. report, 882. 

Packinghouse Workers: plant employees: 
C.B. appointed, 40; C.B. fully constituted, 
132; C.B. report, 216; settlement, 496. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

National Syndicate of the Employees of 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: repre- 
sentation vote, 287; rejected, 395. 

Operating Engineers: rejected, 395. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks: representa- 
tion vote, 286; granted, 395. 

Royal Commission on Health Services 
Report (Volume 1), 658. 



Safety, Industrial 

Chief Inspector of Factories annual report 

(1962). BRITAIN: 476. 
N.B. Industrial Safety Act: new regulations, 

962. 
Ont. Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: 

regulations, 142. 
Ont. Industrial Safety Act (revision of Factory, 
Shop and Office Building Act) : regulations, 
960. 1003. 
Proposed legislation. CANADA: 96. 
Saguenay Terminals Limited 
Disputes: 

Le Syndicat National des Debardeurs de la 
Baie des Ha! Ha! Inc.: CO. appointed, 
882. 
Le Syndicat National des Employes Salaries 
de Saguenay Terminals Limited: CO. 
appointed, 882. 



St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 
Certification application: 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
716; granted, 797. 
Dispute: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
CO. appointed, 289; settlement, 496. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Welland Canal Construction Council: 
granted, 797. 

School Attendance 

Sask. School Attendance Act: amendment, 1071. 

Scientific Employees See Professional Man- 
power 

D. S. Scott Employee Association 
Certification application: 
D. S. Scott Transport Limited: 797; rejected, 
876. 

Scott International Truck Lines Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: 877; rejected, 877. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited 
Certification application: 

Seafarers: 799; representation vote, 987. 
D. S. Scott Transport Limited 
Certification application : 

D. S. Scott Employee Association: 797; 
rejected, 876. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 

rejected, 876. 
Teamsters: rejected, 876. 

Scotton, Clifford A., Canadian Labour Con- 
gress 

Liaison officer, Secretary-Treasurer, Union 
Label Department, appointment, 644. 

Seafarers' International Union of Canada 
Banks, Hal C, removal from presidency by 

Board of Trustees of the Maritime Trans- 
portation Unions, 260. 
Canadian Marine Officers' Union, formation, 

770. 
Certification applications: 

Agence Maritime Inc. (unlicensed person- 
nel): 877; representation vote, 1105. 

Agence Maritime Inc. (marine engineers) : 
1107; withdrawn, 1108. 

Beaucage, Jos.: application for revocation, 
288; granted, 395. 

Chayer, Albert G.: application for revoca- 
tion, 288; granted, 395. 

Johnstone Shipping Limited: 878; repre- 
sentation vote, 987; rejected, 1106. 

La Cie de Navigation du Golfe Ltee: 878; 
rejected, 988. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal): ap- 
plication for revocation, 288; granted, 395. 

Norlake Steamships Company Limited: 799; 
representation vote, 876; granted, 986. 

North Shipping and Transportation Limited 
(marine engineers): 1107; withdrawn, 1108. 



XXXII 



INDEX 



North Shipping and Transportation (unlicensed 
personnel): 799; representation vote, 1105. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (marine engineers): 
1107. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (unlicensed person- 
nel): 799; representation vote, 1105. 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited: withdrawn, 
1108. 

Polaris Shipping Limited: 799; rejected, 987. 

Quebec Cartier Mining Company: 574; repre- 
sentation vote, 797; granted, 876. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited: 799; rep- 
resentation vote, 987. 

Superior Aggregates Limited: 878; granted, 
1105. 

Sutcliffe Shipping Company Limited: 797; 
granted, 876. 

Swiftsure Towing Company Limited: 988; 
rejected, 1106. 

Trans-World Chartering Limited: 495; repre- 
sentation vote, 573; granted. 715. 

Verreault Navigation Incorporated: 798; re- 
jected, 987. 
Disputes: 

B.C. Towboat Owners Association: CO. ap- 
pointed, 1108. 

Canadian Dredge and Dock Company Lim- 
ited: CO. appointed, 1108. 

Canadian Lake Carriers Negotiating Commit- 
tee (23 companies) : CO. appointed, 717. 

Canadian Lake Carriers Negotiating Com- 
mittee (26 companies): CO. appointed, 717. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (British 
Columbia Coast Steamship Service): CO. 
appointed, 397; settlement, 575. 

Marine Industries Limited: CO. appointed, 
1108. 

McNamara Marine Limited: CO. appointed, 
1108. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 495; settlement, 575. 

J. P. Porter Company Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 1108. 

Quebec Cartier Mining Company: CO. ap- 
pointed, 1108. 
Intervener, certification applications: 

La Compagnie de Navigation Du Golfe Ltee 
(unlicensed personnel): 986; granted, 1105. 

Orleans Navigation Inc. (unlicensed person- 
nel) : withdrawn, 988. 

Polaris Shipping Limited (unlicensed person- 
nel) : representation vote, 986. 

Verreault Navigation Inc. (unlicensed per- 
sonnel) : rejected, 988. 
Maritime trusteeship and SIU — CLC views, 464; 

convention resolutions, 465. 
Turner, Charles. President, appointment, 260. 
Seamen 

Maritime Transportation Unions, Board of 

Trustees, to establish advisory council of 

seamen, 195. 

Seniority 

Sleeping car porters eligible as sleeping car 
conductors or dining car stewards — merger of 
minority groups, Canadian National Railways, 
262. 



Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway 
Certification applications: 
Locomotive Engineers: unit of locomotive 

engineers and helpers: 574; granted, 715. 
Railroad Trainmen: unit of yard conductors 

and yard brakemen: 574; granted, 715. 
Railway Running Trades: operating employ- 
ees: 574; rejected, 715. 

Intervener, certification applications: 
Locomotive Engineers: rejected, 715. 
Railroad Trainmen: rejected, 715. 
Railway Running Trades: locomotive engineers 

and helpers: granted, 715. 
Railway Running Trades: unit of yard con- 
ductors and yard brakemen: granted, 715. 

Sheltered Employment See Rehabilitation 
Shipping 

Canada Shipping Act — Crew Accommodation 
Regulations, 592; Liquefied Petroleum Gas 
Regulations, 503. 

Financial Administration Act: regulations, 888. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc. 
Certification applications: 

Longshoremen (Local 273): application under 

Section 19, 39. 
Longshoremen (Local 1657): rejected, 127; 
reasons for judgment, 129. 

Dispute : 

Longshoremen: settlement, 215. 
Shops See Factories 
Skilled Manpower See Manpower 
Small Business Management 

"Management Accounting", course, Small Busi- 
ness Management Training Division, federal 
Departments of Labour, and Trade and Com- 
merce, 358. 

Pearson, Rt. Hon. L. B., Prime Minister of 
Canada, addresses graduates 99th and 100th 
courses, 1050. 

Program, federal-provincial, 94. 

"Purchasing for Small Manufacturers", five- 
session course, federal Department of Labour, 
184. 

Social Insurance 

Social Insurance Number project, 182. 
Social Security Programs Throughout the World, 
1964. UNITED STATES: 643. 

Social Work See Education; Rehabilitation 

Soo-Security Motorways Limited 

Dispute: 

Teamsters: CO. appointed, 131; settlement, 
289. 

South Africa 

Withdrawal from ILO, voluntary and unilateral 
secession, 284. 

Speedway Express Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 1107. 



INDEX 



XXXIII 



Steelworkers of America, United 
Certification applications: 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring (1963) Limited 
(linesmen) : 878. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring (1963) Limited 
(shed employees): 878. 

Kitimat Wharves Limited: 127; withdrawn, 
215. 
Disputes: 

Canadian Arsenals Limited (Small Arms Divi- 
sion) : CO. appointed, 131; settlement, 131. 

Clarke Steamship Company Limited: CO. 
appointed, 717; settlement, 805. 

Denison Mines Limited (District 6) : settle- 
ment, C.B. report, 132. 

Denison Mines Limited (Local 5980) : settle- 
ment, 215. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring (1963) Lim- 
ited: CO. appointed, 805. 

Terminus Maritime Inc.: CO. appointed, 
717. 

Kaiser Steel — USW pact, Long-Range Sharing 
Plan — employment stabilization, 101, 332; 
vacation plan coverage, 104; joint report, 546. 

Policy Conference, 475. 

Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America, Amalgamated Asso- 
ciation of 

Dispute: 
Ottawa Transportation Commission: CO. 
appointed, 289; settlement, 496. 

Strikes and Lockouts 
CLC views, 15. 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1075. 
Statistics: "G-Strikes and Lockouts" (monthly 
feature) 

Students See also University Graduates 

Canada Students Loans Act: regulations, 1001. 

summerhayes industrial and wood products 
Limited 

Certification application: 
Longshoremen: 1107. 
Sunday Observance See Legal Decisions 
Superior Aggregates Limited 
Certification application: 
Seafarers: 878; granted, 1105. 

Sutcliffe Shipping Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Seafarers: 797; granted, 876. 

Swiftsure Towing Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Seafarers: 988; rejected, 1106. 

Syndicat Catholique et National des Debar- 
deurs de Sorel Inc. 
Disputes: 

North- American Elevators Limited: CO. 
appointed, 289; C.B. appointed, 717; C.B. 
fully constituted, 805. 
. North- American Elevators Limited (mainte- 
nance employees) : CO. appointed, 397; 
settlement, 496. 



Taggart Service Limited 
Certification applications: 

Teamsters (Locals 91, 938, 106): 396; rep- 
resentation vote, 493; granted, 797; 
reasons for judgment, 800; application 
under Section 19 (2), 1108. 
Teamsters: Michael Tapp and Victor Rostad: 
application for revocation rejected, 988; 
reasons for judgment, 989. 

Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, International Broth- 
erhood of 

Certification applications: 

A and H Express Lines Limited: 288; 
granted, 395. 

Argosy Carriers (Eastern) Limited: 1107; 
withdrawn, 1108. 

Floyd Barkwell: application for revocation, 
1107. 

Boston and Rockland Transportation Com- 
pany Limited: 988. 

Bray, John L. (mail service) : rejected, 127. 

Canadian Great Western Express Limited: 
715; granted, 715. 

Cronkwright Transport Limited: 396; granted, 
493. 

Edwards Transport Limited: 878; withdrawn, 
1108. 

Empire Freightways (Midland Superior) 
Limited: 288; withdrawn, 397. 

Hubert Transport Inc.: rejected, 127. 

John Kron and Son Limited: application for 
revocation, 397; representation vote, 493; 
application for revocation granted, 573. 

Lakehead Freightways Limited (Sault Ste. 
Marie Terminal): 716; withdrawn, 717. 

Liquid Cargo Lines Limited: 495; repre- 
sentation vote, 573; granted, 715; appli- 
cation for revocation, 1107. 

Martel Express Limited: 39; rejected, 213. 

O'Connor Transport Limited: 39; withdrawn, 
129. 

Ottor Freightways Limited: 214; withdrawn, 
215. 

Piette Transport Inc.: CO. appointed, 397; 
settlement, 496. 

Reid's Moving and Storage Company Lim- 
ited: 397; granted, 493. 

Reimer Express Lines Limited: 717; rejected, 
876. 

Scott International Truck Lines Limited: 
877; rejected, 877. 

Speedway Express Limited: 1107. 

Taggart Service Limited: 396; representation 
vote, 493; granted, 797; reasons for judg- 
ment, 800; application under Section 19 
(2), 1108. 

Taggart Service Limited (Michael Tapp and 
Victor Rostad): application for revocation 
rejected, 988; reasons for judgment, 989. 

Tiger Transfer Limited: application for rev- 
ocation granted, 127. 

Tourist Services Limited: 128; withdrawn, 
129; 214; representation vote, 395; granted, 
493. 



XXXIV 



INDEX 



Transport D'Anjou Inc.: 39; representation 

vote, 213; rejected, 287. 
Van Kam Freightways Limited: 397; granted, 
493. 
Disputes: 
Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc.: CO. ap- 
pointed, 131; C.B. appointed, 215; C.B. 
fully constituted, 289; C.B. report, 720; 
strike action after Board procedure, 718; 
settlement, 806. 
H. W. Bacon Limited: CO. appointed, 882; 

C.B. appointed, 1109. 
Central Truck Lines: CO. appointed, 39; 
C.B. appointed, 131; C.B. fully constituted, 
216; settlement, 718; C.B. report, 722. 
Cronkwright Transport Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; 882. 
Leamington Transport (Western) Limited: 

CO. appointed, 805. 
Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau: 

CO. appointed, 717. 
Soo-Security Motorways Limited: CO. ap- 
pointed, 131; settlement, 289. 
Tourist Services Limited: CO. appointed, 
805; Minister refused to appoint C.B., 
1109. 
Intervener, certification applications: 
Rempel-Trail Transportation Limited: re- 
jected, 573. 
D. S. Scott Transport Limited: rejected, 876. 
H. M. Trimble and Sons, Ltd.: granted, 
876. 
Teamsters, trucking industry, first national la- 
bour contract. UNITED STATES: 97. 
Teamwork In Industry (monthly feature) 
Technical Employees See Professional Man- 
power 
Technicians See Radiology 
Technological Change See Automation 
Technological Development See Automation 
Technology See Automation 
Terminus Maritime Inc. 
Dispute: 
Steel workers: CO. appointed, 717. 
Texada Towing Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
granted, 493, 494. 

Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Pic- 
ture Machine Operators of the United 
States and Canada, International Alliance 
of 

Certification applications : 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: 716. 

Hector Broadcasting Company Limited: re- 
quest for review, 215; withdrawn, 288. 

Island Radio Broadcasting Company Limited: 
988; granted, 1105. 

Disputes: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: CO. 

appointed, 215; C.B. appointed, 882; C.B. 

fully constituted, 990. 
Hector Broadcasting Company Limited: CO. 

appointed, 215; settlement, 397. 



Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited 

Dispute : 

Longshoremen: CO. appointed, 397. 

Tiger Transfer Limited 
Certification application: 

Teamsters: application for revocation granted, 
127. 

Tips See Legal Decisions 
Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway 
Dispute : 
Associated Non-Operating Unions: C.B. ap- 
pointed, 289; C.B. fully constituted, 398; 
C.B. report, 576; settlement, 805. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners 
Disputes : 

Longshoremen (Local 1842): settlement, 131. 

Longshoremen (Local 1869): settlement, 40. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners Employees' 

Union: CO. appointed, 289; settlement, 

289. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners Employees' 
Union 
Dispute: 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners: CO. ap- 
pointed, 289; settlement, 289. 

Tourist Services Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 128; withdrawn, 129; 214; repre- 
sentation vote, 395; granted, 493. 
Dispute: 

Teamsters: CO. appointed, 805; Minister 
refused to appoint C.B., 1109. 

Trade and Commerce, Department of 

"Management Accounting" course, Small Busi- 
ness Management Training Division, federal 
Departments of Labour, and Trade and Com- 
merce, 358. 

Trade Schools 

B.C. Trade-Schools Regulation Act: amend- 
ment, 1071. 
N.B. Trade Schools Act: regulations, 62, 1003. 

Trade Training See Apprenticeship 
Trade Union Membership See Labour Unions 
Trades Union Congress (Great Britain) 
Meeting, 96th, 966, 969. 

Tradesmen's Qualification See Apprenticeship 
Traffic Employees' Association 
Dispute: 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada: CO. 
appointed, 40; settlement, 40. 

Training See also Construction Industry; Older 
Workers; Small Business Management 
Training 

Canadian Vocational Association, first national 
convention, 461. 

Federal-provincial Labour Conference, proceed- 
ings, 264. 

Few retraining programs successful — study of 
effects of automation. UNITED STATES: 
770. 



INDEX 



XXXV 



Jewish Vocational Service, cited for retraining 
unemployed, 5. 

National training survey, Department of Labor 
report. UNITED STATES: 545. 

N.S. heavy water plant. Deuterium of Canada 
Limited, training program, 848. 

"Training Girls in Industry." BRITAIN: 125. 

Training in industry program. CANADA: 354. 

Training programs, CCA views, 373. 

Vocational Training Methods for Older Workers 
in the French Railways, report, OECD Semi- 
nar, 1098. 
Trans-Canada Air Lines 

Dispute: 

Machinists: settlement, 132; C.B. report, 134. 

Trans-Lake Shipping Limited 
Dispute : 

Canadian Maritime Union: CO. appointed, 
882. 
Trans-World Chartering Limited 
Certification applications: 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild: 495; 

granted, 573. 
Mine Workers: representation vote, 573. 
Seafarers: 495; representation vote, 573; 
granted, 715. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Mine Workers: granted, 573; 715. 

TransAir Limited 
Certification application: 

Electrical Workers (Dew Line Division) : 878; 
rejected, 988. 
Disputes: 

Air Line Pilots: CO. appointed, 495. 

Flight Attendants: settlement, 289. 

Machinists: CO. appointed, 1108. 
Intervener, certification application: 

Air Line Pilots: rejected, 988. 

Transport D'Anjou Inc. 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 39; representation vote, 213; re- 
jected, 287. 

Transportation 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, national transpor- 
tation policy, 20. 

Transportation Workers' Union, Canadian 

Glengarry Transport Limited: 1107. 
Tremblay Express Limited 
Certification application: 

National Syndicate of the Employees of the 
Trucking Industry Saguenay Lake St. John 
Inc.: 288; withdrawn, 397. 

H. M. Trimble and Sons Limited 
Certification application: 

Professional Transport Workers' Union of 
Canada: 798; granted, 876. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Teamsters; granted, 876. 

Trucking Industry 

Teamsters, trucking industry, first national 
labour contract. UNITED STATES: 97. 



Turner, Charles, President, Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union of Canada 
Appointment, 260. 



U 



Unemployment See also Manpower; Training 
Action to improve existing machinery, federal 

Minister of Labour, 96. 
CLC, views, 15. 
CNTU, views, 270. 
Declines in 1963. BRITAIN: 544. 
Shorter work week no cure for unemployment, 

study, Cornell University, 100. 
Technological development and a "human scrap 
heap", remarks, U.S. Secretary of Labor 
W. Willard Wirtz, 545. 
Unemployment Insurance 
CCA, views, 373. 
CNTU, views, 271. 

Statistics: "E — Unemployment Insurance" 
(monthly feature) 

Unemployment Insurance Fund (monthly fea- 
ture) 
Unemployment Insurance Act 

Brief to federal Minister of Labour on Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act — submission by Asso- 
ciation of International Representatives of the 
Building and Construction Trades and the 
Canadian Construction Association, 770. 

CLC, views, 16. 

Decisions of Umpire — 
CUB 2262, 55 
CUB 2270, 149 
CUB 2271, 151 
CUB 2278, 222 
CUB 2280, 223 
CUB 2299, 316 
CUB 2303, 319 
CUB 2312, 507 
CUB 2315, 508 
CUB 2316. 414 
CUB 2318, 415 
CUB 2323, 599 
CUB 2324, 601 
CUB 2333, 728 
CUB 2362, 729 
CUB 2367, 813 
CUB 2371, 814 
CUB 2383, 1010 
CUB 2390, 1011 
CUB 2398, 1129 
CUB 2399, 1130 

Operation of (monthly report) 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 19. 
Unemployment Insurance Advisory Com- 
mittee 

Annual report (1964), 964. 
Unemployment Insurance Commission 

Murchison, C.A.L., Commissioner, retirement, 
937. 

National Employment Service — transfer of 
administration to Department of Labour 
implements recommendation of Gill Com- 
mittee of Inquiry, 258. 



XXXVI 



INDEX 



Pankhurst, Kenneth, Chief, Economic Research 

Division, appointment, 184. 
Social Insurance Number project, 182. 
Ward, Thomas B., Commissioner, appointment, 

544. 

Union Dues 
Supreme Court of Canada upholds validity of 
B.C. law banning use of union dues for 
political purposes, 41. 

Union Label 
CLC, Union Label Trades Department, fourth 
biennial convention, 475. 

Union Membership See Labour Unions 
Union Security See Union Shop 
Union Shop 

Que. Labour Code: provisions, 1073. 

Union shop most popular form union security. 
UNITED STATES: 771. 

United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricul- 
tural Implement Workers of America, 
International Union See Auto Workers 

United Keno Hill Mines Limited 
Dispute : 
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; settlement, 805. 

United Nations 

Canadian contributions, 1965, to UN Special 
Fund, UN Expanded Programme for Tech- 
nical Assistance, 1052. 

Universities See Cornell University; Educa- 
tion; McGill University 

University Research Grants 
Labour Department — University Research Pro- 
gram (1964-65). CANADA: 934. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 
Certification application: 

Canadian Maritime Union: 495; granted, 
573. 
Dispute: 

Canadian Maritime Union: CO. appointed, 
882. 



Vacations See also Hours of Work 
Canada Labour (Standards) Code, provisions, 

1058. 
Kaiser Steel — USW pact broadens vacation 

plan coverage. UNITED STATES: 104. 
N.B. Vacation Pay Act: regulations, 1065. 
Ont. High Court — hold employee may sue for 

vacation pay owed him under collective 

agreement, 46. 

Van Kam Freightways Limited 
Certification application: 
Teamsters: 397; granted, 493. 



Vancouver Barge and Transportation Limited 
Dispute : 

Longshoremen and Warehousemen: CO. 
appointed, 495; settlement, 717. 

Vancouver Harbour Employees Association 
Intervener, certification application: 

National Harbours Board, Vancouver: re- 
jected, 573. 

Vancouver Tug Boat Company Limited 
Certification application: 

Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
granted, 127. 

Verreault Navigation Inc. 
Certification applications: 

Canadian Union of Employees of Verreault 

Navigation Inc.: 878; rejected, 988. 
Seafarers: 798; rejected, 987. 
Intervener, certification application: 
Seafarers: rejected, 988. 

Veteran Transfer Limited 
Certification application: 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 
1107. 

Visiting Homemaker See Women's Bureau 
Vocational Guidance See Mining 
Vocational Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 
Vocational Training See Training 



W 



Wage Schedules 

Wage schedules prepared and contracts con- 
taining fair wage schedules awarded, by fed- 
eral Department of Labour (monthly 
feature) 

Wages and Salaries 

Financial Administration Act: Prevailing Rate 
Employees General Regulations. CANADA: 
52. 

Labour market developments (1963). CAN- 
ADA: 105, 106. 

Man. Construction Industry Wages Act: regu- 
lations, 1070. 

Monthly Salary Rates in Hospitals, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 261. 

Nurses — collective action to improve salaries 
and working conditions. CANADA: 360. 

Ont. High Court rules that tips given to a 
waitress are part of wages under Minimum 
Wage Act, 48. 

Scientific and technical professions, annual 
earnings, 1963. CANADA: 1020. 

Statistics: "C — Employment, Hours and Earn- 
ings (monthly feature) 

2.7 million U.S. workers receive increases 
(1963), 207. 



INDEX 



XXXVII 



U.S. labour, business, advised to avoid wage 

and price rises, President's Economic Report 

to Congress, 186. 
Wage increases, 1963, survey, British Ministry 

of Labour, 283. 
Wage increases, UNITED STATES: (1963), 

408; (1964), 1093. 
Wage settlements, 1964. UNITED STATES: 

874. 

Ward, Thomas B., Unemployment Insurance 

Commissioner 

Appointment, 544. 
Waterman's Service (Scott) Limited 

Certification application: 
Longshoremen: 1107. 

Welfare See Blind Persons Allowances; 
Canadian Welfare Council; Disabled Per- 
sons Allowances; General Assistance; Old 
Age Assistance; Public Welfare 

Welland Canal Construction Council 
Intervener, certification application: 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority: granted, 797. 

Western Manitoba Broadcasters Limited 
Certification application: 

Radio and Television Employees: 288; granted, 
286. 
Dispute: 

Radio and Television Employees: CO. ap- 
pointed, 717; C.B. appointed, 1109. 

Western Ontario Broadcasting Company Lim- 
ited 
Certification application: 
Broadcast Employees: 988; granted, 1105. 

Western Stevedoring Company Limited 
Certification application: 
Longshoremen and Warehousemen: 575; re- 
jected, 876; reasons for judgment, 879. 

Western Tug and Barge Limited 
Certification application: 
Railway, Transport and General Workers: 988; 
granted, 1105. 
Winter House Building Incentive Program See 
House Building Incentive Program 

Winter Works See Municipal Winter Works 
Incentive Program 

Wirtz, Willard, United States Secretary of Labor 
AFL-CIO convention, address, 25. 
On technological development and a "human 
scrap heap", 545. 

Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancouver) Limited 
Certification application: 

Longshoremen and Warehousemen: 575; re- 
jected, 876; reasons for judgment. 879. 

Women in Industry 

Canadian Conference on the Family, meeting 
sponsored by Governor-General and Madame 
Vanier, 567. 



Conference on Divisions Between Men's and 
Women's Work — sponsored by Women's Bu- 
reau, federal Department of Labour, 357. 

Employment of African women, 985. 

Employment of women, proposed ILO Recom- 
mendation, 686. 

Pepin, Miss Germaine, appointed by Montreal 
City Council to top classification in municipal 
service, 937. 

Socio-medical problems of working women, 200. 

Tenth anniversary, Women's Bureau, federal 
Department of Labour, 772. 

"Training Girls in Industry". BRITAIN: 125. 

Women in the labour force in 1963. CANADA: 
279. 

Women Workers and the CNTU, 1099. 

Women Workers in a Changing World, ILO 
report (1963) 387; (1964) 490. 

Working Women in Australia, 34. 

Women's Bureau, federal Department of Labour 
Occupation of Visiting Homemaker, report, 791. 

Women's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor 
Anderson, Miss Mary, Director, death of, 104. 

Woods, Prof. H. D., McGill University 

Named chairman of committee appointed to 
review Labour Relations and Employment 
Standards Acts (Manitoba), 461. 

Working Conditions See Labour Conditions 

Workmen's Compensation See also Accidents, 
Industrial 

Changes in provincial laws in 1964, 856. 

Man. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 856. 

N.B. Workmen's Compensation Act: operation 
of taverns, 141. 

Nfld. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 856. 

N.S. Workmen's Compensation Act: amendment, 
856. 

Ont. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 222, 856. 

P.E.I. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 856. 

Que. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 856; regulations, 147; Schedule 2 addi- 
tion, 62. 



Yorke and Son Limited 

Dispute: 

Longshoremen and Warehousemen: CO. ap- 
pointed, 495; settlement, 575. 

Youth Allowances Act 
Regulations, 889. 

Youth Employment See Employment 



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Professional Manpower Reports 

1. Trends in Professional Manpower Supplies and Requirements (out of 

print) L2-2001 

2. Immigrants in Scientific and Technical Professions in Canada. L2-2002 

3. Canadians Studying in the United States for Degrees in Science, 
Engineering, Agriculture, Architecture and Veterinary Medicine, 1955-56. L2-2003 

4. Recent Changes in Engineering Manpower Requirements and Supplies in 

Canada. L2-2004 

5. Employment Outlook for Professional Personnel in Scientific and Tech- 
nical Fields, 1958-1960 (superseded by Bulletin No. 8) L2-2005 

6. The Early Post-Graduate Years in the Technical and Scientific Professions 

in Canada. L2-2006 

7. Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources in Canada: Their 

Earnings, Employment and Education, 1957. L2-2007 

(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department- of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 



R. M. Dyke 



Editor, French Edition 



Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 



Vol. LXIV, No. 1 CONTENTS January 1964 

Dept. of Labour Today: Labour-Management Co-operation 2 

50 Years Ago This Month 3 

Notes of Current Interest 4 

Latest Labour Statistics 7 

Distribution of Union Membership in Canada, 1963 8 

Annual Labour Briefs 14 

Chamber of Commerce Recommendations to Cabinet 22 

5th Biennial Convention of the AFL-CIO 24 

Industrial Fatalities during Third Quarter, 1963 28 

Employment and Unemployment, December 30 

Rehabilitation: Sheltered Employment Expanding 32 

Older Workers: Extend Older Worker Incentive Program .... 33 

Women's Bureau: Working Women in Australia 34 

Collective Bargaining Review: 

Collective Bargaining Scene 35 

Teamwork in Industry 38 

Certification and Conciliation: 

Certification Proceedings 39 

Conciliation Proceedings 39 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 41 

Recent Regulations, Federal and Provincial 52 

Unemployment Insurance — NES: 

Monthly Report on Operation of the Act 54 

Monthly Report on Placement Operations 55 

Decisions of the Umpire 55 

Wage Schedules 58 

Price Indexes , 63 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library .. 64 

LABOUR STATISTICS 69 



Correspondence — Address letters dealing with editorial matters to the Editor, those dealing with 
subscriptions to the Circulation Manager. Subscriptions — Canada: $3 per year, single copies 
50 cents each; all other countries: $5 per year, single copies 50 cents each. Send remittance by 
cheque or post office money order, payable to the Receiver-General of Canada, to The Queen's 
Printer, % Superintendent of Government Publications, Ottawa. All subscriptions payable in 
advance. Special Group Subscription Offer — Five or more annual subscriptions, $1.50 per 
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Circulation Manager. Bound Volumes — $5 per copy delivered in Canada, $7 per copy to other 
countries. Change of Address — Please attach label showing previous address. 
73306-3—1 



Department of Labour Today 



Labour-Management Co-operation 



Labour-Management Committees in operation across the country 
now total 1,811 and represent 506,514 workers, a gain of 62 
committees and 10,000 workers over totals for previous year 



More than 500,000 workers in Canadian 
industry are now represented on Labour- 
Management Committees across the country. 
A statement issued last month gave the 
exact total as 506,514 workers — an increase 
of almost 10,000 over the total in 1962. 

At October 31, 1963, the number of 
LMCs operating in industry was 1,811, an 
increase of 62 over last year's total. 

Active promotion of these committees is 
conducted by the Labour-Management Co- 
operation Service of the Department. 

Primarily concerned with bettering em- 
ployer-employee relations and improving 
plant operations, the committees provide 
labour and management with an opportunity 
to meet on a regular basis for joint discus- 
sion of mutual problems other than those 
dealt with in collective bargaining. 

Topics discussed at LMC meetings in- 
clude automation and technological change, 
production, trade, morale of the work force, 
unemployment and layoffs, quality of 
products, union-management objectives, 
competition in industry, employee welfare, 
safety, fire prevention and care of equip- 
ment. 

Although all of these topics are not 
discussed by all committees, there is a 
steadily increasing use of joint consultation 
as a means of solving problems affecting 
the welfare of both labour and industry as 
a whole. 

The largest number of committees, as of 
October 31, 1963, was in the manufacturing 
industries, with a total of 1,183 committees, 
representing 308,997 workers. Highest 
among these industries was the iron and 
iron products group, with 295 committees, 
representing 82,492 workers. 

The number of committees and of workers 
represented in the manufacturing industries 
were: 

Textile products 47 13,007 

Rubber & its products 21 10,436 

Pulp, paper & paper products 118 46,019 

Printing & publishing 17 3,124 

Lumber & its products 74 11,213 

Edible plant products 83 17,086 

Leather & its products 21 4,900 

Edible animal & sea products 68 14,025 

Iron & its products 295 82,492 

Non-ferrous metals & their 

products 56 19,879 

Clay, glass & stone products . 85 17,128 



Non-metallic mineral products 24 4,524 

Tobacco products 6 5,002 

Beverages 37 9,210 

Electric light & power 99 9,563 

Chemical & allied products .... 64 14,561 

Electrical apparatus 54 24,675 

Miscellaneous 14 2,153 

Next after the manufacturing industries 
came the transportation industry, with 153 
committees representing 80,475 workers. It 
was followed by the service industry, with 
189 committees and 66,236 workers. 

The number of committees and of workers 
represented in industries other than manu- 
facturing were: 

Transportation 153 80,475 

Service 189 66,236 

Communications 160 30,802 

Trade— Retail & Wholesale ... 87 8,782 

Mining 30 8,591 

Construction 4 1,407 

Logging 4 890 

Finance 1 334 

In the transportation industry, railways 
had 111 committees, representing 64,348 
workers, the rest being accounted for by 
air, street railways, and forwarding and 
storage, with 42 committees involving 
16,127 workers. 

The mining industry had 7 committees in 
the metallic-ores group, with 5,060 workers 
represented, and 23 committees and 531 
workers in other non-metallic minerals. 

Committees were operating in all 10 
provinces, with the number of committees 
and of workers represented as follows: 

Newfoundland 9 3,142 

Prince Edward Island 6 1,278 

Nova Scotia 30 11,749 

New Brunswick 23 11,455 

Quebec 468 185,631 

Ontario 793 187,155 

Manitoba 112 30,446 

Saskatchewan 103 15,314 

Alberta 127 37,045 

British Columbia 140 23,299 

The union affiliations of the bargaining 
agencies in plants in which the committees 
were operating were: 

Canadian Labour Congress . 1,366 369,224 
International Unions 

Unaffiliated 87 13,819 

Confederation of National 

Trade Unions 106 40,319 

Others 252 83,152 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 964 



From the Labour Gazette, January 1914 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Except for usual seasonal decline during winter months, the 
general trend oj wages during 1913 was upward. Nine-hour day 
introduced at Ford in Windsor and at silver mines at Cobalt 



The general trend of wages in 1913 was 
upward, but in those days in Canada a 
seasonal reduction during the winter months 
was usual, especially for casual labour. 

The January 1914 Labour Gazette 
reported that wages had continued to in- 
crease during the first three quarters of 
1913, the greatest number of changes tak- 
ing place in April, May and June, But "the 
usual tendency toward lower wages was 
evident during December." 

Unskilled labour was plentiful, and in 
Ontario and the western provinces partic- 
ularly, labourers were working at lower 
wages than previously. In Quebec and the 
Maritime Provinces, there was a plentiful 
supply of labour, and, owing to the scarcity 
of work, "farmers were able to secure 
help under contract for a year." 

The nine-hour day was introduced at 
Ford Motor Company at Windsor, and for 
1,200 silver miners at Cobalt. The working 
hours of operatives at the Dominion 
Textile Company's works were reduced from 
58 to 55 a week. 

Wage Increases 

Some employees of the CPR received 
substantial wage increases during 1913. 
Engineers on lines east of Cartier gained an 
increase of 10 per cent, and an increase of 
the same proportion went to some 9,000 
men employed in the company's mechanical 
departments in Eastern Canada. 

Some 2,500 street railway men in 
Montreal got an increase of 1 cent an hour. 

"Overground labourers at Westville to 
the number of 500 were given an increase in 
wages of about 10 per cent during June." 

Shorter Hours 

A number of manufacturing plants were 
reported to be working shorter hours. This 
apparently meant a permanent shortening 
of hours, since the statement was coupled 
with the report of the nine-hour day for 
300 Ford employees; previously they had 
worked a ten-hour day. 

The reduction in working hours at 
Dominion Textile was as a result of legisla- 
tion enacted during 1912. The rate of wages 
remained the same as previously. About 
6,000 workers in all were affected by this 
change. 



Though the word "automation" had not 
been coined in 1913, evidence that techno- 
logical change was going on is contained 
in the following "Traffic on the Michigan 
Central Railway was fairly heavy, but long 
trains were responsible for a reduction in 
the number of crews and service. Eight or 
ten crews were laid off during the month 
[December], which is unusual at this time of 
year . . ." 

Railway Building 

Railway building had been going on apace 
in 1913. Canadian Pacific built 1,700 miles 
of line west of Fort William during the 
year. "Grading was carried on on 550 
miles of new line exclusive of sidings and 
terminal work, and 262 miles of double- 
tracking on the main line." 

Work on the Canadian Northern 
between Ottawa and Toronto was finished, 
and it was announced that a passenger 
and freight service over the new line 
would commence early in 1914. 

"The Canadian Northern Railway has 
steel laid up to the site of its Calgary 
terminal and will open its freight and pas- 
senger service next month connecting Cal- 
gary directly with Saskatoon ... A start 
was made on the construction of the 
Alberta and Great Waterways Railway from 
Edmonton to Fort McMurray during 
December. A considerable number of men 
will be employed on this line." 

Elsewhere the Gazette said: "Features of 
the year were the completion of the Eastern 
division of the National Transcontinental 
Railway between Winnipeg and Quebec, 
and the piercing of the mountain at 
Montreal by the Canadian Northern 
Railway." 

This journal quoted the Canadian Rail- 
way and Marine World as authority for the 
preliminary estimate that in all, 3,144.59 
miles of new track had been laid in Canada 
in 1913 by 20 railway companies. This did 
not include 254.3 miles of second track 
laid by the CPR. Of the total length of 
track, the Northern Ontario Railway laid 
590; the Canadian Northern 480.96; the 
Canadian Pacific, 683.4; and the Grand 
Trunk Pacific, 600. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3— U 



• JANUARY 1964 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Appoint 25 Members of Economic Council of Canada 



The appointment of 25 members to the 
Economic Council of Canada was announced 
by the Prime Minister just before Christmas. 
Dr. John J. Deutsch had been appointed 
Chairman of the Council in September, 
and shortly afterwards, J. L. E. Couillard 
and Arthur J. R. Smith had been named 
as directors. These three are full-time posts. 

Among the 25 part-time members are six 
representatives of labour organizations: 
Claude Jodoin, President of the Canadian 
Labour Congress; Marcel Pepin, General 
Secretary of the Confederation of National 
Trade Unions; A. R. Gibbons, Secretary of 
the National Legislative Committee, Inter- 
national Railway Brotherhoods; Stanley A. 
Little, President, Canadian Union of Public 
Employees; William Ladyman, Vice-Presi- 
dent, International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers; and William Mahoney, Canadian 
Director of the United Steelworkers. 

The other members of the Council in- 
clude representatives of industry and busi- 
ness, agriculture, and various organizations. 



Dr. Deutsch, who at the time of his ap- 
pointment to the Council was Vice-Principal 
of Queen's University, is an economist who 
began his career as a research assistant at 
the Bank of Canada in 1936. He served on 
the Rowell-Sirois Commission from 1937 
to 1940, and lectured in economics at 
Queen's from 1940 to 1942, when he be- 
came special assistant to the Under-Secre- 
tary of State for External Affairs. Dr. 
Deutsch entered the Department of Finance 
in 1946 and became an Assistant Deputy 
Minister of the Department in 1953. He 
later held posts at the University of British 
Columbia and Queen's University. He has 
served on a number of Royal Commissions 
and was economic adviser to the Special 
Senate Committee on Manpower and Em- 
ployment in 1960. 

When appointed to the Council, Mr. 
Couillard was Canadian ambassador to Nor- 
way and Iceland; Mr. Smith was secretary- 
treasurer and director of research of the 
Private Planning Association of Canada. 



31,000 Graduates in 1963 Exceed Total in 1962 by 17 Per Cent 



Graduates from Canadian universities in 
1963 are estimated to have totalled approxi- 
mately 31,000, according to an annual sur- 
vey of the supply of and demand for uni- 
versity graduates prepared by the National 
Employment Service. The total was 17 per 
cent higher than that of 1962 graduates. 

The total was made up of 27,000 students 
who graduated with first degrees or equiva- 
lent diplomas, and 3,450 who received 
graduate degrees: 3,100 masters and 350 
doctors. A total of close to 37,000 is ex- 
pected in 1964. 

Graduating classes may be expected to 
expand in the coming years, the NES points 
out, as enrolments at Canadian universities 
and colleges continue their rapid increase. 
The full-time enrolment of 141,388 students 
in 1962-63 represented an increase of 10 per 
cent over the previous year, and with the 
same rate of increase the number of full- 
time students in 1963-64 will be about 
156,000. 

Starting salaries for new graduates con- 
tinued to rise in 1963, the most substantial 
increases being in mathematics, pharmacy, 
commerce and business administration, com- 
merce for C. A. articles, and economics and 
political science. 

The increases ranged from 5 per cent for 
graduates in economics and political 
science to 10 per cent for those in mathe- 
matics. In engineering, salaries were from 



1.5 to 3.5 per cent higher than in the 
previous year, the largest increase being in 
metallurgical engineering. 



The demand for scientists and engineers 
in the United States is expected to rise by 
nearly 800,000 during the 1960's, from the 
1,157,000 employed at the beginning of the 
decade — January 1960 — to 1,954,000 at the 
end, 1970, according to projections by the 
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

The largest increase will be in the demand 
for mathematicians, which is expected to 
rise to more than double the present 
demand, the Bureau says. 

Physicists, medical scientists and biologi- 
cal scientists will come next in the rate of 
growth. They will have to increase in num- 
ber by nearly 100 per cent to keep up with 
the demand, followed by scientists (73 per 
cent increase) and engineers (67 per cent). 
Requirements for chemists — now the largest 
profession in numbers — will increase at a 
rather slower rate than the average for all 
scientists. 

Report on Changing Occupational 

Composition of Labour Force 

A new publication of the Department of 
Labour, Occupational Trends in Canada, 
1931 to 1961, presents comparable data on 
changes in the occupational structure of the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Canadian labour force during two periods, 
the three decades 1931 to 1961 and the 
decade 1951 to 1961. 

In comparison with the changes that took 
place over the whole period, the foreword 
to the booklet points out, the changes that 
occurred during the later decade were 
significant. 

The publication is Report No. 11 in the 
Research Program on the Training of 
Skilled Manpower but is the beginning of 
a new series of studies into the changing 
occupational composition of the Canadian 
labour force. 

13 Occupational Groups 

The study, which deals with 13 main 
occupational groups and 117 selected 
occupations, and which contains a number 
of tables and charts, is based on data ob- 
tained in the decennial censuses taken 
during the period. 

The report is divided into two parts. Part 
I deals with the labour force as a whole; 
Part II, with the female labour force. 

The study presents data on the occupa- 
tional structure of the labour force for 
each of the four censuses during the period, 
giving the number in each occupation, the 
percentage of the labour force in each oc- 
cupation, and the percentage change over 
the two periods. 

The provision of the data supplied in this 
bulletin is only the first step in the projected 
series of studies, the report says. The next 
step will be to show the changes that are 
taking place in the distribution of the 
various occupations within each of the main 
groups of industries. "It is only through this 
intermediate stage that occupational require- 
ments can be linked to general economic 
developments," the report says. 

The report was prepared by the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour. Copies may be ob- 
tained from the Queen's Printer, Ottawa. 

Jewish Vocational Service, Toronto 
Cited for Retraining of Unemployed 

A national social welfare award has been 
won by the Jewish Vocational Service, 
Toronto, for conducting a training program 
under which more than 200 unemployed 
men have been prepared for jobs as build- 
ing caretakers. 

The award is the honourable mention 
citation in the William J. Shroder Memorial 
Award Competition sponsored by the Coun- 
cil of Jewish Federations and Welfare 
Funds, an association of 217 Jewish wel- 
fare organizations throughout the United 
States and Canada. This is the first time that 
a Canadian agency has been cited since the 
Shroder Award was established in 1952. 



The program of training in building 
maintenance services was started by the 
Jewish Vocational Service in 1962 as part 
of its plan of retraining for other jobs 
workers displaced by technology and auto- 
mation. The program is being financed by 
federal-provincial funds administered by the 
Toronto Board of Education under the 
Technical and Vocational Training Assist- 
ance Act (Program 5). 

The JVS building maintenance course 
provides six weeks of training for a wide 
range of jobs, including those of building 
superintendent, maintenance worker, clean- 
ing specialist and janitor. The course teaches 
such things as care of floors, shampooing 
carpets, washing walls, looking after boilers, 
fire control and property protection. It also 
includes group counselling sessions on atti- 
tudes toward work, labour market informa- 
tion and ways of finding work. 

In order to make the course as congenial 
as possible to adults, emphasis is placed on 
demonstrations and practice rather than on 
classroom discussions. There are no age 
limits or educational requirements, and no 
restrictions as to race, religion or nationality. 
75% Find Jobs 

So far, 214 men have successfully com- 
pleted the training program, and about 75 
per cent of these have found jobs. The 
selection of trainees and finding work for 
them after they have been trained is carried 
out with the help of the National Employ- 
ment Service. 

CLC Commissions Eugene Forsey 
To Write Union History 

As part of its contribution to the celebra- 
tion of Canada's Centenary of Confedera- 
tion, the Canadian Labour Congress has 
commissioned Dr. Eugene Forsey, the 
director of its Research Department, to 
write a history of the trade union movement 
in Canada. Dr. Forsey, who has been closely 
connected with the Canadian labour move- 
ment since 1942, has already begun research 
into original documents. He has appealed 
to the unions to assist by providing him with 
their early records. 

Trustees Ban Unions' Defamatory 
Statements, Call Management Meeting 

Two actions were taken last month by 
the Board of Trustees of the Maritime 
Transportation Unions: 

— The unions under trusteeship were in- 
formed that in future, publications of any 
kind issued by them must be submitted to 
the Board for approval before being pub- 
lished or distributed. 

— The employers in the inland shipping 
industry were invited to arrange for a repre- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



sentive delegation to meet the trustees in the 
near future. In a directive sent on December 
4 to the unions, the Board said: 

"Publications, whether newspapers, maga- 
zines, bulletins, circulars, or otherwise, that 
contain defamatory references to other 
trade union leaders or members, partic- 
ularly officers and members of the mari- 
time unions under trusteeship, cannot be 
approved." 

The trustees said that they had no wish 
"to hinder or prevent fair competition 
between the unions under trusteeship." But 
it was their intention to see that the com- 
petition was "constructive and lawful, and 
that the literature in support thereof does 
not offend the law, particularly the law of 
defamation." 



The call for a meeting with the employers 
was issued in a letter sent on December 11 
to some 40 steamship, tugboat and dredge 
operators. More than 60 interviews had 
made it clear that one of the contributing 
factors at the root of the labour strife on 
the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River 
had been a serious failure on the part of 
management to carry out some of its 
responsibilities, the letter said. 

The object of the proposed meeting will 
be to lay the groundwork for a revision of 
labour-management relations in the inland 
shipping industry, and the letter mentions 
forthcoming collective bargaining negotia- 
tions as among the matters that need to be 
discussed by the trustees and the com- 
panies' representatives. 



In Parliament Last Month 



(page numbers refer to Hansard) 

Among the bills passed by the House dur- 
ing December were amendments to the 
Old Age Assistance Act, the Disabled Per- 
sons Act, the Blind Persons Act, the 
Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act, 
and the Railway Act. 

Bill C-125, to amend the Old Age Assis- 
tance Act, the Disabled Persons Act and 
the Blind Persons Act, increased the maxi- 
mum amount of assistance or allowance to 
$75 a month. It was introduced and given 
first reading on December 6 (p. 5519), sec- 
ond reading on December 10 (p. 5658) and 
third reading on December 12 (p. 5752). 

Bill C-124 to amend the Emergency Gold 
Mining Assistance Act, extended its applica- 
tion to the years 1964, 1965, 1966 and 1967. 
It, too, was introduced (p. 5510) and given 
first reading on December 6 (p. 5519). It 
was given second (p. 5610) and third 
reading on December 9 (p. 5619). 

Bill C-110, to amend the Railway Act, 
allowed certain grants to be made from 
the railway grade crossing fund for a fur- 
ther period of three years from January 31, 
1964. Introduced (p. 5071) and given first 
(p. 5079) and second reading on November 
25 (p. 5087), it was given third reading on 
November 26 (p. 5109). 

On December 6, the Minister of Tran- 
sport introduced a measure to authorize 
the implementation of certain recommenda- 
tions of the Royal Commission on Trans- 
portation with respect to the rationaliza- 
tion of branch lines and passenger train 
services; the fixing of freight rates under, 
and consistent with a national transportation 
policy suited to modern transportation 
conditions; the payment of certain subsidies; 
and other matters (p. 5510). 

The Department of Labour estimates 
relating to industrial relations activities 



were passed (p. 6162). These activities 
included the administration of the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act, 
the Canada Fair Employment Practices Act, 
the Female Employees Equal Pay Act, the 
Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act, the 
Annual Vacations Act, and regulations; and 
the promotion of labour-management co- 
operation. 

The first session of the 26th Parliament 
prorogued on December 21 (p. 6377). 
Opening on May 16, it had occupied 23 
weeks. 

During the session Parliament passed the 
Maritime Transportation Unions Trustees 
Act, amended the Technical and Vocational 
Training Assistance Act to increase support 
for the construction of training facilities and 
the provision of training, approved measures 
to stimulate industrial expansion through 
tax incentives, established the Economic 
Council of Canada, increased the number 
of members of the Atlantic Development 
Board and provided a capital development 
fund of $100,000,000, established a Depart- 
ment of Industry, adopted measures to 
provide tax incentives for industrial ex- 
pansion in areas of slow economic growth 
and serious and persistent unemployment, 
increased the pension paid under the Old 
Age Security Act to $75 a month from 
$65, and pension payments to those receiv- 
ing old age assistance and blindness and 
disability allowances by a like amount, in- 
creased the incentives to municipal winter 
works and expanded the construction of 
federal works during the winter, established 
a bonus to encourage the building of houses 
during the winter, and approved an experi- 
mental program to encourage the employ- 
ment and training of unemployed older 
workers. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949=100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000. 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 

New Residential Construction (b) 

Starts 

Completions 



December 
December 
December 
December 
December 

December 
December 
December 

December 
December 
December 
December 
December 
December 

December 
December 

October 
October 

\lst 9 mos.J 
f 1963 1 



December 
December 
December 



October 
October 
October 
October 
December 

October 
October 



November 
November 
November 
November 



December 
December 



6,774 
6,428 
581 
5,847 
5,325 

5,467 
807 
154 

346 

50 

130 



37 

40 

326 
20 

129.3 
119.2 

69,344 
34,730 



32 

4,341 

38,320 



$84.67 

$ 1.96 

41.3 

$80.93 

134.2 

144.7 
L.896.4 



210.7 
187.2 
190.9 
180.0 



- 0.4 

- 1.0 

- 5.2 

- 0.6 

- 0.6 

+15.2 
-48.8 
-12.5 

+14.2 
+11.1 
+17.1 
+18.7 
+ 2.8 
+11.1 

+14.0 
+17.6 

- 0.8 

- 0.9 



-27.3 
-29.9 
-24.9 



+ 0.5 
+ 1.0 
0.0 
+ 0.8 
+ 0.1 



0.5 
0.6 



+ 2.1 
+ 1.4 
+ 3.4 
- 0.3 



3.0 
4.4 
0.2 
4.8 
4.4 



- 2.1 

+19.7 
+15.8 

-16.4 
-28.6 
-15.6 

- 4.3 
-27.5 
-13.0 

-15.8 
-25.9 

+ 3.1 

+ 2.8 

+22.6 
+21.8 



+10.3 
+19.2 
-32.4 



3.7 

3.7 
0.0 
3.8 
1.7 

2.2 
7.5 



+ 8.3 
+ 7.8 
+ 9.4 
+ 6.3 



(a) Estimates of the labo ir force, the employed and the unemployed, are from The Labour Force, 
a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics which also contains additional details of 
the characteristics of the labour force, together with definitions and explanatory notes. 

(b) Centres of 5,000 population or more. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Industrial and Geographic Distribution 

of Union Membership in Canada, 1963 

Membership statistics obtained from individual union locals 
are broken down by industry, province and labour market area 



Union membership in Canada at the 
beginning of 1963 totalled 1,449,200, ac- 
cording to survey returns received by the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour directly from na- 
tional and international union headquarters, 
central labour congresses, and independent 
local organizations. This total represents a 
net increase of 26,000 over the previous 
year's figure. 

The data obtained from the survey were 
published in the 1963 edition of Labour 
Organizations in Canada, a handbook that 
contains statistical tables on union member- 
ship and a comprehensive directory of la- 
bour organizations, with names of their 
principal officers and publications and the 
distribution of their locals. The statistical 
data contained in the handbook are Canada- 
wide totals broken down by congress 
affiliation and type and size of union. 

The tables on the following pages supple- 
ment the information included in Labour 
Organizations in Canada by showing the 
distribution of union membership in Canada 
by industry, province and labour market 
area. The tables are based on information 
obtained in a separate survey directed, at 
the beginning of the year, to individual 
local unions across the country. In this sur- 
vey, each local union was requested to 
report the total number of its members, 
and the industry and location in which all 
or most of them were employed. 

Table 1 gives a distribution of union 
membership by industry on the basis of 
the DBS Standard Industrial Classification 
(1960). The data are shown for the most 
part on the "major group" level. In in- 
stances where more detail could usefully be 
provided, care was taken to adhere to com- 
binations of recognized industrial sub- 
groups. For the railway industry, which is 
not further subdivided in the standard 
classification, subtotals are provided to 
show the division of membership between 
the operating and non-operating sectors. 

Included as a supplement to the first 
table, Table 2 shows in alphabetical order 
the names of international and national 
unions or independent local organizations 
that account for more than one tenth of 
the union membership within the industry 



groups. The table thus does not necessarily 
show all organizations active within any 
particular industry group, but only those 
having more than 10 per cent of the organ- 
ized workers in the group. 

In Table 3 union membership in Canada 
is broken down by province, and Table 4 
shows its distribution by labour market 
area. The boundaries of the labour market 
areas dealt with in Table 4 are broader 
than those of the centres for which the 
areas are named. In general, a labour mar- 
ket area corresponds to the area served by 
a local office of the National Employment 
Service. In some cases labour market areas 
consist of two or more NES local office 
areas. These composite areas are identified 
by an asterisk and the local office areas 
they comprise are listed in the Appendix 
to Table 4. 

Locals accounting for just over 7 per 
cent of the membership total indicated that 
their members were dispersed throughout 
several locations in different areas or prov- 
inces. Since these locals and their member- 
ship could not be allocated to any one area 
or province, they have been classified to 
"two or more provinces" or "two or more 
areas" in Tables 3 and 4. 

At the beginning of 1963 more than 
7,000 union locals with a total of one and 
one-half million members were active in 
Canada, and although the survey met with 
a generally excellent response, not all of 
the locals supplied the required data. The 
number of locals from which no informa- 
tion was obtained appears in Tables 1 and 
3. The corresponding entry for these locals 
in the membership column in Tables 1 and 
3 represents the difference between the 
Canada-wide membership total based on 
the survey of union headquarters mentioned 
earlier and the membership reported by the 
responding locals. 

The uneven quality of the basic source 
data and the practical difficulties inherent 
in the processing of the returns necessarily 
reduce the accuracy of the results. The sta- 
tistics presented here, therefore, indicate 
only in a broad and approximate way the 
industrial and geographic distribution of 
organized labour in Canada. 



The information for this article was obtained by the Collective Bargaining Section 
of the Economics and Research Branch from local union secretaries, whose co-operation 
is gratefully acknowledged. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE 1— UNION MEMBERSHIP BY INDUSTRY, 1963 

Based on Standard Industrial Classification (1960) 



Industry- 



Locals 



Membership 



Forestry* 

Fishing and Trapping 

Mines 

Metals 

Mineral fuels 

Non-metal 

Quarries 

Incidental services 

Manufacturing 

Food 

Beverages 

Tobacco products 

Rubber 

Leather 

Textiles 

Knitting mills 

Clothing 

Wood 

Furniture and fixtures 

Paper 

Printing and publishing 

Primary metals 

Metal fabricating 

Machinery 

Transportation equipment 

Electrical products 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Petroleum and coal products 

Chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing 

Construction 

Transportation and Utilities 

Air transport and incidental services . . . 
Water transport and incidental services 
Railway transport 

Running trades 

Non-operating employees 

Truck transport 

Buses and streetcars 

Other transport 

Storage 

Communication 

Power, gas and water 

Trade 

Finance 

Service Industries 

Education 

Health and welfare 

Recreational service 

Services to business 

Personal services 

Miscellaneous services 

Public Administration 

Federal administration 

Provincial administration 

Local administration 

Industry not reported 

No return 

Totals 



M 



173 

94 
38 
27 
12 
2 

2,312 

296 

63 

14 

35 

56 

123 

24 

100 

87 

53 

302 

191 

118 

219 

102 

123 

115 

121 

25 

90 

55 

522 

2,044 

70 

75 

1,060 

882 

728 

35 

54 

12 

23 

586 

129 

178 

10 

472 

113 
153 

78 

7 

109 

12 

599 

34 
68 

497 

22 
709 



39,800 
4,300 

51,000 

34,300 

9,200 

7,000 

400 

100 

589,500 

62,600 

9,300 

5,400 

12,700 

10,600 

31,500 

3,600 

41,100 

23,900 

8,300 

74,000 

29,700 

62,400 

35,700 

19,500 

72,300 

43,500 

18,600 

4,300 

15,200 

6,300 

147,200 

324,200 

7,200 

34,000 

134,500 

84,800 

100,200 

21,200 

19,000 

2,000 

5,000 

66,000 

35,300 

43,600 

800 

104,600 

9,900 

49,500 

19,700 

400 

22,600 

2,500 

84,609 

3,400 
16,400f 
64,800 

5,200 

54,400 



7,073 



1,449,200 



"Includes some sawmilling. 

tThe corresponding figure for 1962, shown as 25,100 in the March 1962 issue of the Labour Gazette, is revised to 17,100. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3—2 



• JANUARY 1964 



TABLE 2-UNION REPRESENTATION WITHIN INDUSTRY GROUPS, 1963 

Unions Comprising More Than 10 Per Cent 
of the Total Reported Membership 
Industry Group in Industry Group 

(in Alphabetical Order) 

Forestry Bush Workers, Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fishing and Trapping Native Brotherhood of B.C. (Ind.) 

United Fishermen (Ind.) 

Mines 

Metal Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Ind.) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Mineral fuels Mine Workers (Ind.) 

Non-metal Mining Employees' Federation (CNTU) 

Quarries Cement Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

National Council of Canadian Labour (Ind.) 
Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Incidental services Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Ind.) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manufacturing 

Food Bakery Workers (CLC) 

Packinghouse Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Retail, Wholesale Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Teamsters (Ind.) 

Beverages Brewery Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CLC-chartered locals 

Distillery Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Tobacco products Tobacco Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rubber Rubber Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC^ 

Leather Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Leather and Plastic Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Leather and Shoe Workers' Federation 

(CNTU) 
Packinghouse Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Textiles Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Textile Workers' Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
United Textile Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Knitting mills Clothing Workers Federation (CNTU) 

National Council of Canadian Labour (Ind.) 

Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Textile Workers' Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Clothing Amalgamated Clothing Workers (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 
Ladies Garment Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Wood Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Furniture and fixtures Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Upholsterers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers Federation (CNTU) 

Paper Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp and Paper Mill Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Printing and publishing Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lithographers (Ind.) 
Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Typographical Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Primary metals Metal Trades Federation (CNTU) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Metal fabricating Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinery . Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Transportation equipment Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Electrical products I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Electric Employees (Ind.) 
U.E. (Ind.) 

Non-metallic mineral products Cement Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Glass and Ceramic Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Petroleum and coal products Oil Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 



10 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE 2— UNION REPRESENTATION WITHIN INDUSTRY GROUPS, 1963 (Concl'd) 

Unions Comprising More than 10 Per Cent 
of the Total Reported Membership 
Industry Group in Industry Group 

(in Alphabetical Order) 

Chemical products Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNTU-chartered locals 

Oil Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Miscellaneous manufacturing Auto Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CLC-chartered locals 

Chemical Workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Construction Building Workers' Federation (CNTU) 

Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Labourers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Plumbers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Transportation and Utilities 

Air transport and incidental services Air Line Flight Attendants (CLC) 

Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 
Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
T.C.A. Sales Employees (Ind.) 

Water transport and incidental services I.L.A. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Railway transport 

Running trades Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Railway Conductors (Ind.) 

Non-operating employees Maintenance of Way (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Railway Carmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Railway, Transport and General Workers 
(CLC) 

Truck transport Teamsters (Ind.) 

Buses and streetcars Railway, Transport and General Workers 

(CLC) 
Street Railway Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Other transport Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Storage Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Teamsters (Ind.) 

Cornmunication Canadian Telephone Employees (Ind.) 

Letter Carriers (CLC) 
Postal Employees (CLC) 
Traffic Employees (Ind.) 

Power, gas and water I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Service Employees (CLC) 

Trade Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Retail, Wholesale Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Finance Commerce Employees' Federation (CNTU) 

Service Industries 

Education Public Employees (CLC) 

Public Service Employees Federation (CNTU) 

Health and welfare Building Service Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Employees (CLC) 

Service Employees' Federation (CNTU) 

Recreational services Musicians (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Services to business Commercial Telegrahers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Office Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Personal services .'. Hotel Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Miscellaneous services Building Service Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Office Employees (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Teamsters (Ind.) 
Public Administration 

Federal administration CLC-chartered locals 

Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Provincial administration B.C. Government Employees (CLC) 

Saskatchewan Government Employees (Ind.) 

Local administratioa Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Public Employees (CLC) 
Public Service Employees (CLC) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3—21 



• JANUARY 1964 



11 



TABLE 3— UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY PROVINCE, 1963 



Province 


Number 

of 
Locals 


Locals Reporting 


Number 


Membership 




111 

34 

334 

284 

1,751 

2,675 

310 

356 

408 

784 

9 

17 


98 

30 

302 

249 

1,485 

2,403 

289 

321 

387 

779 

5 

16 

709 


20,300 




1,600 




41,100 




27,400 




360,200 




553,000 




62,400 




43,400 


Alberta 


63,000 




188,6001 




600 




33,200 




54,400 










7,073 


7,073 


1,449,200 







♦Mainly Seafarers, Railroad Telegraphers, Commercial Telegraphers and Actors' Equity. 

tThe corresponding figure for 1962, shown as 193,000 in the March 1962 issue of the Labour Gazette, is revised to 
185,000, 



TABLE 1-UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY LABOUR MARKET AREA, 1963 



Labour Market Area 



Areas Having Under 1,000 Members 



Corner Brook 

Grand Falls 

St. John's 

Two or more areas. 



Newfoundland 




24 

20 

50 

2 




3,100 
2,600 
9,400 
5,000 



Prince Edward Island 



Charlotte town. 



| 26 | 1,300 | Summerside 

Nova Scotia 



Amherst 

Halifax 

Kentville 

New Glasgow 

Sydney 

Truro 

Two or more areas. 



Bathurst. . . . 
Cambellton . 
Edmundston. 
Fredericton . . 

Moncton 

Saint John... 



Asbestos 

Beauharnois 

Buckingham 

Drummondville 

Farnham — Granby * 

Gaspe* 

Hull* (included with Ottawa, Ont.) 

Joliette 

La Tuque 

Lac St. Jean* 

Lachute — Ste. Therese* 

Montmagny 

Montreal* 

Quebec— Levis* 

Quebec North Shore* 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup 

Rouyn— Val d'Or* 

St. Hyacinthe 

St. Jean 

Ste. Agathe — St. Jerome* 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke* 

Sorel 

Thetford— Megantic— St Georges*. . 



13 


1,000 


88 


15,500 


25 


14,600 


43 


4,900 


76 


13,900 


19 


1,000 


3 


600 


*ew Brun 


swick 


21 


2,200 


22 


2,700 


18 


1,700 


23 


1,100 


51 


6,700 


78 


10,000 


Quebe 


c 


5 


1,400 


10 


1,300 


11 


1,300 


24 


4,300 


45 


5,700 


11 


1,400 


36 


3,700 


12 


1,500 


113 


15,200 


18 


2,900 


8 


1,700 


535 


193,300 


159 


32,100 


36 


6,300 


16 


1,800 


18 


1,500 


34 


3,100 


25 


4,800 


25 


3,500 


19 


3,500 


34 


5,900 


75 


11,500 


21 


3,100 


28 


3,900 



Bridgewater, Inverness, Liverpool, 
Springhill, Yarmouth 



Minto, Newcastle, St. Stephen, 
Sussex, Woodstock 



Maniwaki, Mont Laurier 



12 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE 4— UNION MEMBERSHIP, BY LABOUR MARKET AREA, 1963— Concluded 



Labour Market Area 



Locals Membership Areas Having Under 1,000 Members 



Qu ebec— Concluded 



Trois Rivieres 

Valleyfield 

Victoria ville 

Two or more areas. 



Barrie 

Belleville— Trenton* 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Cornwall 

Fort Frances 

Fort William— Port Arthur*. 

Gait 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

London 

Niagara Peninsula* 

North Bay 

Oshawa 

Ottawa— Hull* 

Owen Sound 

Pembroke 

Peterborough 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Simcoe 

Smiths Falls 

Stratford 

Sudbury* 

Timmins — Kirkland Lake*. . 

Toronto* 

Windsor 

Woodstock— Tillsonburg* 

Two or more areas 



Brandon 

FlinFlon 

The Pas 

Winnipeg 

Two or more areas. 



Moose Jaw 

North Battleford.. 

Prince Albert 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Weyburn 

Yorkton 

Two or more areas. 



Blairmore 

Calgary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Two or more areas. 



Central Vancouver Island* 

Cranbrook 

Kamloops 

Kitimat 

Okanagan Valley* 

Prince George 

Prince Rupert '. . . . 

Trail — Nelson* 

Vancouver — New Westminster* . 

Victoria 

Two or more areas 



59 


10,000 


18 


3,000 


28 


3,600 


15 


21,500 


Ontario 


19 


1,200 


54 


6,100 


19 


2,600 


50 


7,200 


20 


2,600 


21 


2.600 


18 


1,200 


30 


5,000 


16 


1,600 


116 


23,700 


50 


4,700 


52 


5,900 


156 


47,800 


12 


5,200 


28 


3,400 


38 


7,100 


62 


13,100 


97 


19,800 


173 


28,000 


44 


5,000 


48 


19,800 


130 


25,000 


16 


1,600 


27 


2,300 


50 


7,300 


39 


2,800 


35 


6,800 


45 


10,200 


16 


1,100 


19 


1,400 


33 


2,400 


71 


28,700 


61 


5,600 


509 


177,600 


83 


27,000 


23 


3,700 


20 


30,800 


Manitol 


>a 


32 


1,800 


12 


2,900 


12 


3,100 


216 


53,700 


1 


500 


Saskatche 


wan 


38 


4,200 


18 


1,700 


31 


3,200 


77 


13,300 


90 


11,100 


8 


1,200 


27 


1,700 


5 


5,100 


Albert 


* 


12 


1,400 


114 


23,100 


151 


30,400 


40 


2,700 


28 


2,600 


3 


2,400 


ritish Col 


umbia 


58 


13,200 


27 


4,000 


34 


2,800 


7 


1,700 


57 


8,700 


34 


3,400 


35 


3,800 


40 


5,800 


360 


120,800f 


89 


15,000 


7 


6,900 



Arnprior, Bracebridge, 
Carleton Place, 
Collingwood, Gananoque, 
Goderich, Hawkesbury, 
Leamington, Lindsay, 
Listowel, Midland, 
Napanee, Orillia, 
Parry Sound, Perth, 
Picton, Prescott, Renfrew, 
Sious Lookout, Sturgeon Falls, 
Walkerton, Wallaceburg. 



Dauphin, Portage la Prairie 



Estevan, Lloydminster, 
Swift Current. 



Drum heller, Edson, Red Deer 



Chilliwack, Dawson Creek, 
Princeton, Quesnel 



•Indicates labour market area comprising two or more NES local office areas. See Appendix. 
fThe corresponding figure for 1962, shown as 128,000 in the March 1962 issue of the Labour Gazette, is revised to 
120,000. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



13 



APPENDIX TO TABLE 4 

LABOUR MARKET AREAS COMPRISING TWO OR MORE LOCAL OFFICE AREAS 

Labour market areas appear in bold type, followed by names of the component NES local 
office areas in light type. 

Quebec 

Farnham-Granbv: Cowansville, Farnham, Granby. Gaspe: Causapscal, Chandler, Gasp6, Matane, 
New Richmond. Lac St. Jean: Chicoutimi, Dolbeau, Jonquiere, Port Alfred, Roberval, Ville 
d'Alma. Lachute-Ste Therese: Lachute, Ste Therese. Montreal: Montreal, Ste Anne de Bellevue. 
Quebec-Levis: Levis, Quebec. Quebec North Shore: Baie Comeau, Forestville, La Malbaie, Sept 
lies. Rouyn-Val d'Or: Rouyn, Val d'Or. Ste Agathe-St Jerome: Ste Agathe, St Jerome. Sherbrooke: 
Magog, Sherbrooke. Thetford-Megantic-St Georges: Megantic, Thetford Mines, Ville St Georges. 
Trois Rivieres: Louiseville, Trois Rivieres. 

Ontario 

Belleville-Trenton: Belleville, Trenton. Fort William-Port Arthur: Fort William, Port Arthur. 
Niagara Peninsula: Fort Erie, Niagara Falls, Port Colborne, St. Catharines, Welland. Ottawa-Hull: 
Hull, Que., Ottawa, Ont. Sudbury: Elliot Lake, Sudbury. Timmins-Kirkland Lake: Kirkland Lake, 
Timmins. Toronto: Long Branch, Newmarket, Oakville, Toronto, Weston. Woodstock-Tillsonburg: 
Tillsonburg, Woodstock. 

British Columbia 

Central Vancouver Island: Courtenay, Duncan, Nanaimo, Port Alberni. Okanagan Valley: 
Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon. Trail-Nelson: Nelson, Trail. Vancouver-New Westminster: Mission 
City, New Westminster, Vancouver. 



Annual Labour Briefs to Cabinet 



Canadian Labour Congress and National Legislative Committee 
of International Railway Brotherhoods make annual submission 
of legislative recommendations. CNTU presentation delayed 



The Canadian Labour Congress and the 
National Legislative Committee of the 
International Railway Brotherhoods made 
their annual presentation of memoranda to 
the federal Cabinet on December 11 and 12 
respectively, exactly a year from the dates 
they had made their previous presentations. 
The Confederation of National Trade 
Unions is expected to appear before the 
Cabinet in February. 

The CLC's brief was read by Claude 
Jodoin, President of the Congress. Prime 
Minister Pearson and 13 members of his 
Cabinet attended the presentation, and the 
Prime Minister and Hon. Allan MacEachen, 
Minister of Labour, replied on behalf of the 
Government. The Railway Committee 
Room of the Parliament Buildings was 
filled to capacity by an audience consisting 
of CLC officials, trade union representa- 
tives, members of the federal Civil Service, 
and others. 

The Congress again made clear its stand 
with regard to the Government trusteeship 
over the Canadian maritime transport 
unions, and gave its views on unemploy- 
ment and the economic situation in general, 
and on a number of other matters. 

The Railway Brotherhoods' memorandum 
was presented by J. A. Huneault, Chairman 
of the Committee, attended by five of the 
other six members. The Committee asked 
the Government to give serious considera- 
tion to measures for dealing with unem- 
ployment, and it repeated its request for 



amendment of the Railway Act to provide 
compensation for railway employees dis- 
placed by technological changes. A num- 
ber of other questions were also touched 
on. 

The Brotherhoods' delegation was re- 
ceived by Hon. Lionel Chevrier, Acting 
Prime Minister in the absence through ill- 
ness of Mr. Pearson. The Minister of 
Labour and Hon. George Mcllraith, Min- 
ister of Transport, joined Mr. Chevrier in 
replying for the Government. 

The CLC Brief 

The CLC in its brief expressed qualified 
and reluctant approval of the establishment 
of a government trusteeship over the Cana- 
dian maritime transport unions. The Con- 
gress said that the consequences of the 
Maritime Transportation Unions Trustees 
Act, under which the trusteeship was set up, 
were so far-reaching, and the time the Act 
had been in effect so short, that it was "still 
virtually impossible at this moment to gauge 
its result." 

The Act could be regarded as part of a 
general trend toward more active interven- 
tion by governments in trade union affairs, 
or it could be looked at from the point of 
view of freedom of association, the brief 
said. But the Congress's view was that it 
"must be examined in the light of the cir- 
cumstances which led to its enactment, and 
of the need to preserve the public interest 
in the broadest sense of that term .... 



.14 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



"The imposition by force of law of a 
trusteeship over certain maritime unions, 
and more particularly the Seafarers' Inter- 
national Union of Canada, reflected a situa- 
tion that could no longer be considered 
open to solution by other than government 
action." But the Congress made "very con- 
siderable" efforts to bring peace and order 
to the waterfront by voluntary means. 

It was impossible to arrive at an agree- 
ment over the terms of composition of a 
voluntary trusteeship without jeopardizing 
"our own independence as a Canadian 
labour movement .... The obvious mis- 
understanding and misinterpretation which 
were given in the United States to the 
situation . . . led eventually to the com- 
plete breakdown in negotiations for a volun- 
tary trusteeship, and we were forced to 
recognize the need for the type of legisla- 
tion contained in the Maritime Transporta- 
tion Unions Trustees Act." 

The Congress said it had confidence in 
the trustees that were appointed and in 
their integrity and sense of public service. 

The Act had created uneasiness among 
Congress members but the CLC's misgivings 
about the Act had been tempered to some 
extent by the Government's obvious reluc- 
tance to enact it, the brief said. "We choose 
to regard it, not as a precedent for further 
legislation of this sort, but instead as an 
action taken in the face of a situation which 
required extraordinary measures. Otherwise 
our opposition to this Act would have been 
plainly manifest, and we would not have 
identified ourselves with it." 

Here the Congress took advantage of the 
opportunity to clarify certain misunderstand- 
ings. 

Whatever differences may have arisen over 
the question of trusteeship and its administra- 
tion, they do not reflect a conflict between 
national and international trade unionism . . . 
What has been brought into clear focus is 
something else entirely, namely, the importance 
of establishing once and for all the fact that 
Canadian trade unions must be free to develop 
their own policies in the light of conditions 
in their own country. 

Referring to the Norris report, the CLC 
expressed regret that neither its recom- 
mendations nor the legislation recognized 
that employers had been irresponsibly in- 
volved in the affair. "Where there is a cor- 
rupt union leader, there will also be found 
an employer willing to be his accomplice," 
the brief declared, and argued that it was 
"less than just that the burden of trustee- 
ship should have been imposed on trade 
unions alone, and more particularly on 
four of the five unions involved which 
emerged from the Norris inquiry with a 
clean bill of health." 



Strikes 

The brief commended the Government for 
not yielding to pressure on it to intervene 
during the longshoremen's strike in Quebec, 
at a time when it seemed that the strike 
might delay wheat shipments to the Soviet 
Union. "There were many voices calling 
upon you to intervene, to bring the strike 
to a halt . . . regardless of what would hap- 
pen to the workers involved and to the right 
of their union to conduct a legitimate strike." 

The CLC pointed out that the strike 
occurred after protracted negotiations and 
conciliation, and after the required pro- 
ceedings under the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act. The dis- 
pute was eventually settled voluntarily. 

The CLC admitted that it had caused 
inconvenience and annoyance to some and 
misgivings to others, but said that these 
were some of the inevitable consequences 
of industrial disputes, and constituted one 
of the calculated risks that any free society 
must take. 

Referring to the strike of loggers in 
Northern Ontario last winter in which three 
strikers were shot and killed, the Congress 
reflected on the justice of court decisions 
that had imposed fines of $100 each on 
those charged with the shootings, and of 
$200 each on strikers who had been con- 
victed of unlawful assembly in connection 
with the same occurrence. 

Unemployment 

Although there had been a modest reduc- 
tion in the number of unemployed during 
the year, and some improvement in the 
economy — the large sales of Canadian 
wheat abroad was an encouraging devel- 
opment — unemployment will continue to 
be one of our principal problems, the Con- 
gress said. 

Because it had repeatedly put itself on 
record concerning unemployment and had 
offered solutions, the CLC recounted them 
only briefly in its submission: a program 
of planned deficit financing, a very substan- 
tial expansion in the public sector of the 
economy, and increases in social security 
benefits and reductions in tax rates for 
those with low incomes — since the bene- 
ficiaries of such measures have "the greatest 
propensity to consume and any additions 
to their incomes would be reflected imme- 
diately in new purchases." 

The brief expressed satisfaction with 
various measures the Government had 
taken to relieve unemployment and to 
spread work more evenly over the year: 
incentives to winter house-building, exten- 
sion of the municipal winter works incen- 
tive program, establishment of the Munic- 
ipal Development Loan Fund, and provision 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 964 



15 



of more funds for training. It also approved 
of the recent increase in old age security 
benefits. 

The Government's proposed Manpower 
Consultative Service, the CLC said, might 
make a significant contribution to the prob- 
lems of technological change and unem- 
ployment. 

The Congress considered, however, that 
the measures already taken and those pro- 
posed were not enough to produce the 
degree of economic activity required to 
"satisfy the need for jobs and for progres- 
sively improving the standard of living." 
It disagreed with the Government's budget- 
ary policies, and it argued that this was not 
the time "for trying to balance budgets and 
increasing tax revenues through such devices 
as extension of the sales tax on building 
materials and machinery." 

On the contrary, the Government should 
"have faced up to continued budgetary 
deficits and the use of fiscal and monetary 
policies to stimulate the economy to a con- 
sistently high performance," involving con- 
siderably more than had so far been under- 
taken in this direction. "In short, we favour 
economic planning," the brief said. 

It welcomed the establishment of the 
Economic Council of Canada as a desirable 
step in the direction of such planning, and 
referred with satisfaction to the Council's 
terms of reference that required it to dis- 
cuss with major economic groups and organ- 
izations plans for production and invest- 
ment that would best promote "a high and 
consistent rate of economic growth." 

Canada Pension Plan 

Some concern was shown in the brief at 
the delay in setting up the proposed Canada 
Pension Plan; but the CLC said it was 
glad to note the Government's evident deter- 
mination to go ahead with the plan. 

It referred to "an extensive campaign" 
being waged by "the insurance industry" 
to prevent the pension plan from becoming 
a reality. But it said that this should not 
deflect the Government from giving effect 
to "socially desirable policies." 

Unemployment Insurance Act 

The Congress expressed approval of the 
recommendations of the Gill Committee 
of Inquiry into the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act that related to: universal coverage 
of all employees, general pooling of risk, 
establishment of a new insurance class, 
increase in the ratio of benefit to previous 
earnings, and the maintenance of the same 
rates for extended benefits as for regular 
benefits. 



It was also very much in favour of the 
proposal to transfer the National Employ- 
ment Service from the Unemployment In- 
surance Commission to the Department of 
Labour. 

But it strongly opposed the proposal to 
reduce the maximum period of benefit from 
51 to 26 weeks. It also opposed two recom- 
mendations that had to do with the 
accumulation of contributions and entitle- 
ment to benefit, which, it said would make 
it more difficult for claimants to establish 
eligibility than was now the case. It took 
exception to those recommendations that 
had to do with the definition of "earnings," 
which, if implemented, would deprive of 
benefit many thousands of workers who 
now qualify, it contended. 

International Issues 

The CLC reiterated its advocacy of the 
six-point program adopted at its fourth con- 
vention, which it had set out in the brief 
it presented last year (L.G., Jan. 1963, 
p. 15). But it expressed disappointment in 
the decision to equip Canadian forces with 
atomic weapons. 

"The Canadian Labour Congress does not 
contemplate a neutralist or non-aligned posi- 
tion for Canada," the brief said, but it did 
support those who were against a "nuclear 
role for Canada's armed forces." Instead of 
trying to keep up with the atomic arsenals 
of the two big powers, "we should con- 
centrate our military efforts on the things 
which we can produce ourselves within our 
economic and fiscal capabilities, and which 
will make our contribution a distinct and 
essential component of the over-all strategy 
of our alliances and partnerships." 

The establishment of the Special Parlia- 
mentary Committee on Defence was wel- 
comed as one of the things the CLC had 
asked for in its memorandum last year, as 
also were the Government's pledges to help 
in strengthening the political organs of the 
United Nations. 

"Canada should also help strengthen the 
authority of the United Nations by ratify- 
ing the Conventions adopted by the UN 
and its Agencies. We refer in particular 
to the international instruments adopted by 
the International Labour Organization." 

The Congress welcomed the announce- 
ment that the Government would double 
Canada's contribution to the United Nations 
Special Fund. It urged, however, that 
Canada's contribution to the assistance pro- 
grams of the U.N. should be increased to 
at least 1 per cent of her gross national 
product. 



16 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



Other Recommendations 

The Congress was encouraged by the 
Government's "tariff-incentive scheme" to 
help the Canadian automobile industry; it 
welcomed such schemes to assist secondary 
industries to improve their efficiency and 
expand their exports. 

At the same time, it urged proper safe- 
guards to prevent dislocation of labour. 
If such schemes did result in dislocation of 
labour or capital, adequate compensation 
should be given to the employees and 
employers affected. 

The brief favoured the passing of Bill 
C-15, to amend the Railway Act (Respon- 
sibility for Dislocation Costs), which, it 
said, would be "a great step forward in 
providing workers with the assurance that 
technological change would not merely 
result in their being thrown on the industrial 
scrap heap." 

Canadian railways should face the con- 
sequences of problems created by tech- 
nological changes they introduce, the CLC 
said. Over a period of years Canadian rail- 
ways had "relentlessly pursued a course of 
change calculated to improve their 
efficiency." 

We can readily appreciate the motives behind 
the railways' actions. Like any other industrial 
undertakings, they must constantly strive to 
operate as economically as possible. But we 
strongly object to the fact that the cost of 
improved efficiency is being borne by the 
workers in the industry. 

Displaced railway workers are being thrown 
out of employment, sometimes after long years 
of service, and compelled to find employment 
under vastly different circumstances than any 
that they had been trained for or experienced. 

It is not enough for them to be entitled to 
unemployment insurance benefits nor is it 
reasonable to assume that they should be forced 
to accept employment at lower wages or under 
inferior working conditions because the qualifi- 
cations which made them good railway em- 
ployees are not valuable in other industries. 
We consider that the consequences of redun- 
dancy should be faced up to by the railways 
which create it. 

The CLC said the Government should 
take a more active role in determining the 
location of industry. In a number of cases 
— Windsor, Ont., was an example — both 
employees and communities had suffered 
from the transfer of plant operations. 

The decision to establish plants in a partic- 
ular community or to transfer a plant from 
one locality to another should not lie with the 
corporations alone. The far-reaching effects of 
the decision require that the Government 
should participate. If measures to remedy un- 
employment and provide full employment are 
to be the policy of your Government, they must 
include a position on this important matter. 



The CLC in addition: 

— Urged action by the Government to 
establish a minimum wage of $1.25 an 
hour and a maximum work week of 40 
hours, to amend the Vacations With Pay 
Act, to introduce a new Fair Wages Act, 
and to amend the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act to provide for 
the check-off of union dues. 

— Opposed the proposal adopted by or- 
ganizations of municipalities in favour of 
what is commonly known as work for 
relief. 

— Welcomed the establishment by the 
Government of the Preparatory Committee 
on Collective Bargaining in the Public 
Service, but opposed compulsory arbitra- 
tion of disputes between the Government 
and its employees, favouring rather volun- 
tary arbitration. 

— Asked for income tax exemption with 
respect to the cost of tuition fees and other 
expenses connected with technical or educa- 
tional evening courses for employed persons 
trying to improve their productive capacity. 

— Reiterated its support of the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation as the principal 
broadcasting medium in Canada. 

— Urged amendment of the Canada Elec- 
tions Act to forbid an employer to prohibit 
or interfere with his employees' right to 
stand as candidates, or to engage in lawful 
activities in an election campaign. 

— Asked the Government to consider 
"the adoption of a new sugar policy to 
rectify the present intolerable situation" 
relating to the price of sugar. 

— Urged extension of the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act to the 
ship building and repair industry, and im- 
position of fair wage schedules on all 
government work done in private shipyards; 
establishment of a national advisory com- 
mittee on fair employment practices; reser- 
vation of coastal and intercoastal trade to 
vessels built and manned in Canada, and 
reservation of trade in inland waters to 
Canadian and American vessels; establish- 
ment of a Canadian deep sea fleet by means 
of subsidies; establishment of an air 
transport industry council; and amendment 
of the Income Tax Act to allow loggers to 
claim deduction of expenditures for trans- 
portation to and from their place of work, 
board and lodging at logging camps when 
the logger has to maintain a separate estab- 
lishment elsewhere, and on clothing and 
tools used in their work. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



17 



The Government's Reply 

The Prime Minister 

In replying to the Congress, Prime 
Minister Pearson said, with reference to 
the maritime union trusteeship, that the 
Government had taken the action it did 
with reluctance. It was not a course that 
it would care to take except in circum- 
stances such as those that had prevailed 
last summer, in which, even with the help 
of the Congress, no alternative to Govern- 
ment intervention had been found. 

Mr. Pearson recalled that at about the 
same time the Government had been urged 
to intervene with respect to the right to 
strike, and he said he was very glad that 
such intervention had not been necessary, 
and that the situation referred to had been 
corrected "without any violation of this 
right." 

The unemployment situation, the Prime 
Minister said, was improving. Figures that 
had just come out showed a further reduc- 
tion in unemployment, with the percentage 
of unemployment "lower than it has been 
for a good many years." But, he added, 
it was not low enough; and the Government 
would not be happy until it was down to 
where it should be. 

Mr. Pearson said the Government 
accepted deficit financing, provided it "does 
what it is meant to do: to keep the economy 
moving and get people to work." 

For social services, and a combination of 
assistance schemes and to help the provinces 
meet their obligations, and for other purposes 
which we think will add to our employment, 
we have added a further $250,000,000 to our 
budget — last year's budget. 

The Prime Minister expressed satisfaction 
that the Congress supported the Govern- 
ment's "desire to facilitate economic plan- 
ning" through the formation of the Cana- 
dian Economic Council, and, regarding the 
Canada Pension Plan, he said that the 
Government thought that it should stand 
by its proposal for a national contributory 
portable pension scheme, and intended to 
proceed with such a plan as soon as pos- 
sible. 

The Minister of Labour 

Within the framework of the maritime 
union trusteeship, the Government had 
tried to provide a situation that would 
recognize and abide by present collective 
agreements and would provide for their 
renegotiation in the normal way, the 
the Minister of Labour told the Congress 
delegation. He said that the trusteeship 
would not destroy or abrogate in any way 
the constitution and by-laws of the unions 
concerned, and that any such changes could 



be made only by the members of the 
unions themselves. 

He pointed out that Parliament had 
provided for the termination of the trustee- 
ship at the end of a three-year period, and 
that it could be extended only by the 
action of the Governor-in-Council, and was 
then subject to possible revocation at the 
request of any ten members of Parliament. 

The intention of the Government was to 
let the trusteeship carry on its activities 
independently, the Minister said. The 
trustees were in certain respects union 
officers, and the Government did not wish 
to interfere with their day-to-day activities. 

With reference to the way in which the 
Government had respected the longshore- 
men's right to strike, Mr. MacEachen said 
that what had happened in that matter had 
taught him the lesson that many of the 
"arguments of national peril" put forward 
in a time of crisis become obsolete almost 
as soon as the dispute is settled. 

Although the unemployment situation had 
shown improvement, the Minister agreed 
that the present rate of unemployment was 
too high, and the Government intended to 
do everything possible to reduce it, he said. 

Mr. MacEachen described the Winter 
House Building Incentive Program as "a 
great success." He said that the 26,000 
applications received, covering more than 
31,000 dwelling units, would provide sub- 
stantial employment and would help to 
stabilize employment over the total 12- 
month period. 

The volume of applications under the 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program, 
and the labour content of the program, this 
winter would greatly exceed those of any 
preceding winter, the Minister reported, 
saying that this justified the Government's 
decision to shorten the period of the pro- 
gram. 

Any changes in the Unemployment In- 
surance Act made as a result of the recom- 
mendations of the Gill Committee would 
have to be carefully considered, Mr. Mac- 
Eachen said, and "at the appropriate stage 
any principle affecting these changes ought 
to be sent to a Parliamentary committee so 
that further representations may be made 
by interested bodies." 

International Railway Brotherhoods' Brief 

By far the largest part of the brief of the 
National Legislative Committee of the 
International Railway Brotherhoods was 
devoted to a request for amendment of the 
Railway Act to provide "in clear and un- 
mistakable language" for compensation for 
employees affected by the abandonment of 
railway lines. 



18 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



This request, which the Committee has 
made in its submissions since 1958, took up 
11 of the 21 pages in the brief. Requests for 
further changes in the Act, relating to level 
crossings, occupied another page. 

Among the other requests and suggestions 
were many that had been made in earlier 
submissions, including: 

— Transfer of the National Employment 
Service from the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Commission to the Department of 
Labour. 

— Establishment of a Canadian Trans- 
portation Authority "to carry out a national 
policy affecting transportation." 

— Consideration of four major recom- 
mendations on the effects of automation and 
technological change. 

— Amendment of the Criminal Code to 
permit legal lotteries, the funds raised to be 
allocated to social services. 

Unemployment Insurance Act 

Dealing with the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act, the Committee recommended that 
the National Employment Service be trans- 
ferred from the Unemployment Insurance 
Commission to the Department of Labour, 
as recommended by the Gill Committee of 
Inquiry into the Unemployment Insurance 
Act. 

The brief also expressed the desirability 
of having all employers register job vacan- 
cies and requirements with the NES. Fur- 
ther, it requested that the payment of un- 
employment insurance benefits by mail be 
extended to all regions of Canada, and that 
"consideration be given to expanding and 
improving the National Employment Serv- 
ice in an effort to achieve full employment 
in Canada." 

The Railway Act 

In its request for amendment of the Rail- 
way Act to make effective the principle of 
compensating railway employees affected by 
the abandonment of branch lines and simi- 
lar changes, the Committee said: 

We most urgently request that amendments 
be made to the Railway Act by revising Section 
182 to provide in clear and unmistakable 
language for compensation for financial loss 
caused to employees by any change whatso- 
ever made in the operation of the railways which 
requires employees who are retained in the 
service to change their places of residence, 
whether such changes are authorized under 
Section 168 or any other portion of the Rail- 
way Act. 

We also request the same consideration for 
employees who are deprived of employment 
as is contemplated in the Canadian National- 
Canadian Pacific Act. 

Earlier in the submission the Committee 
recalled how the Canadian National-Cana- 
dian Pacific Act, which had for its purpose 



the provision for co-operation between the 
Canadian National Railways and the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway system, was amended 
in 1939 to provide for severance pay for 
"every employee who is deprived of his 
employment as a result of any . . . measure, 
plan or arrangement ... by Canadian Na- 
tional Railways or Canadian Pacific Rail- 
ways ..." 

In addition, arrangements were provided for 
those who should be laid off and subject to 
call to return to work and for those who 
chose to resign and seek work elsewhere. 
Provision was also made to compensate dis- 
placed employees for financial loss occasioned 
by having to change their place of residence. 

Many classes of employees are being 
affected by changes and reorganization by 
the railways, the brief continued. Branch 
lines are abandoned, small terminals elimi- 
nated, maintenance of way sections greatly 
extended, and stations closed. 

"Over a recent two-year period, more than 
150 station agents were removed from rail- 
ways in Canada," the Committee said. "It 
is safe to say that the removal of such agents 
has resulted in a saving to the railways of 
three quarters of a million dollars a year." 

And this is a continuing saving each year, 
whereas compensation would cost only a 
fraction of the saving made in one year 
and would be a one-time cost, the Com- 
mittee pointed out. 

The same principle applies, it said, in the 
case of all employees who are moved but 
retained in railway service. 

According to DBS, the reduction in the num- 
ber of employees on Canadian railways in one 
recent year was almost 18,000, which con- 
stitutes almost ten per cent of the work force. 
Where such reductions can be made without 
affecting the efficient operation of the railways 
there can be no question that the railways have 
the right to make such reductions; but we do 
not believe they had the right to cause finan- 
cial loss to their employees without some com- 
pensation . . . 

We have every reason to believe that reduc- 
tion in staffs will continue for some time at 
least; and we urge the necessity for early action 
on our requests. 

Automation and Technological Change 

The brief commended the federal 
Government for initiating the establish- 
ment of an Economic Council of Canada. 
To assist the effective operation of the 
Council, the brief advanced four major 
recommendations : 

1. Government policy should be primarily 
concerned with the human consequences of 
technological change and not only with the 
possibility of economic growth through in- 
creased production. 

2. Close liaison should be developed between 
the Economic Council of Canada, the 
Advisory Committee on Technological Change, 
branches of the Department of Labour, and 
all other government agencies. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



19 



3. Co-ordination of research projects con- 
ducted by the Economic Council and the De- 
partment of Labour so as to avoid overlapping 
and duplication. 

4. Expansion of and publicity on the services 
offered by the Department of Labour through 
the Manpower Consultative Service program. 

National Transportation Policy 

The brief urged the Government to set 
up a Canadian Transportation Authority in 
order to formulate and carry out a national 
transportation policy. This body would 
combine and expand the present functions, 
duties and responsibilities of the Board of 
Transport Commissioners, the Air Transport 
Board and the Canadian Maritime Commis- 
sion, the brief said. The Authority would 
see to it that equitable competition was 
maintained between the various forms of 
transportation, and would co-ordinate trans- 
portation services in the interests of the 
Canadian public. 

With respect to the St. Lawrence Seaway, 
the brief opposed a reduction of tolls or a 
rearrangement of financial obligations that 
"would circumvent the intention of Parlia- 
ment in establishing the St. Lawrence Sea- 
way Authority." 

The Act provides that full recovery of 
construction and operating costs should be 
effected from the toll charges collected 
in the 50 years following 1959. A policy of 
inadequate seaway tolls would prevent this 
and would also provide seaway transporta- 
tion with an unfair competitive advantage 
to the detriment of rail transportation, the 
brief asserted. 

Air Pollution 

Pointing out that millions of tons of pol- 
lutants were being released into the air every 
day, and that research had established a link 
between air pollution and cancer of the 
throat, lungs and stomach, the brief called 
for expanded government research on this 
problem. 

The Committee expressed particular con- 
cern over the fact that during last July, 24 
railway workers were stricken with carbon 
monoxide poisoning during a tour of duty 
"in the spiral tunnels of British Columbia," 
and required hospital treatment. The effects 
suffered by the remaining 150 employees 
was cause for additional concern. 

Legal Lotteries 

The brief called for amendment of the 
Criminal Code to permit legal lotteries, 
and suggested that the funds raised be 
allocated to social services. It pointed out 
that large amounts of money were annually 
leaving Canada in connection with lotteries 
conducted in other countries, and that race 
track betting has legal status in Canada. 



Canada Pension Plan; Other Subjects 

Supporting the Government on its pro- 
posed national contributory pension plan, 
the brief nevertheless expressed concern over 
the effect that the plan might have on the 
private pension plans in which many rail- 
way employees are now participating. 

The brief supported the immigration of 
persons who could contribute to the 
development of the country, but stressed 
that Canada's skilled workers should be 
encouraged to remain in Canada. It com- 
mended the joint efforts of the federal and 
provincial Governments in the training of 
skilled workers, so that Canada need not 
depend on immigration to supply this type 
of labour. 

The brief recommended the repeal of 
Subsection 6 of Section 265 of the Railway 
Act, which deals with the Railway Grade 
Crossing Fund. As the Act stands now, the 
Committee believes, it tends to reduce the 
number of grade separations that are built 
and appears to involve duplication of ex- 
pense. 

Concerned over the number of accidents 
at level crossings, the Committee again 
asked for action in this problem. But in- 
stead of repeating its request for the 
elimination of level crossings — which had 
been shown to be prohibitively expensive — 
the Committee in its brief recommended the 
installation of manual or signal protection 
at hazardous crossings. In addition, it sug- 
gested that the Minister of Transport request 
the National Research Council to conduct 
research on warning systems for use on all 
public and commercial vehicles. 

On taxation, the brief urged that the 
basic exemptions under the Income Tax Act 
be increased, and that the basic exemptions 
under the Estate Tax be raised from the 
present $60,000 to $100,000. The present 
method of estate taxes on pensions and 
annuities requires widows to pay these taxes 
on amounts not yet received. 

As in previous briefs since 1958, the Com- 
mittee asked for legislation that would 
insure enforcement of improved health and 
sanitation standards for railway employees. 
A standard of sanitation and facilities equal 
to those provided for the travelling public 
should be given to railway employees, the 
Committee said. 

The Committee again repeated its recom- 
mendation that labour be adequately repre- 
sented on government-appointed boards and 
commissions. 



20 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



The Government's Reply 

Hon. Lionel Chevrier, Minister of Justice 
and Acting Prime Minister, was first to reply 
to the brief presented by the Railway 
Brotherhoods. 

In reply to the request for establishment 
of a Canadian Transportation Authority to 
formulate and carry out a national trans- 
portation policy, the Acting Prime Minister 
said he remembered how the Turgeon Com- 
mission had strongly made that recom- 
mendation, and he had hoped one day to 
bring in an amendment to the various acts 
that would implement that recommendation 
(Mr. Chevrier is a former Minister of 
Transport). 

But "there were so many amendments to 
the various statutes that had to be brought 
forward in order to implement all the recom- 
mendations of the Turgeon Commission that 
it was impossible to reach this one." The 
recommendation, which in his opinion had 
"a tremendous merit," had been discussed 
with keen interest at the time, but it had 
provincial implications as well, he pointed 
out. 

As to the St. Lawrence Seaway tolls, he 
said there was an agreement between two 
countries and he did not think that any 
Government would dare change the policy 
of using tolls to amortize and recapture 
the cost of the facilities. 

Replying to the request for legal lotteries, 
he stated the subject had come up for dis- 
cussion at the recent Dominion-Provincial 
Conference. He said he personally 
favoured the establishment of lotteries, 
under provincial jurisdiction, but that there 
were other views also. He added that he 
would be reporting soon to the Cabinet 
on the views of the provinces. 

The Minister of Labour 

"I am very pleased that you recognize, as 
we do, the necessity of training and educa- 
tion and retraining in creating an adaptable 
labour force," the Minister of Labour told 
the delegation. He mentioned the additional 
assistance in training allowances and con- 
tributions for technical-training facilities 
that the federal Government was extending 
to the provinces. 

Answering other points of the brief, he 
stated that steps had been taken to 
strengthen the personnel resources of the 
National Employment Service. As for 
severing the NES from the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission, as recommended by 
the Gill Committee, this matter "is under 
active consideration and we may be able 
to announce steps in that direction in the 
near future," he declared. 

On the question of paying special atten- 
tion to the human factors of technological 



change, he mentioned that the Department 
of Labour had established a new manpower 
consultative service to assist labour and 
management in particular plants to make 
studies and adjustments. He also said the 
Government hoped to encourage any suit- 
able retraining programs and had in mind 
re-employment incentives to provide em- 
ployment assistance for workers displaced 
by technological change. 

The Minister of Transport 

Hon. George J. Mcllraith, Minister of 
Transport, dealing with the Committee's 
requests and recommendations concerning 
the Railway Act, said that one thing was 
quite clear: the legislation was out of date. 
He thought this was certainly true of Sec- 
tion 182 and the related sections. 

Presenting another side to this question, 
the Minister of Transport said: "Now, I am 
not sure, in my mind, as to whether that 
kind of thing should be part of the negotia- 
tions and agreements or whether it should 
be part of legislation. There is a question 
there." He stressed that he would want to 
reserve the right to give further considera- 
tion to this question, as it was quite a 
serious matter. 

As to the Railway Grade Crossing Fund, 
he said "legislation had been put through 
now and we can try extending the Grade 
Crossing Section of the Railway Act for 
another three years." A "technical change" 
was also to be made in the method of 
providing funds, facilitating the work of the 
Board of Transport Commissioners when it 
deals with the municipalities. 

Although statistics of motor car accidents 
and fatalities presented a constant warning, 
during the last six years there had been a 
consistent decrease in the number of motor 
vehicle accidents at railway crossings when 
related to the total number of motor vehicle 
accidents, "so there is some real good being 
accomplished by that fund," the Minister 
observed. 

Referring to the request for a national 
transportation policy, the Minister said he 
thought "it was imperative that we try to 
get forward with as much as we could of 
the MacPherson Royal Commission legisla- 
tion because the railway legislation was so 
far out of date." The Government had pro- 
gressed to the point where the proposed 
legislation was placed on the order paper, 
but it was obvious that it would not go 
through at the then current session and 
would have to stand over until early spring. 

Because this matter would have to take 
priority over that of obtaining a Canadian 
Transportation Authority, there had been 
no decision and no real consideration for 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



21 



setting up such an authority "and doing 
away or embodying the other transporta- 
tion in it." 

Some consideration had been given this 
matter in his own department, he said. He 



pointed out that some real problems would 
be involved — for example, incorporating 
into such a central body the Canadian Mari- 
time Commission, which is primarily con- 
cerned with shipbuilding subsidies. 



The Canadian Chamber of Commerce 

Submits Recommendations to Cabinet 

Urges immediate implementation of recommendations of Gill 
Committee, proposes that all federal deputy ministers should 
be fluently bilingual, favours Ontario's kind of pension law 



In its annual policy presentation to the 
federal Cabinet on December 6, the Cana- 
dian Chamber of Commerce urged the 
immediate implementation of the recom- 
mendations of the Gill committee of in- 
quiry into the Unemployment Insurance 
Act. 

It made a recommendation that it had 
not made in previous representations to the 
Cabinet in proposing that all deputy min- 
isters of federal departments should be 
"fluently bilingual." 

The delegation, headed by President Ho- 
ward T. Mitchell, said the Chamber recog- 
nized that some Canadians were unable to 
provide adequate medical care for them- 
selves and their families. It approved the 
measures proposed by the voluntary service 
and indemnity plans, and by some provin- 
cial governments, to provide medical 
coverage for these people; but it expressed 
the opinion that the contributions of 
governments at all levels should be made 
only on behalf of those who were unable 
to provide for themselves. 

The Chamber's statement of policy, which 
was formulated at its 34th annual meeting 
in October, was presented under 46 head- 
ings and covered the broad subjects of: free- 
dom of enterprise, human resources, 
material resources, external relations, fi- 
nance, defence, transportation, and mis- 
cellaneous. In general, the recommenda- 
tions followed closely those of previous 
years. 

The Chamber, in referring to unemploy- 
ment insurance, said that the Canadian 
system of support for the unemployed 
should be based primarily on insurance 
principles, and should be so administered 
that abuses were eliminated and public sup- 
port for the system engendered. It 
repeated its previous assertion that "the 
original concept of unemployment insur- 
ance should not be expanded to embrace 
unemployment assistance by using contribu- 
tions from non-seasonal employment to sub- 
sidize seasonal unemployment." 



22 



Regarding old age security, the Chamber 
favoured the kind of pensions legislation 
enacted in Ontario. "This legislation, which 
extends existing provisions for pensions, 
utilizes the existing savings media, thus 
aiding the economy by creating new capital 
which becomes available for industrial 
expansion and the creation of new em- 
ployment opportunities. Further, this legis- 
lation maintains equity between all con- 
tributors and avoids subsidy between the 
various groups of the population," the 
Chamber said. 

It expressed concern about the sugges- 
tions made in Parliament that a contribu- 
tory wage-related government pension 
should be added to the present flat-rate 
government pension. "In such a plan, cross- 
subsidies between various groups are un- 
avoidable, and, as in the United States, 
result in the highest subsidies to the high- 
est income groups. Furthermore, a govern- 
ment contributory plan would withdraw 
large amounts of savings from the capital 
market to the great detriment of Canada's 
capital hungry economy." 

The Chamber contended that "the role 
of the federal Government in further ex- 
tensions into the field of old age security 
should be confined to assisting the provinces 
in the co-ordination of pensions legislation 
throughout the country .... Government- 
operated plans should be confined to the 
federal flat-rate pensions programs, with the 
possible addition of disability and survivors' 
benefits." 

It added that pension arrangements 
should be reasonably uniform across the 
country, "since so many Canadians are 
employed with companies operating in 
more than one province." 

Its often expressed concern about the 
continually rising burden of taxation in 
Canada was reiterated by the Chamber, 
and it suggested that some shift in em- 
phasis from taxes on income to taxes on 
expenditure should be considered in order 
to encourage industrial expansion and 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 






employment, and stimulate private initiative 
and effort. "Tax policy should be designed 
to encourage the flow of capital and re- 
sources into efficient industries and not 
into non-competitive uneconomic opera- 
tions, which are wasteful of our natural 
resources," the statement said. 

"Programs for further expenditures, for 
any purpose, must now be weighed against 
the regressive effects of increased costs of 
government upon the ability of the country 
to achieve a more rapid rate of growth 
which would itself go far toward achieving 
the socially desirable goal of such programs," 
the Chamber said. It again recommended 
a balanced budget as "a pressing objective." 

Employer-Employee Relations 

Under the heading of employer-employee 
relations, the Government was told that the 
Canadian Chamber was suggesting to its 
member Boards of Trade and Chambers of 
Commerce that they take the leadership in 
their communities in finding opportunities 
to promote closer collaboration and under- 
standing between labour and business in 
seeking solutions to Canada's economic 
problems. 

Ever-improving productive efficiency 
achieved in co-operation with labour will 
aid materially in the expansion of trade at 
home and abroad, the Chamber stated. 
Technological advances are essential to the 
country's general welfare and its economic 
strength. 

But these should take into account and 
make provision for the human values in- 
volved through constant attention to educa- 
tion and retraining, the statement declared. 



Handicapped and Older Workers 

Employers should recognize the impor- 
tant contribution that special categories or 
workers, such as old-age or handicapped 
groups, could make to the nation's produc- 
tive efforts, the submission said. It repeated 
previous recommendations to employers to 
give consideration to the suitable employ- 
ment of older workers and physically handi- 
capped persons and to the federal 
Government to encourage and support the 
provinces in developing co-ordinated 
rehabilitation programs, in which it should 
be given the fullest support by employers, 
workers, government and voluntary agents. 

Besides recommending that all deputy 
ministers of federal departments should be 
fluently bilingual, the Chamber said that 
"within each Government department, 
French and English should be recognized as 
official languages, not only in theory but in 
practice"; that all federal Government forms 
and documents should be bilingual when 
practicable, or else be available in both 
languages; and that employees of the federal 
Civil Service should "be encouraged to take 
special training to develop greater under- 
standing and facility in communications 
between the two major language groups of 
the country." 

The Chamber urged that the Parliament 
of Canada should formally adopt and 
authorize a distinctive national flag, and 
that the federal Government should adopt 
officially approved texts in both official 
languages of "O Canada" as the official 
national anthem of Canada. 

The Chamber asked that the Govern- 
ment, as a consistent policy, actively ensure 
a greater and more continuous flow of 
desirable immigrants to Canada. 



Decisions of Umpire 

(Continued from page 57) 

expected to know what is the exact range 
of the prevailing rates of pay for all the 
(types of) employment which may be suit- 
able in his particular case in the area in 
which he is prepared to accept work. It 
would, therefore, seem to me that, in the 
absence of definite evidence to show that a 
claimant, before making a statement of the 



kind which is alleged to have been made by 
the instant claimant, was reasonably in- 
formed by the interviewing officer of those 
rates and of the relevant provisions of the 
Act or Regulations, little, if any, value can 
be attached to such statement. 

I consequently decide to allow the claim- 
ant's appeal. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



23 



5th Biennial Convention of the AFL-CIO 

Gives Executive Council power to waive the internal disputes 
machinery in disputes between affiliates in Canada, when and 
if CLC adopts similar plan for handling jurisdictional fights 



The power to adjudicate jurisdictional 
disputes between Canadian branches of 
international unions will be handed over 
by the AFL-CIO to the CLC "when and if" 
the Canadian organization adopts a plan 
for dealing with such disputes. 

The 5th biennial convention of the AFL- 
CIO, held in New York from November 
14 to 20, approved a recommendation to 
empower the AFL-CIO Executive Council 
to waive its internal disputes machinery in 
disputes involving the Canadian member- 
ship of international unions affiliated with 
both the AFL-CIO and the CLC, if that 
congress adopts a similar jurisdictional 
disputes plan. 

The CLC had long been seeking 
autonomy in this matter. 

The convention did not amend the AFL- 
CIO constitution to give clear and im- 
mediate recognition to the right of the 
Congress to be the final arbiter in these 
disputes, as the CLC had hoped, even 
though the convention resolutions commit- 
tee had drafted a constitutional amend- 
ment. 

The resolutions committee was working 
on a resolution submitted by the Pulp, 
Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, who lost 
their position as bargaining agent at a 
British Columbia plant through an AFL- 
CIO ruling under its internal disputes plan. 
The resolution pointed out that the failure 
of the AFL-CIO to recognize the autonomy 
of the CLC had led to agitation for na- 
tional unions in Canada. 

The current CLC constitution provides 
that jurisdictional disputes between affili- 
ates will be submitted to the CLC President, 
who "shall endeavour by consultation with 
the appropriate officers of both affiliates to 
settle the matter by voluntary agreement 
between such affiliates." If no voluntary 
agreement is reached, the President reports 
his recommendation to the Executive Coun- 
cil for a decision. If an affiliate refuses to 
comply with that decision, the Council sub- 
mits the matter to a convention for action. 
It was under this provision in the constitu- 
tion that the Seafarers' International Union 
was expelled. 

The AFL-CIO's internal disputes plan 
(L.G., 1962, p. 38) provides for the 
arbitration of jurisdictional disputes by 
an impartial umpire. The umpire's decision 



may be appealed to federation's Executive 
Council but to date the umpire's decisions 
have stood. 

Another question particularly affecting 
Canada — the government trusteeship over 
Canadian maritime transport unions — did 
not come before the convention, although 
it was a burning issue at the three-day con- 
vention of the Maritime Trades Depart- 
ment of the AFL-CIO, which was held 
just before the parent body's convention 
(see following story). At the MTD con- 
vention, George Meany, AFL-CIO presi- 
dent, declared that he was "opposed to 
Government-controlled trade unions here 
in the United States, in Africa, in Germany 
under Hitler, in Rusia under Stalin, and 
in the Dominion of Canada." 

Unemployment and the civil rights issue 
were two of the main subjects of discus- 
sion at the convention. A move to allow 
the International Brotherhood of Teamsters 
to be re-admitted to the federation failed 
when it was strongly opposed by President 
Meany. 

The convention was described as the 
quietest since the merger of the AFL and 
the CIO in 1955. 

President's Address 

President George Meany proposed the 
3 5 -hour work week now and a shorter one 
later on as a means of alleviating unem- 
ployment, and he described automation as 
a "curse" to society, with "no element of 
blessing in it." 

In his presidential address, as further 
measures for wiping out unemployment, he 
called for an accelerated public works pro- 
gram, a substantial increase in the federal 
minimum wage and an extension of its 
scope, and lower income tax for those with 
small incomes. 

"Unless we wake up and do something 
about it," Mr. Meany said, "our whole 
system as we know it today will go down 
the drain as a result of the automation and 
unemployment it is creating." He ques- 
tioned the accuracy of the unemployment 
estimate of 5 per cent, placing it at nearer 
to 8 per cent. The reason for this, he said, 
was that the official figure took account of 
registered unemployed only, and did not 
include workers who did not register 
because they had no hope of finding em- 
ployment. 



24 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Joseph Morris 

Joseph Morris, Executive Vice-President 
of the Canadian Labour Congress, in his 
address as fraternal delegate to the conven- 
tion, without explicitly mentioning the 
trusteeship question, referred to "the dif- 
ferences of opinion which have arisen 
between our two labour movements during 
the past few weeks and months," and went 
on to say plainly that "the leadership the 
Canadian labour movement has given in 
this matter has been based firmly upon 
our intention of preserving the right to 
determine our own affairs." 

Canadian trade unionists have never 
been isolationists, Mr. Morris said. "More 
than 70 per cent of the membership of 
the Canadian Labour Congress is made up 
of members of international trade unions 
. . . We have taken the position of defend- 
ing and promoting international unionism 
because we believe it is a correct position 
in a continent with the complementary 
economies and institutions found in North 
America. We have, too, within the Cana- 
dian Labour Congress, as you have also 
within the AFL-CIO, purely national 
unions where that type of organization is 
felt to be appropriate. 

"You should be aware that during the 
last few years there has been the under- 
standable development of national feeling 
in Canada and a growing desire for greater 
national self-determination within the 
family of free nations. The dispute relating 
to the maritime union situation has focus- 
sed sharp attention on these sentiments of 
nationalism and self-determination. The 
position taken by the Canadian labour 
movement in this matter has received 
almost unanimous editorial and public 
support. 

"In each of our nations, from time to 
time, legislation is enacted which has some 
bearing on the institutions of the other . . . 
When such matters are before our legisla- 
tive bodies," Mr. Morris continued, "we 
make representations to the authorities 
involved . . . Our representations are based 
on the wishes and best interests of our 
members. 

"The Canadian labour movement 
reserves the right to determine demo- 
cratically what those wishes are and where 
the best interests of its members lie. We 
are happy to seek advice and counsel of 
fraternal organizations, but whatever deci- 
sion is finally taken, that decision must be 
ours." 

Toward the end of his address, the 
speaker repeated, "Above all, we believe 
that we must retain our right to make deci- 
sions concerning our own national affairs. 



To do less would be to surrender our 
sovereignty. We must retain the power to 
make decisions — right or wrong — which 
affect us and the welfare and progress of 
those whom we represent." 

President Kennedy 

President Kennedy called unemployment 
"the basic issue" and asked for organized 
labour's help in getting his economic pro- 
gram through Congress. The nation did 
not "dare to wait until it is too late" for 
the passing of a bill to reduce taxes; the 
bill offers a promise of new jobs for two 
or three million now out of work, he said. 

"We urgently need that tax cut as insur- 
ance against a recession next year," the 
President said. The "whole economic 
climate" is already affected, he contended, 
by lack of work for 4,000,000 people, and 
by a rate of unemployment in 1963, a 
"year of prosperity," as high as it was in 
1954, "a year of recession." 

Productivity goes up so fast, so many mil- 
lions come into the labour market, that un- 
less we have the most extraordinary economic 
progress in the history of our country, we can- 
not possibly make a dent in the 5.5 per cent 
jobless figure. 

Some considered civil rights the number 
one issue, President Kennedy said, and he 
agreed that the nation "needs the passage 
of our bill if we are to fulfil our constitu- 
tional obligations." But, he continued, "No 
one gains from a fair employment program 
if there is no employment to be had. No 
one gains by being admitted to a lunch 
counter if he has no money to spend. No 
one thinks much of the right to own a good 
home and to sleep in a good hotel or to go 
to the theatre, if he has no work and no 
money." 

Willard Wirtz 

A statutory reduction of the work week 
would "at best only spread unemploy- 
ment," and at the worst "would so increase 
costs as to curtail markets and reduce 
jobs," U.S. Secretary of Labor Willard 
Wirtz told the delegates. He added that 
it would also mean giving up the standard 
of living that the United States could 
attain as a nation by continuing with the 
present work week. 

One of the things affecting employment 
was that the private economy was not at 
present producing anything like enough 
jobs for people who want to work. Another 
was that an increasing number of people 
were not qualified to do the jobs that 
today's automated economy would provide 
even if it expanded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



25 



There was no reason to be afraid of 
machines, Mr. Wirtz contended. "We can 
use in this country all the things and serv- 
ices, all the machines, and all that the 
working men and women can produce. 
There is great reason, however, to be con- 
cerned about how hard it is to get people 
who are educated and trained to see what 
machines are doing to people who are not 
educated and trained." 

The nation faced a problem in unem- 
ployment resulting from automation, but 
he found encouragement in the growth of 
the economy during the past three years, in 
the increase in earnings, in the rejection of 
the idea that depressions were inevitable, 
and in the new evidence that a capitalistic 
people could meet the challenge of tech- 
nology. 

Other Speakers 

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller of New 
York also dealt with the unemployment 
question when he addressed the delegates. 
He said that the nation was going to need 
20,000,000 new jobs in the next five years. 

The first essential step in developing these 
jobs, he said, was to make properly designed 
tax reductions, together with strict controls 
on expenditure, to stimulate investment and 
increase individual incentives in the private 
sector of the economy. 

John 1. Snyder, Jr. 

Another speaker, John I. Snyder, Jr., 
President of U.S. Industries, Inc., said that 
he favoured a shorter work week as a 
means of solving the unemployment ques- 
tion, in the absence of other solutions. "I 
want to sell the automation machines my 
company makes, and if our economy turns 
sour, if the unemployment is not solved, I 
will have difficulty selling them," he said. 
He described President Kennedy's proposed 
tax reduction of $11,000,000,000 to create 
new jobs as only a partial solution. 

(A little more than a year ago, U.S. 
Industries and the International Association 
of Machinists, which represents the firm's 
employees, established an "American 
Foundation on Automation and Unem- 
ployment," financed by U.S. Industries 
through a royalty on sales and rentals of 
its equipment. Al Hayes, President of the 
IAM, is co-chairman of the Foundation 
with Mr. Snyder.) 

Mr. Snyder said that "most of our ex- 
perience" refuted the myths that retraining 
and relocation of those displaced was the 
answer to the disturbance caused by auto- 
mation. He contended that these ideas 
"unfortunately serve only as easy palliatives 
for those who either cannot or will not 
come forward and grapple with problems." 



His view was that the solution to unem- 
ployment brought about by automation lay 
in general planning directed toward creat- 
ing new industries and new markets for 
products. 

A. Philip Randolph 

For the first time, civil rights were given 
priority at an AFL-CIO convention over all 
other business, and the first place among 
the speakers was given to A. Philip 
Randolph, President of the Brotherhood of 
Sleeping Car Porters, the federation's only 
Negro vice-president. 

Mr. Randolph warned the delegates that 
the Negro's traditional loyalty to organized 
labour had been put to a severe strain, and 
that the Negro-labour alliance was being 
pulled apart by a combination of per- 
sistent discrimination in a number of unions 
with the failure of the trade union move- 
ment to throw its full weight into the civil 
rights revolution in every community. 

The convention's response was to pass 
a resolution on civil rights that was the 
strongest statement on the subject ever 
to come before an AFL-CIO convention 
and that marked a new phase in the federa- 
tion's policy on discrimination. The resolu- 
tion made a sweeping demand for equality 
for Negroes, both within the labour move- 
ment and on the community, state and 
national planes. 

Resolutions 

When the attempt was made to get the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters 
taken back into the federation, President 
Meany said that the union had not asked 
to come back, and that it would not be 
considered for re-affiliation until it made 
proper application. 

Mr. Meany pushed through a verbal vote 
against considering re-admission of the 
union, and over-rode the protests of some 
Teamsters' supporters who tried to get the 
floor. The resolution passed by the conven- 
tion said that the Teamsters union must 
apply for re-admission "under conditions 
that will fully protect the rights of all 
affiliates under the AFL-CIO constitution." 
The resolution also applied to the Inter- 
national Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union. 

The convention agreed to support the 
maritime unions in their efforts to bring 
flag-of-convenience ships under American 
union jurisdiction. It also passed a resolu- 
tion calling for assistance to the Govern- 
ment in expanding the nation's foreign trade. 

Toward the end of the convention, the 
delegates approved a 15-point program for 
a "comprehensive and massive job-creating 
effort." One of the 15 proposals called for 



26 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



early passage of President Kennedy's pro- 
posed $11,000,000,000 tax reduction. 
Failure to do this, the resolution said, 
"could mean the onset of another recession 
and rapidly rising unemployment during 
1964." 

Besides this, the 15-point program urged: 
formation of a national planning agency, 
bigger public works programs, a youth em- 
ployment project, reversal of the Federal 
Reserve Board's recent increase in the re- 
discount rate, quickened increases in wages 
and fringe benefits, legislation to broaden 
minimum wage coverage and an increase in 
the minimum to $2 an hour; a shorter work 
week — to be reduced to 35 from 40 hours — 
without reduction in pay, more liberal 
unemployment insurance, a national man- 
power policy, a federal commission on 
automation, increased aid to low-income 
families, federal advances in limiting job 
discrimination against Negroes and other 
minorities, curbing of corporate price 
policies in leading industries, and new 
measures to improve the U.S. balance of 
payments. 



Another resolution passed by the con- 
vention threatened to withdraw the AFL- 
CIO's traditional support for a liberal 
foreign trade policy unless government aid 
was forthcoming for American workers laid 
off because of imports. Labour's support 
of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 was 
based on adequate assistance or relief for 
those adversely affected by imports, the 
resolution said. "Its continued support for 
liberal trade depends on the fulfilment of 
this premise." The U.S. Tariff Commis- 
sion has refused requests by three unions 
for assistance for their members under the 
Act. The resolution said that the law could 
be effectively administered by the Com- 
mission without amendment; but "if it is 
not so administered ... an amendment 
will be necessary." 

Election of Officers 

In the election of officers, George Meany 
was re-elected President, and William F. 
Schnitzler Secretary-Treasurer. The 27 
vice-presidents on the Executive Council 
were all re-elected without opposition. 



Maritime Trades Department Convention 



The AFL-CIO's Maritime Trades Depart- 
ment, at its three-day convention held in 
New York just before the parent federa- 
tion's convention, drew up a program for 
fighting the Canadian government trustee- 
ship over the Seafarers' International Union 
of Canada and four other maritime trans- 
port unions. A special committee estab- 
lished to put the program into action began 
immediately to consider ways and means. 

The MTD, which represents 29 unions 
with a total membership of 400,000, 
adopted without discussion a policy state- 
ment, or special report, that said govern- 
ment control over trade unions must be 
opposed by all possible means. 

The first of seven recommended mea- 
sures outlined in the report was to carry 
the fight to the United Nations and the 
International Labour Organization. There 
was, however, no hint in the report as to 
how the MTD planned to place the issue 
before the U.N. 

The program included economic action, 
as deemed advisable, and consideration of 
a campaign of selective boycotting of Cana- 
dian goods and services. Other parts of the 
plan were an educational program to in- 
form trade unionists and the public of the 
"abrogation of the rights of Canadian trade 
unionists under the trusteeship," and pos- 
sible action by appropriate legislative 
agencies in the United States. 

In proposing representations to the U.N., 
the document maintained that Canada had 



violated articles of the U.N. Charter that 
call for respect for human rights and 
fundamental freedoms, including the free- 
dom of association and the right to join 
trade unions for the protection of the in- 
dividual's interests. 

The policy statement contended also 
that the trusteeship contravened the prin- 
ciples of freedom of expression and 
association embodied in the charter of the 
ILO, and it proposed suitable action by that 
organization. 

The statement described the Canadian 
Government's action as the gravest threat 
to free trade unionism ever made on the 
North American continent. The following 
are two extracts from the statement: 

"We have reviewed all the circum- 
stances leading to the creation of this 
trusteeship, and we most strongly feel 
that the drastic action which the Canadian 
Government has seen fit to take as a means 
of dealing with a labour-management 
dispute is clearly unwarranted. Certainly 
we, as trade unionists, cannot accept this 
method of dealing with a dispute between 
a union and an employer. 

"Aside from the merits of the dispute it- 
self, the application of government control 
over trade unions must be repugnant to 
every member of the free trade union move- 
ment, and must be opposed by all possible 
means." 

The special report was drafted and 
signed by officers representing six unions, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



27 



all but one of which have Canadian 
branches. These officers were: A. F. 
Young, Director of the Iron Shipbuilders 
International Marine Council, International 
Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship 
Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers; 
Robert E. P. Cooney, Vice-President, 
International Association of Bridge, 
Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers; 
S. Frank Raftery, Special Representative, 
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and 



Paperhangers of America; Thomas Gleason, 
President, International Longshoremen's 
Association; Russell Crowell, President, 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning International 
Union; and Stephen J. Leslie, International 
Representative, Marine Division, Inter- 
national Union of Operating Engineers. 

Affiliation of the first four is AFL-CIO/ 
CLC; of the last two, AFL-CIO. The 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning International 
Union has no members in Canada. 



Industrial Fatalities in Canada 

during Third Quarter of 1963 

Deaths from industrial accidents during 1963 's third quarter 
numbered 282, of which 58 occurred in construction industry 



A preliminary count of reports received 
by the Department of Labour shows that 
there were 282* industrial fatalities in 
Canada during the third quarter of 1963. 

During the previous quarter, 257 fatali- 
ties were recorded, including 25 in a sup- 
plementary list. In the third quarter of the 
previous year, 320 fatalities were recorded. 

During the third quarter of 1963, there 
were two accidents that each resulted in 
the deaths of three or more persons. On 
August 18, seven workmen were killed or 
died later of injuries received, when a boiler 
and furnace exploded at a pulp and paper 
mill in Woodfibre, B.C. On July 13, four 
RCMP officers were killed when a float- 
equipped aircraft crashed and burned on 
the outskirts of Carmacks, Y.T. 

The largest number of fatalities, 58, 
occurred in the construction industry. Of 
the 58 fatalities, 25 were in miscellaneous 
construction, 20 in highways and bridges, 
and 13 in buildings and structures. 

In the manufacturing industry, 10 of the 
42 fatalities were in paper products; 9 in 
iron and steel products; 4 each in food 
and beverages, and in wood products; 3 in 
non-ferrous metal products; 2 each in 
transportation equipment products, electrical 
apparatus products, products of petroleum 
and coal, chemical products and miscel- 
laneous manufacturing products; 1 each in 
rubber products and textile products. 

The 39 fatalities that were recorded dur- 
ng the third quarter in the transportation, 
itorage and communication industry were 
distributed as follows: 18 in local and 



* See Tables H-l and H-2 at back of book. The 
number of fatalities that occur during a quarter 
is usually greater than the figures quoted in the 
quarterly articles. Information on accidents that 
occur but are not reported in time for inclusion is 
recorded in supplementary lists, and statistics are 
amended accordingly. 



highway transportation, 13 in railway trans- 
portation, 5 in air transportation, 2 in water 
transportation, and 1 in the storage in- 
dustry. 

In the service industry, 27 of the 37 
fatalities were in public administration; 9 
in business, personal and domestic service; 
and 1 in recreation service. 

In the mining and quarrying industry, 
13 of the 30 fatalities were in metal min- 
ing, 12 in non-metal mining, and 5 in coal 
mining. 

In the remaining industries, the 76 
fatalities that occurred during the quarter 
were distributed as follows: 26 in agricul- 
ture, 20 in logging, 12 in public utilities, 
10 in trade, and 8 in fishing and trapping. 

Analysis by Cause 

An analysis of the 282 fatalities during 
the third quarter of 1963 shows that 67 (24 
per cent) were the result of collisions, 
derailments, wrecks, etc.; 32 of them in- 
volved automobiles and trucks, 16 involved 
aircraft, 8 involved tractors and load- 
mobiles, 4 involved railways, 3 each in- 
volved watercraft and miscellaneous agen- 
cies, and 1 involved an animal-drawn 
vehicle. 

Sixty fatalities were the result of being 
struck by different objects. Of these fatali- 
ties, 9 were caused by moving vehicles; 6 
were the result of being struck by tools, 
machinery, cranes, etc.; and 45 were in 
the category "other objects" such as fall- 
ing trees and limbs, and landslides or 
cave-ins. 

Fifty-seven fatalities were caused by 
falls and slips; all but five were the result 
of falls from different levels. 

Forty-eight fatalities were the result of 
being caught in, on or between; most of 



28 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



The industrial fatalities recorded in this quarterly article are fatal accidents that 
involved persons gainfully employed and that occurred during the course of, or arose out 
of, their employment, including deaths that resulted from industrial diseases. Statistics on 
industrial fatalities are compiled by the Economics and Research Branch from reports 
received from the provincial Workmen's Compensation Boards, the Board of Transport 
Commissioners and certain other official sources. Newspaper reports are used to supple- 
ment these. For industries not covered by workmen's compensation legislation, newspaper 
reports are the Department's only source of information. It is possible, therefore, that 
coverage in such industries as agriculture, fishing and trapping, and certain of the service 
groups is not as complete as in industries covered by compensation legislation. Similarly, 
a small number of traffic accidents that are in fact industrial may be omitted from the 
Department's records because of lack of information in press reports. 



them involved tractors, loadmobiles or 
machinery. 

The remaining 50 fatalities were distrib- 
uted as follows: 24 were caused by electric 
current; 13 were the result of conflagrations, 
temperature extremes and explosions; 8 
were caused by inhalations, absorptions, 
asphyxiations and industrial diseases; 2 
were the result of over-exertion; and 3 were 



Out of every 100 students who enrolled 
in engineering courses in Canadian uni- 
versities during the period 1950-59, an 
average of 44 a year dropped out of uni- 
versity without receiving a degree. The 
drop-out rate includes both failures and 
withdrawals. 

This is one of the findings of a study 
made by the Economics and Research 
Branch of the Department of Labour and 
published as "Professional Manpower Bul- 
letin No. 3, Drop-out Rates in University 
Engineering Courses. 

A comparison of drop-out rates in 
engineering with those in seven other 
faculties shows that arts and science was 
the only other faculty in which the drop- 
out rates in the period were close to those in 
engineering. In commerce, the rate was 
higher than in engineering at the beginning 
of the period but dropped considerably 
below during the latter part. 

"The average drop-out rate in engineering 
in 1956-58 appears to have been higher 
than that of the university as a whole," the 
bulletin says. "Further, the engineering drop- 
out rate in these years was increasing while 
rates in several other faculties were 
relatively stable. 

. "In engineering, most of the drop-out took 
place in the first year of the course. On the 
average, 24 per cent dropped out after first 
year, 10 per cent after second year, 6 per 
cent after third year, and 4 per cent in their 
graduating year." 

The bulletin raises the question whether 
those who dropped out had enough ability 
to succeed in university in the first place. 
"A full answer to this question must wait 
upon the results of more intensive educa- 
tional studies," it says, but the available 
evidence suggests that the relationship 



under the heading "miscellaneous acci- 
dents" 

By province of occurrence, the largest 
number of fatalities, 114, was in Ontario. 
In British Columbia there were 66, in 
Quebec 28, and in Alberta 23. 

During the quarter, there were 101 
fatalities in July, 95 in August, and 86 in 
September. 



between drop-outs and low scholastic 
ability is not as close as might be sup- 
posed. But the results of the Atkinson 
Study of Utilization of Student Resources 
issued by the Ontario College of Education 
in 1959 showed that "a significant propor- 
tion of first year failures had previously 
demonstrated scholastic ability." 

What then accounts for this loss of 
"potential," and what factors other than 
lack of scholastic ability contribute to 
drop-outs. In trying to answer this ques- 
tion, the bulletin quotes from the third 
study report of the Canadian Conference 
on Education, which suggests that "our 
failure to achieve greater development of 
the total student potential by formal educa- 
tion and training is due to many factors. 
Some of these operate within the per- 
sonality of the individual pupil, but are 
generally the result of his reaction to ex- 
ternal factors over which he has little 
control." 

Four factors that contribute to failures and 
withdrawals in the school system as a whole 
were enumerated in the cited report: the 
lack of effective guidance by parents and by 
society; the failure of parents and teachers 
to inspire motivation; the lack of oppor- 
tunity provided by the curriculum; and the 
lack of means." 

In seeking an explanation for the higher 
drop-out rate in engineering compared with 
other faculties, the bulletin deals briefly 
with several possible reasons. It notes that 
an increase in the student-staff ratio might 
raise the drop-out rate by inflating the 
proportion of students receiving less 
scholastic attention. And it points out that 
there were more "students per staff" in 
engineering than in the university as a 
whole. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



29 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 



Employment and Unemployment, December 



The estimate of 6,428,000 persons em- 
ployed in December was 68,000 smaller 
than that for November; but the decrease 
was less than seasonal. 

Yet the increase in unemployment dur- 
ing the month, by 43,000 to 346,000, was 
unusually small for the time of year. The 
average increase during this period in the 
past five years was 82,000. 

During the month, the labour force de- 
creased, from an estimated 6,799,000 in 
November to 6,774,000 in December, so 
that the seasonally adjusted unemployment 
rate fell from 5.1 per cent in November 
to 4.9 per cent in December. 

Employment in December was higher by 
268,000, or 4.4 per cent, from December 
1962; and unemployment was lower by 
68,000. The labour force was up by 
200,000, or 3.0 per cent, from a year 
earlier. 

Employment 

The decrease of 36,000 in non-farm em- 
ployment was the smallest decline between 
November and December in the past seven 
years. Farm employment declined season- 
ally by some 32,000 from November. 

Manufacturing employment, which usually 
falls at this time of year, was well main- 
tained during the month. Layoffs in con- 
struction were relatively light owing to a 
recent strengthening in residential construc- 
tion. 

Total employment in December was 4.4 
per cent higher than a year earlier, com- 
pared with an average December-to-Decem- 
ber increase over the past decade of 2.0 
per cent. 

The largest increases were in service and 
manufacturing, which together accounted 
for about three quarters of the over-all 



advance. Smaller gains took place in trade, 
forestry and construction. In the remaining 
industries, employment levels were much 
the same as the year before. The number 
of employed women increased by 141,000, 
or 8.1 per cent, over the year. Almost two 
thirds of them were married women. 

The number of employed men was higher 
by 127,000, or 2.9 per cent, than a year 
earlier; some 86,000 of the increase was 
among married men. 

Employment was up considerably from 
the previous year in all regions except the 
Atlantic region, where it was virtually un- 
changed. The increases ranged from 4.1 
per cent in the Prairie region to 5.7 in the 
Quebec region. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment rose from 303,000 to 
346,000 between November and December, 
an unusually small increase for the time of 
year. The increase was entirely among men. 

Compared with a year earlier, unem- 
ployment was down 68,000. More than four 
fifths of the decrease was among men 25 
to 64 years of age. 

Of the 346,000 unemployed in December, 
some 273,000 had been unemployed for 
three months or less. An estimated 35,000 
had been seeking work for from four to 
six months, and 38,000 for seven months or 
more. Virtually all of the year-to-year drop 
in unemployment was among persons unem- 
ployed for more than one month. 

Unemployment in December represented 
5.1 per cent of the labour force, compared 
with 6.3 per cent a year earlier and 6.4 per 
cent two years ago. In November the rate 
was 4.5 per cent. 

Unemployment rates were lower than a 
year ago in all five regions. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Shortage 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 




Dec. 
1963 


Dec. 
1962 


Dec. 
1963 


Dec. 
1962 


Dec. 

1963 


Dec. 

1962 


Dec. 
1963 


Dec. 
1962 




3 
11 

3 
26 


6 
12 

5 
28 


9 
15 
10 
26 


6 
13 

9 
26 














1 








1 
5 








3 












Total 


43 


51 


60 


54 


6 


4 













Note: Kitimat Labour Market Area is no longer included in this table. 



30 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-DECEMBER 





SUBSTANTIAL LABOUR 


MODERATE LABOUR 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




SURPLUS 




SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




QUEBEC-LEVIS 


«— 


Calgary 








St. John's 




Edmonton 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Vancouver-New 




Halifax 






(labour force 75.000 or more) 


Westminster-Mission City 


HAMILTON «< 

Montreal 












OTTAWA-HULL -<— 












TORONTO -<— 












Windsor 












Winnipeg 








Corner Brook 




BRANTFORD -< — 








FARNHAM-GRANBY 


-<-— 


Cornwall 








JOLIETTE 




Fort William-Port 








Lac St. Jean 




Arthur 








MONCTON 


•^ — 


GUELPH -<-— 








NEW GLASGOW 




Kingston 

KITCHENER -< — 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 


NIAGARA PENINSULA -< — 






(labour force 25,000-75.000; 
60 per cent or more in non-agri- 
cultural activity) 


SHAWINIGAN 

SHERBROOKE 

SYDNEY 

TROIS RIVIERES 

• 


<— 


LONDON -< — 
Oshawa 
Peterborough 
Rouyn-Val d'Or 
Saint John 
Sarnia 
Sudbury 

TIMMINS-KIRKLAND 
LAKE -< — 
Victoria 








CHARLOTTETOWN 


^ 


Barrie 


Moose Jaw 






RIVIERE DU LOUP 


"^ — 


BRANDON -< 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 


Thetford-Lac Megantic- 
Ville St. Georges 




CHATHAM -4 — 
Lethbridge 






(labour force 25.000-75.000; 






NORTH BATTLEFORD -< — 
Prince Albert 






40 per cent or more in 






Red Deer 






agriculture) 






REGINA -< 

SASKATOON -4 — 
YORKTON •< — 








Bathurst 




Beauharnois 


Gait 






BRACEBRIDGE 


^ — 


Belleville-Trenton 


Listowel 






BRIDGEWATER 


~4 — 


BRAMPTON «< — 


St. Thomas 






CAMPBELLTON 


•< — 


Central Vancouver 


Stratford 






CHILLIWACK 




Island 


Woodstock- 






DAUPHIN 


p 


Cranbrook 


Tillsonburg 






DRUMMONDVILLE 


Dawson Creek 








EDMUNDSTON 




DRUMHELLER -< — 








GASPE 


^ — 


Fredericton 








GRAND FALLS 


-^ — 


GODERICH -< 








MONTMAGNY 


-^ — 


Kamloops 








NEWCASTLE 


■^ — 


KENTVILLE -< — 






MINOR AREAS 


OKANAGAN VALLEY 


^ — 


Lachute-Ste. Therese 






(labour force 10.000 to 25.000) 


Prince George-Quesnel 
PRINCE RUPERT 
QUEBEC NORTH 

SHORE 
RIMOUSKI 
STE. AGATHE- 

ST. JEROME 
St. Stephen 


J 


Lindsay 
Medicine Hat 

NORTH BAY -< — 
OWEN SOUND -< — 
PORTAGE LA 

PRAIRIE ■< — 
Pembroke 
Sault Ste. Marie 








SOREL 


£ 


SIMCOE -4 








SUMMERSIDE 


SWIFT CURRENT -< — 








TRURO 




TRAIL-NELSON -< — 








VALLEYFIELD 


-< 


ST. HYACINTHE -< — 








VICTORIAVILLE 


«— 


St. Jean 








WOODSTOCK 


*<— 


WEYBURN -< 








YARMOUTH 




WALKERTON -< — 







NOTE: Kitimat Labour Market Area is no longer included in this listing. 

^The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month ; an arrow indicates the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classification used see page 491, June 1963 issue. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



3! 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Sheltered Employment Expanding in Canada 

Examples from Edmonton, Toronto, Calgary, Ottawa and Sault 
Ste. Marie of development of sheltered workshop facilities 



Development of sheltered employment 
facilities is increasing throughout the 
country. An example is the Edmonton 
Sheltered Workshop, which has been 
providing service to the disabled of the 
community since 1955, and which on 
December 2 opened a "Goodwill" work- 
shop and store. This type of workshop 
receives discarded household articles and 
clothing, renovates and repairs them and 
sells them in the shop, thus providing many 
opportunities for training disabled persons 
in a variety of skills. 

Ontario Division CNIB 

The Ontario Division of the Canadian 
National Institute for the Blind also has 
instituted several new projects during the 
past year. A large adjustment-training 
centre in Toronto provided a three-month 
training program for 14 newly blind per- 
sons; eight were returned to employment 
and others were referred for further train- 
ing with the catering department. In addi- 
tion, facilities were re-arranged to provide 
space for 50 persons to be employed on 
subcontract work, with room for further 
expansion. 

A film-processing room was built for the 
training of blind X-ray technicians. Over the 
past 15 years, X-ray film processing has 
proved to be a satisfactory career for 
several blind persons, but training had to 
be arranged through hospital facilities. Ten 
blind persons are now employed in 
Ontario in this work; the training facilities 
will open the field to many more. 

On-the-job training in catering was 
provided for 43 persons and 17 were placed 
in positions before the end of the year. This 
brings to 246 the number of blind per- 
sons employed in this type of work. There 
are 487 blind persons employed in 
industrial jobs in outside firms. 

Handicapped Workers Make 
Christmas Seals 

The Calgary Rehabilitation Centre, which 
began manufacturing Christmas seals five 
years ago as a small sideline, has developed 
it into a major industry. 

Used Christmas cards are collected, sorted 
and sent to five disabled persons, confined to 
their homes, for cutting. They are returned 



to the centre, where other handicapped 
persons spray on the glue and package 
them. 

The seals that are made are larger than 
the usual ones, being about 3x3 inches in 
size, and fill a gap in the market. High 
standards of workmanship must be main- 
tained by all workers so that the seals sell 
on their own merit. 

Ottawa Neighbourhood Services 

The annual report of the Ottawa Neigh- 
bourhood Services, a self-sustaining salvage 
type of operation entirely dependent on 
the income derived from the sale of house- 
hold materials reconditioned by the handi- 
capped, indicates an expansion of activities. 

During the year employment was given to 
118 workers on a full- or part-time basis. 
Average rate of pay was $1.10 per hour. 
These 118 persons paid $5,768.75 in income 
tax. 

The report states, "For some this was their 
first job. For others it meant employment 
after years of idleness. For the older worker 
it meant part-time employment to supple- 
ment his pension. 

"Utilization of the skills of handicapped 
workers in productive employment is sound 
and necessary, both for the contribution 
these workers can make to our national 
productivity and from the sense of indepen- 
dence and well-being they can derive from 
doing a good job. 

"In our workshops handicapped people 
with virtually all types of disability are suc- 
cessfully performing jobs of almost every 
conceivable occupation because their 
abilities have been found to be adequate 
for job performances and their disabilities 
not to be a restricting factor." 

Sault Ste. Marie Workshop 

Operation Reclaim (Algoma) Inc., an- 
other salvage type of sheltered workshop 
formed in Sault Ste. Marie in June 1962, 
is already proving its value in the com- 
munity. The staff at present consists of 
eight persons, three of whom have never 
worked before. 

A branch of Marina Creations has also 
been organized in the Sault Ste. Marie area; 
about 12 disabled persons are participating 
and more are expected to join. 



32 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Older Workers 



Extend Older Worker Incentive Program 



Older Worker Employment and Training Incentive Program is 
extended from January 31 to March 31, Minister announces 

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister of 
Labour, announced last month that, among 
other changes, the hiring period under the 
Older Workers Employment and Training 



Incentive program had been extended from 
January 31, 1964 to March 31, 1964. 

Under this program, which went into 
effect on November 1, 1963, the Depart- 
ment of Labour will pay up to $75.00 a 
month to employers for each eligible older 
worker hired by them for a new job 
between November 1, 1963 and March 31, 
1964. Payments can be made for a total 
period up to 12 months. Eligible older 
workers must be aged 45 or over and have 
been unemployed for at least six of the 
previous nine months. 

Mr. MacEachen explained that this ex- 
tension of time will give employers more 
time to consider fully their manpower re- 
quirements and make any necessary adjust- 
ments in their hiring practices in order to 
take advantage of the program. At the 
same time an additional number of older 
workers would have the chance to benefit 
from the program. 

The Minister pointed out that the pro- 
gram involved an entirely new concept in 
hiring workers. It was an imaginative ex- 
periment designed to help overcome 
reluctance to hire older workers and to 
bring back to employment those older 
workers who were experiencing lengthy 
periods of unemployment. As such it had 
received the full endorsement of the Cana- 
dian Manufacturers' Association, the Cana- 
dian Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian 
Labour Congress, the Canadian Federation 
of Mayors and Municipalities, and other 
national organizations. The Provincial De- 
partments of Welfare were also giving their 
support and co-operation. 

Considerable interest in the program's 
possibilities has also been shown by in- 
dividual employers in all parts of Canada. 
It was, of course, realized that a program 
involving such a new idea and specifically 
timed to encourage increased employment 
during the traditional winter lull would be 
slow in starting. 

This timing had tended to slow down em- 
ployer response, since many of the job 
openings at this time of year were filled by 
re-hiring workers temporarily laid off. Dur- 
ing the first month of hiring, however, some 
325 applications were received from em- 
ployers. The extension of the hiring period 



would allow more time for job opportuni- 
ties to develop and it was expected the 
number would increase as the program 
gained momentum. 

The Minister also announced another 
important change in the program. He said 
that the requirement that applicants for 
employment under the program must have 
exhausted regular unemployment insurance 
benefits had been removed. As long as they 
were aged 45 or over and had been un- 
employed for at least six of the previous 
nine months they would be able to partici- 
pate. 

Removal of this requirement would enable 
many more older workers to participate in 
the benefits of the program. At the same 
time it would be likely to increase em- 
ployer interest, as it would provide them 
with a wider selection of older applicants 
from which to choose workers to fill new 
job openings. 

Mr. MacEachen explained that the serv- 
ices of the National Employment Offices 
across Canada were being utilized for the 
approval of eligibility for both workers and 
job openings. Officials of local employ- 
ment offices were also making direct con- 
tacts with employers to encourage them 
to take advantage of the program. 

The Minister pointed out that it was hoped 
that close observation of the development 
and response to this new experimental con- 
cept of hiring would result in a significant 
contribution toward solution of the older 
worker problem. It was quite possible, he 
thought, that information gained from an 
evaluation of the program might be helpful 
in planning future action on behalf of older 
workers. 

There were a great many capable older 
workers, with many years of useful service 
ahead of them, who were frequently 
turned down for employment because they 
lacked up-to-date work experience in busi- 
ness or industry. Lengthy periods of unem- 
ployment tended to intensify this lack of 
experience and make it increasingly dif- 
ficult for them to find jobs. 

The Older Worker Employment and 
Training Incentive Program was designed 
to assist such workers to gain the up-to-date 
knowledge and experience needed for jobs 
in modern industry. The incentive payments 
will assist employers during the period 
needed to bring an older worker up to full 
productivity. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3— 3 



• JANUARY 1964 



33 



Women's Bureau 



Working Women in Australia 



Women make up one quarter of Australia's labour force, and 
between 1954 and 1961, female labour force grew 25.3 per cent 



In Australia there are 1,059,158* women 
in the labour force, making up one quarter 
of all workers. 

The 1961 census disclosed a striking dif- 
ference between the rates of growth of the 
male and female labour force, the female 
labour force having increased by 25.3 per 
cent between 1954 and 1961 and the male 
labour force by 10.8 per cent. 

Where they work — Manufacturing em- 
ploys 23.9 per cent of women workers; com- 
merce, 22.2 per cent; community and busi- 
ness services, including the professions, 
21.5 per cent; and amusement, hotels and 
personal services, 12.8 per cent. More than 
half the workers are women in a number 
of branches of manufacturing, textiles, boots 
and shoes, pharmaceutical and toilet prep- 
arations, confectionery and tobacco. Wo- 
men are more than one quarter of those 
employed in food processing, plastic mould- 
ing, sheetmetal work, foundry casting and 
printing. In health services they comprise 
nearly three quarters of the total and in 
social welfare they make up approximately 
half. 

The number of women engaged in the 
professions is not yet available from the 
1961 census but up to the present time cer- 
tain professions have become "feminine" 
and women tend to concentrate in these. 
They include school teaching, library work, 
social service, physiotherapy and research. 
The number of women in medicine, archi- 
tecture, law, engineering and the wider fields 
of administration is negligible. 

Their ages — Young women predominate. 
The 1954 census revealed that 40 per cent 
of working women were between 15 and 
24 years of age. The relatively smaller pro- 
portions in the higher age groups reflect the 
large-scale withdrawal of women from the 
labour force after age 24. It is expected that 
the 1961 census will reveal further addi- 
tions in the younger age groups because of 
the high birth rate in the immediate post- 
war years. 

Married women — At the time of the 1954 
census, married women comprised 30.4 per 
cent of the total female labour force and 
12.6 per cent of all married women were in 
employment. Those with family responsi- 
bilities make up the largest portion of part- 
time workers. Most are employed in 



* Figures are from the 1961 census unless stated 
otherwise. 



domestic service and other service occupa- 
tions and in sales and office work. Except in 
the case of domestic service, part-time em- 
ployment is usually offered by employers 
to cope with peak hours of activity. 

Day nurseries which care for the 
children of working mothers are set up 
mainly in the highly industrialized areas but 
are not numerous. Normally employers do 
not provide such facilities at the place of 
work. They are usually financed by volun- 
tary effort but some receive state and 
municipal assistance. 

Except in the public services of two 
states there is no legal requirement for 
maternity leave. 

Equal pay for equal work — In Australia 
wages are fixed through arbitral tribunals 
established in pursuance of commonwealth 
or state legislation and are made up of 
two parts, the basic rate applicable to all 
workers and additional compensatory mar- 
gins which depend on the nature of the 
work to be performed. In the majority of 
cases women are granted both a lower mar- 
gin and a lower proportion of the male 
basic wage. In a few awards women are 
granted an equal margin but only 75 per 
cent of the male basic wage. 

The State of New South Wales enacted 
legislation in 1958 to provide for equal 
pay by 1963 for certain groups of women 
workers performing work of the same 
nature and of equal value to that performed 
by men. The legislation applied to less than 
10 per cent of the women workers in the 
State. 

Women in the Commonwealth Public 
Service performing the same work as men 
receive equal margins but only 75 per cent 
of the male basic wage. The Common- 
wealth Government has consistently refused 
to legislate for equal pay as it believes that 
application of the principle is a matter for 
determination in the first instance by the 
Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitra- 
tion Commission. 

Participation in trade unions — Well over 
half of the trade unions affiliated with the 
Australian Confederation of Trade Unions 
have women members. The largest num- 
ber are in the Clothing Trades Union, 
followed by the Clerks Federation, and the 
Textile Workers Union. In only seven 
unions do women hold branch office and 
state office; in only two are there women 
officers at the federal level. 



34 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 

Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I — Agreements Expiring During January, February and March 

(except those under negotiation in December) 

Company and Location Union 

Assn. Patronale du Commerce, (Hardware), 

Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers, garages (various), Vancouver, B.C. Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Automatic Electric, Brockville, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Telephone B.C. Telephone Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Burns & Co. (Eastern), Kitchener, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Burns & Co. (6 plants), western Canada Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Packers (8 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que. Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. General Electric, Cobourg, Oakville, 

Peterborough & Toronto, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant & salaried 

empl.) 

Cdn. General Electric, Montreal & Quebec, Que. I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Vickers (Engineering Div.), Montreal, Que. Boilermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Machinists 

AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Cluett Peabody, Kitchener & Stratford, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/- 

CLC) 

CNR, system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

CPR, system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Dominion Engineering, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar Newsprint, Dolbeau, Que Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Glove Mfrs. Assn., Loretteville, Montreal, St. 

Raymond & St. Tite, Que Clothing Workers' Federation (CNTU) 

Hamilton General Hospitals, Hamilton, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Hospitals (10), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Legrade Inc. & Eastern Abattoirs, Montreal & 

Quebec, Que Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lever Bros., Toronto, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical & 

maintenance empl.) 

Moirs Limited & Moirs Sales, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Northern Electric, London, Qnt Empl. Assn., (Ind.) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Philips Electronics, Leaside, Ont I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

RCA Victor, Montreal, Que I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ready-mix concrete companies, Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Swift Cdn. (6 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto Metro., Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto Metro., Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During December 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont. .. Teamsters (Ind.) 
Assn. Patronale des Inst. Religieuses (5 

hospitals), St. Hyacinthe & other centres, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 
Assn. Patronale des Mfrs. de Chaussures, Que- 

bee, Que Leather & Shoe Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Bowaters Nfld. Pulp & Paper, Corner Brook, 

Nfld Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

nT) „ mj Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

CBC, company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL- 

c-a ^ CIO/CLC) 
Cdn. General Electric, Guelph, Peterborough & 

Toronto, Ont tje (Ind) 

Cdn. Marconi, Montreal Que Z."."ZZ Salaried Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

caI' v 6 ! 1 Fo ™ dn ™> Montreal, Que Steel & Foundry Wkrs (Ind.) 

l^l^-^r^^r. ^^%^^SA^ 

CNR, CPR & other railways .LilZZ^ZZ: U^ZZ ^S^r^empl.) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 

73306-3— 3J 35 



Company and Location Union 

CNR & Ontario Northland Railway Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

CPR, system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Minine & Smelting, Trail, Kimber- 

ley, Riondel & Salmo, B.C Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Crane Limited, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Davie Shipbuilding, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

G. T. Davie & Sons, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Dominion Corset, Quebec, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Stores, Toronto & other centres, Ont. Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Textile, Montreal, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Textile, Montmorency, Sherbrooke, 

Magog, & Drummondville, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Dress Mfrs. Guild (Sportswear Div.), Toronto, 

Ont Ladies' Garment Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dupuis Freres, Montreal, Que. Commerce & Office Empl. (CNTU) 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Hollinger Gold Mines, Timmins, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

International Nickel, Thompson, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kelly, Douglas & Co., Vancouver & other 

centres, B.C Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Manitoba Rolling Mill, Selkirk, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marine Industries, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel., company-wide, N.S I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Montreal Cottons, Valleyfield, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Nfld. Employers' Assn., St. John's, Nfld Longshoremen's Protective Union (Ind.) 

Ottawa City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, Ottawa, Ont. Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Polymer Corp., Sarnia, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission, Montreal & 

other centres, Que Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Regina General Hospital, Regina, Sask Public Empl. (CLC) 

Shawinigan Water & Power, province-wide, Que. Public Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 
Soo-Security Motorways, Ont., Man., Sask. & 

Alta Teamsters (Ind.) 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

TCA, company-wide Sales Empl. (Ind.) 

Toronto Board of Education, Toronto, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (caretakers) 

Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, .Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

University Hospital, Saskatoon, Sask Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. .. Public Empl. (CLC) 
Vancouver Police Commissioners Board, Van- 
couver, B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg Metro., Man Public Empl. (CLC) 

Winnipeg Metro. (Transit Dept.), Man Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Cyanamid of Canada (Welland Plant), Niagara 

Falls, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domil Limited, Sherbrooke, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum, Montreal, Que. CNTU-chartered local 

Handbag Mfrs. Council, Montreal, Que Leather & Plastic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines, Schumacher, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Page-Hersey Tubes, Welland, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

Smith & Stone, Georgetown, Ont. Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Conciliation Board 

CBC, company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

DuPont of Canada, Maitland, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, 

B.C Various unions 

Mediation Board 

Manitoba Hydro I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

Council of Printing Industries, Toronto, Ont Typographical Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers (5 
hospitals), Drummondville & other centres, 

Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

-36 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Company and Location Union 
Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, Que- 
bec, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (female 

empl.) 
Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, Que- 
bec, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (male 

empl.) 
Hospitals (13), Montreal and other centres, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (registered 

nurses) 

Hotel Dieu St. Vallier, Chicoutimi, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Quebec Natural Gas, Montreal, Que Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Work Stoppage 

(No cases during December) 

Part III— Settlements Reached During December 1963 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures on 
the number of employees covered are approximate.) 

CBC Company-wide— Public Empl. (ARTEC) (CLC): 3-yr. agreement covering 2,100 
empl.— wage increases of 3% eff. April 1, 1963, 3% eff. April 1, 1964 and 3% eff. April 1, 1965 — 
compounded; agreement to expire March 31, 1966. ' 

Cdn. Western Natural Gas, Calgary, & Northwestern Utilities, Edmonton, Alta. — 
Empl. Welfare Assn. (Ind.) & Empl. Benefit Assn. (Ind.): 1-yr. agreement covering 850 
permanent empl. and 350 temporary empl. in office and plant units — wage change of $20 a mo. 
to all basic salary ranges which includes $10 which had previously been part of cost-of-living bonus 
(increase varies from lf% for top ranges to 3% for lower ranges with an average increase of 
2$%); wage increase of 80 an hr. (40 an hr. retroactive to July 1, 1963), plus an adjustment of 
60 an hr. which had previously been part of cost-of-living bonus, on hourly rates for temporary 
empl.; 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service (formerly after 30 yrs.) eff. Jan. 1, 1964; board 
and lodging now paid for all labourers required to work away from their home base; rates for 
labourers $1.88 to $2.05 an hr.; agreement to expire Dec. 31, 1964. 

Commission des Ecoles Catholiques, Montreal, Que. — Public Service Empl. Federa- 
tion (CNTU) (maintenance empl.): 2-yr. agreement covering 600 empl. — general wage in- 
crease of $200 a yr. retroactive to July 1963; additional wage increase of $100 a yr. for 
labourers and caretakers' helpers eff. July 1964; long-service bonuses — $104 after 10 to 14 yrs. 
of service, $156 after 15 to 19 yrs. of service, $208 after 20 to 24 yrs. of service and $260 after 25 
yrs. of service — eff. July 1965; rate for labourer in July 1964 will be $4,055 a yr.; agreement to 
expire June 30, 1965. 

Denison Mines, Elliot Lake, Ont. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement 
covering 870 empl. — general wage increase of 50 an hr. and for hoistmen with compressor's 
papers, 20 an hr. additional eff. Sept. 1, 1964; in the even* of a shutdown, severance pay to be 
$6 per mo. of continuous employment from last date of hiring for a maximum of $450 up to 
Sept. 1, 1964 and $500 if the shutdown occurs after that date; rate for labourer on Sept. 1, 
1964 will be $2.10 an hr.; agreement to expire Aug. 31, 1965. 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Trenton, N.S.— Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement 
covering 700 empl. — —wage increases of 20 an hr. retroactive to Dec. 31, 1962 and 3i0 an hr. 
eff. Dec. 1, 1964; employer to contribute 20 an hr. additional to welfare plan retroactive to 
Dec. 1, 1962; employer to contribute 3i-0 an hr. additional to pension plan eff. Dec. 1, 1964; rate 
for labourer on Dec. 1, 1964 will be $1,641 an hr.; agreement to expire Dec. 1, 1965. 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. & Eastern Electric, company-wide, N.S. — I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/- 
CLC) (plant empl.): 2-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — wage increases of $1 to $3.25 a wk.; 1 
wk. vacation after 1 yr. of service, 2 wks. vacation after 2 yrs. of service and 3 wks. vacation 
after 3 yrs. of service (formerly 2 wks. vacation for empl. with less than 15 yrs. of service and 
3 wks. vacation after 15 yrs. of service) and 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service; if vacations 
are taken between Nov. 1 and April 30, 2 wks. vacation to be extended by 2 days, 3 wks. vaca- 
tion to be extended by 4 days, and 4 wks. vacation to be extended by 5 days; rates for labourer 
$45 to $98.45 a wk.; agreement to expire Dec. 31, 1965. 

TCA, Canada-wide — Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC): settlement pay of $60 for time worked 
between July 1 and Nov. 4, 1963 and wage increase of 4% eff. Nov. 5, 1963 on wage reopener 
provided for in 2-yr. agreement covering 4,400 empl.; base rate for labourer $1.89 an hr.; agree- 
ment to expire June 29, 1964. 

Toronto Transit Commission, Toronto, Ont. — Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 
27-mo. agreement covering 4,600 empl. — wage increases of 50 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 50 an 
hr. eff. Oct. 1, 1964 and 50 an hr. eff. July 1, 1965 for unskilled empl.; wage increases of 60 an 
hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 60 an hr. eff. Oct. 1, 1964 and 60 an hr. eff. July 1, 1965 for operators; 
wage increases of 70 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 70 an hr. eff. Oct. 1, 1964 and 70 an hr. eff. 
July 1, 1965 for skilled tradesmen; night shift premium of 50 an hr. for non-uniformed empl. 
introduced; benefits from contributory welfare plan to be $11 a day in 1964 (formerly $10 a day) 
and $12 a day in 1965 with payments beginning on second day of illness instead of on third day; 
bereavement leave of 1 day; rate for labourer will be $2.20 an hr. and rate for operator will be 
$2.48 an hr. on July 1, 1965; agreement to expire March 31, 1966. 

Wabasso Cotton, Grand'mere, Shawinigan & Three Rivers, Que. — United Textile Wkrs. 
(AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 2,200 empl. — wage increases of 50 an hr. retro- 
active to June 1, 1963 and 50 an hr. eff. Nov. 28, 1964; night shift premium increased to 100 from 
90 an hr.; new provision for 3 days bereavement leave in the event of death of father, mother, 
spouse and children; weekly indemnity to be $25 (formerly $20) for single empl. and $30 
(formerly $25) for married empl.; agreement to expire Dec. 1, 1965. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 37 



TFUIMORK 
in INDUSTRY 



No strike and no major industrial rela- 
tions trouble in 50 years is the proud 
record of labour and management at Domin- 
ion Forge Limited, Windsor, Ont., manu- 
facturers of crankshafts, connecting rods 
and other components for the automobile 
industry. 

Dominion Forge's personnel manager 
Ernie Marks thinks that this achievement is 
the result of an amalgam of two-way loyalty, 
maturity and patience, social pressures 
within the plant, and the presence of family 
characteristics arising from close working 
relationships between long-term employees 
and long-term management. 

"Our good relations were created out of 
the responsible attitudes of both manage- 
ment and employees," said Mr. Marks. "I 
think the maturity in this plant developed 
over the years out of sincere attempts by 
labour and management to show considera- 
tion for each other." 

Dave Orloph, president of United Auto 
Workers Local 195 for 22 of the past 24 
years, explained the high level of relations 
in the plant by saying that management and 
the union prefer to use good judgment and 
common sense rather than argument. "There 
isn't one problem that can't be straightened 
out by labour-management discussion," he 
declared. 

Albert Elson, serving the Windsor area 
as industrial relations officer with the federal 
Labour-Management Co-operation Service, 
reported: "What labour and management 
have at Dominion Forge is a genuine two- 
way street. They also have the assets on 
both sides to handle any problems that 
come their way." 

As a result of the latest negotiations at 
Dominion Forge, a profit-sharing plan was 
introduced. The plan recognizes that the 
success of the company and the security of 
the employee depend on the co-operative 
and loyal efforts of everyone. Consequently 
each employer has a personal stake in the 
company's operations. 

Management sees to it that there is joint 
consultation on all issues affecting the wel- 
fare of the plant and its people. There is 
frequent discussion on contracts. Said Mr. 



Orloph: "To meet the cost and delivery 
requirements involved in defence contracts 
with the United States, the union will up 
daily production. It can always be done 
somehow." 

The firm's pension plan itself is the prod- 
uct of labour-management consultation. 
Former company president Robert T. 
Herdegen was the man chiefly responsible 
for management's part in originating the 
basic plan in 1949-50, but its final form 
was jointly determined by a pension com- 
mittee composed of three company and 
three union representatives. Company and 
union actuaries also jointly debated the 
various financial intricacies involved. The 
plan, which pays $140 a month to each re- 
tired employer with 25 years service, was 
recently acclaimed by George Burt, Cana- 
dian director of the UAW, as a credit to 
labour and management at Dominion Forge. 

"What we've all learned," declared local 
president Orloph, "is that teamwork puts 
money in the pockets of both union and 
management." 

Company vice-president and general man- 
ager Herbert Young stated recently that the 
only meaningful security in industry is a 
profitable company to which labour is con- 
tributing the weight of its energy and skills. 
"This is a thought that should be conveyed 
oftener by management to trade unions," 
he said. 

* * * 

"Labour and management tend to blame 
government for the problems that confront 
them but they know deep in their hearts that 
these problems could be resolved if both 
parties sat down and discussed them honest- 
ly," said Marcel Pepin, general secretary of 
the Confederation of National Trade Unions 
during an address to the recent Labour- 
Management Committee Area Conference 
in Alma, Que. 

Mr. Pepin urged that labour and man- 
agement together work out an effective 
formula to make the worker as interested in 
his job as he would be if he owned the 
business which employs him. The employee 
today is in this sense virtually a stranger to 
the enterprise in which he works, he said. 
"If such a formula is not found," declared 
Mr. Pepin, "the conflict between labour 
and management will continue forever." 

The Alma meeting was Canada's first 
conference of labour-management commit- 
tees conducted entirely in French, and there 
was 100-per-cent representation of LMCs in 
the Saguenay-Lac St. Jean area. 



Establishment of Labour-Management Committees is encouraged and assisted by the 
Labour-Management Co-operation Service, Industrial Relations Branch, Department of 
Labour. In addition to field representatives located in key industrial centres, who are 
available to help both managements and trade unions, the Service provides various aids in 
the form of booklets, posters and films. 



38 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



CERTIFICATION AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board did 
not meet during November. During the 
month the Board received five applications 
for certification, one application for revoca- 
tion of certification, one application under 
Section 19 of the Act for a provision for 
the final settlement of differences concern- 
ing the meaning or violation of a collective 
agreement, and two requests under Section 
61(2) of the Act for reviewing of earlier 
decisions. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. Association of Canadian Television 
and Radio Artists, on behalf of a unit of 
staff announcers and staff performers 
employed by Baton Broadcasting Limited, 
Agincourt, Ont. (Investigating Officer: A. 
B. Whitfield). 

2. Transport Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers' Union, Local 106, of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, on behalf of a unit of employees 
of Martel Express Ltd., Farnham, Que. 
(Investigating Officer: Miss M.-P. Bigras). 

3. Transport Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers' Union, Local 106, of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, on behalf of a unit of drivers, 
helpers and warehousemen employed by 
Transport D'Anjou Inc., Riviere-du-Loup, 
Que. (Investigating Officer: Miss M.-P. 
Bigras). 

4. Miscellaneous Workers, Wholesale and 
Retail Delivery Drivers and Helpers, Local 
351, of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit of 
employees of O'Connor Transport Limited, 
North Burnaby, B.C. (Investigating Officer: 
G. H. Purvis). 



5. Communications Workers of America, 
on behalf of a unit of employees of the 
British Columbia Telephone Company, Van- 
couver, B.C. (traffic division) (Investigat- 
ing Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

Application for Revocation Received 

Ian Byers, et ah, applicants, Kitchener- 
Waterloo Broadcasting Co. Ltd., Kitchener, 
Ont., respondent, and the National Associa- 
tion of Broadcast Employees and Tech- 
nicians, respondent. The application was for 
the revocation of the certification issued by 
the Board on June 22, 1960 in respect of a 
unit of employees of Kitchener-Waterloo 
Broadcasting Co. Ltd. (L.G. 1960, p. 812). 

Application under Section 19 Received 

Application for the provision for final 
settlement of differences concerning the 
meaning or violating of the collective agree- 
ment between the Atlantic Shipping Agen- 
cies, et ah, as represented by the Shipping 
Federation of Canada, Inc., applications, and 
the General Longshore Workers of the Port 
of Saint John, N.B., Local 273, of the 
International Longshoremen's Association, 
respondent. 

Requests for Review Received 

1. Request for review of the certificate 
issued by the Board on May 26, 1962 affect- 
ing the Canadian Wire Service Guild Local 
213, American Newspaper Guild, applicant, 
and the Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion, respondent (L.G. 1952, p. 912). 

2. Request for review of the certificate 
issued by the Board on May 15, 1953 affect- 
ing the Canadian Wire Service Guild Local 
213, American Newspaper Guild, applicant, 
and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 
respondent (L.G. (1953, p. 1020). 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During November, the Minister of 
Labour appointed conciliation officers to 
deal with the following disputes: 



1. Central Truck Lines Ltd., Val d'Or, 
Que., and local 938 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 
(Conciliation Officer: C. E. Poirier). 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



39 



2. The Bell Telephone Company of Cullen Stevedoring Co. Limited, Pittston 
Canada, Montreal, and Traffic Employees' Stevedoring Corporation of Canada Limited, 
Association (Conciliation Officer: C. E. Brown & Ryan Ltd., and Economic Steve- 
Poirier). doring Corporation and Local 1869 of the 

3. Pacific Western Airlines, Vancouver International Longshoremen's Association 
(I.F.R. and V.F.R. Divisions) and Canadian (Conciliation Officer: T. B. McRae) (L.G., 
Air Line Pilots' Association (Conciliation Dec. 1963, p. 1116). 

Officer: G. R. Currie). 3. The Bell Telephone Company of 

4. Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Canada, Montreal, and Traffic Employees' 
Merchandise Services Department, Prairie Association (Conciliation Officer: C. E. 
and Pacific Regions (Clerical Staffs) and Poirier) (see abo ve). 

Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 

Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Conciliation Boards Appointed 
Station Employees (Conciliation Officer: G. 

R. Currie). 1- Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited 

(laboratory department employees), 

Settlements by Conciliation Officers Humberstone, Ont., and United Packing- 

1. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, house> Food and A llied Workers (L.G., 
Chalk River, Ont., and Chalk River Atomic A •, 1Q ^ -, 1fh 

Energy Draftsmen, Local 1569, CLC (Con- ^ P ' P ' J ' 

ciliation Officer: T. B. McRae) (L.G., Dec. 2 - Robin Hood Flour Mllls Limited (plant 

1963, p. 1116). employees), Humberstone, Ont., and 

2. The Toronto Harbour Commissioners, United Packinghouse, Food and Allied 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Co. Limited, Workers (L.G., Oct. 1963, p. 899). 

Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 

Conciliation service under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 
are provided by the Minister of Labour through the Industrial Relations Branch. The 
branch also acts as the administrative arm of the Canada Labour Relations Board in 
matters under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act came into force on September 
1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, which became 
effective in March, 1944, and repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, which 
had been in force from 1907 until superseded by the Wartime Regulations in 1944. 
Decisions, orders and certificates given under the Wartime Regulations by the Minister 
of Labour and the Wartime Labour Relations Board are continued in force and effect by 
the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, interprovincial and international steamship lines 
and ferries, aerodromes and air transportation, radio broadcasting stations and works 
declared by Parliament to be for the general advantage of Canada or two or more of 
its provinces. Additionally, the Act provides that provincial authorities, if they so desire, may 
enact similar legislation for application to industries within provincial jurisdiction and 
make mutually satisfactory arrangements with the federal Government for the administra- 
tion of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of conciliation officers, conciliation boards, and Industrial 
Inquiry Commissions concerning complains that the Act has been violated or that a party 
has failed to bargain collectively, and for application for consent to prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is established under the Act as successor to 
the Wartime Labour Relations Board to administer provisions concerning the certification 
of bargaining agents; the writing of provisions — for incorporation into collective agree- 
ments — that fix a procedure for the final settlement of disputes concerning the meaning 
or violation of such agreements; and the investigation of complaints referred to it by the 
minister that a party has failed to bargain collectively and to make every reasonable effort 
to conclude a collective agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations Board 
are available upon request to the Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported here under two headings: (1) Certification and other Proceedings before the 
Canada Labour Relations Board and (2) Conciliation and other Proceedings before the 
Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the Department of Labour are stationed at Vancouver, 
Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, Newfoundland. 
The territory of four officers resident in Vancouver comprises British Columbia, Alberta 
and the Yukon and Northwest Territories; two officers stationed in Winnipeg cover the 
province of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario; four officers resident 
in Toronto confine their activities to Ontario; five officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and St. 
John's represent the Department in the Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations Branch and the Director of Industrial Relations 
and staff are situated in Ottawa. 

40 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



Supreme Court of Canada confirms constitutional validity of 
B.C. legislation prohibiting use of union dues for political 
purposes. Ontario High Court finds collective agreement no 
bar to action for recovery of unpaid vacation pay, rules tips 
are part of minimum wage, disqualifies Labour Relations Board 
member, and enjoins peaceful picketing by an uncertified union 



The Supreme Court of Canada, by a 
majority decision, upheld the constitutional 
validity of the British Columbia legislation 
prohibiting the use of union dues for poli- 
tical purposes as being legislation within the 
powers of the British Columbia Legislature 
under Section 92(13) — Property and civil 
rights in the Province — of the BNA Act. 

In Ontario, the High Court ruled that a 
collective agreement, and the provisions of 
the Ontario Labour Relations Act regard- 
ing arbitration of disputes under collective 
agreement, are not a bar to an employee's 
suing in ordinary courts for unpaid vaca- 
tion pay owed to him. 

In another decision, considering the word- 
ing of the definition of wages in the Ontario 
Minimum Wage Act (before the 1962-63 
amendment), the Court ruled that tips 
received by a waitress had to be considered 
wages, and hence were calculable in deter- 
mining whether the employer had complied 
with the minimum wage provisions of the 
Act. 

In another decision, the Court, in dis- 
qualifying a member of the Labour Rela- 
tions Board from hearing an application for 
certification, ruled that since the Board is 
a quasi-judicial tribunal, its members must 
act judicially in discharge of their duties 
and any of them should disqualify them- 
selves if there is bias or a reasonable like- 
lihood of bias; the test of reasonable like- 
lihood of bias is an objective consideration 
of whether a reasonable person in all the 
circumstances might suppose that there 
would be an improper interference, con- 
scious or unconscious, with the course of 
justice if the challenged member heard the 
application. 

In another decision, the Court enjoined 
peaceful picketing conducted in disregard 
of the procedures outlined in the Labour 
Relations Act and held such picketing 
illegal as interfering with the rights of 
citizens to carry on their business. 



Supreme Court of Canada . . . 

. . . upholds validity of B.C. law banning 
use of union dues for political purposes 

On October 1, 1963, the Supreme Court 
of Canada, dismissing an appeal from a 
decision of the British Columbia Court of 
Appeal, by a majority decision of four to 
three held that Section 9 (6) of the British 
Columbia Labour Relations Act, which pro- 
hibits the use Of union dues for support of 
political parties, was within the legislative 
competence of the Legislature of British 
Columbia. The Section was added in 1961 
by the Labour Relations Act Amendment 
Act. 

Prior to its amendment in 1961, Section 
9 of the British Columbia Labour Relations 
Act contained, inter alia, the following pro- 
visions: 

S. 9(1) Every employer shall honour a 
written assignment of wages to a trade-union 
certified under this Act, except where the 
assignment is declared null and void by a Judge 
or is revoked by the assignor. 

... (3) Except where an assignor of wages 
revokes the assignment by giving the employer 
written notice of the revocation, or except 
where a Judge declares an assignment to be 
null and void, the employer shall remit at 
least once each month, to the trade-union 
certified under this Act and named in the 
assignment as assignee, the fees and dues 
deducted, together with a written statement 
containing the names of the employees for 
whom the deductions were made and the 
amount of each deduction. 

In 1961, the Labour Relations Act 
Amendment Act added to Section 9 a new 
subsection (6), which provides as follows: 

6(a) No employer and no one acting on 
behalf of an employer shall refuse to employ 
or to continue to employ a person and no 
one shall discriminate against a person in 
regard to employment only because that per- 
son refuses to make a contribution or expendi- 
ture to or on behalf of any political party or 
to or on behalf of a candidiate for political 
office. 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3—4 



• JANUARY 7964 



41 



(b) No trade-union and no person acting on 
behalf of a trade-union shall refuse member- 
ship to or refuse to continue membership of 
a person in a trade-union, and no one shall 
discriminate against a person in regard to 
membership in a trade-union or in regard 
to employment only because that person 
refuses to make or makes a contribution or 
expenditure, directly or indirectly, to or on 
behalf of any political party or to or on 
behalf of a candidate for political office. 

(c)(i) No trade-union and no person acting 
on behalf of a trade-union shall directly or 
indirectly contribute to or expend on behalf 
of any political party to or on behalf of 
any candidate for political office any moneys 
deducted from an employee's wages under 
sub-section (1) or a collective agreement, or 
paid as a condition of membership in the 
trade-union. 

(ii) Remuneration of a member of a trade- 
union for his services in an official union 
position held by him while seeking election or 
upon being elected to public office is not a 
violation of this clause. 

(d) Notwithstanding any other provisions of 
this Act or the provisions of any collective 
agreement, unless the trade-union delivers to 
the employer who is in receipt of an assign- 
ment under subsection (1) or who is party to 
a collective agreement, a statutory declaration, 
made by an officer duly authorized in that 
behalf, that the trade-union is complying with 
and will continue to comply with clause (c) 
during the term of the assignment or during 
the term of the collective agreement, neither 
the employer nor a person acting on behalf 
of the employer shall make any deduction 
whatsoever from the wages of an employee 
on behalf of the trade union. 

(e) Any moneys deducted from the wages 
of an employee and paid to a trade-union that 
does not comply with this subsection are the 
property of the employee, and the trade-union 
is liable to the employee for any moneys so 
deducted. 

Local 16-601 of the Oil, Chemical and 
Atomic Workers International Union was 
certified, under the provisions of the Labour 
Relations Act, as the bargaining agent for 
a group of employees of Imperial Oil 
Limited at its refinery at loco, B.C. Under 
the provisions of the collective agreement, 
the company had agreed to honour writ- 
ten assignments of wages given by the em- 
ployees in that group in favour of Local 
16-601 and to remit to that Local each 
month the amount collected. 

After the enactment of subsection (6) 
of Section 9 of the Act, the company ad- 
vised the union that it could no longer 
honour the written assignments unless the 
union supplied it with the form of statutory 
declaration required by para. (d). The 
union refused to supply this and sued the 
company to compel it to honour the 
assignments, contending and seeking a 
declaration that para, (c), (d) and (e) of 
subsection (6) were ultra vires of the Legis- 
lature of the Province of British Columbia. 

The trial judge held that the statutory 
provisions under attack were intra vires of 



the Legislature of the Province of British 
Columbia (L.G. 1962, p. 219. This decision 
was affirmed by the unanimous judgment 
of the Court of Appeal of British Columbia 
(L.G., 1962, p. 1184). 

On appeal to the Supreme Court of 
Canada, the union contended that the 
clauses in question were ultra vires of the 
Legislature of the Province of British 
Columbia, on the ground that the authority 
to enact them is not to be found within any 
of the subsections of Section 92 of the 
British North America Act; that they relate 
to the subject of federal elections and that 
they seek to curtail the fundamental rights 
of Canadian citizens essential to the proper 
functioning of parliamentary institutions. 
Further, it argued that the contested clauses 
affect the political activity of trade unions, 
whose right to engage in such activity is 
beyond the powers of provincial legislation 
to curtail. 

The Attorney General of British Colum- 
bia, who intervened in the proceedings, 
submitted that the legislation in question 
was a limitation only of the power to use 
certain specified funds for particular pur- 
poses by trade unions; that this limitation 
is valid legislation in respect of the field of 
labour relations and that the Legislature of 
British Columbia has the authority to enact 
it as being within the field of property and 
civil rights in the province, within Section 
92(13) of the British North America Act. 

Mr. Justice Martland (with whom Justices 
Taschereau and Fauteux concurred) in his 
reasons for judgment said that in the case 
of Toronto Electric Commissioners v. 
Snider (1925) A.C. 396, it had been estab- 
lished beyond doubt that the field of legis- 
lation in relation to labour relations in a 
province is within the sphere of provincial 
legislative jurisdiction. This was not dis- 
puted by the union, which, however, con- 
tended that the clauses in question were 
not in respect of labour relations at all. 

In order to determine these issues, Mr. 
Justice Martland considered the provisions 
of the Labour Relations Act as a whole, 
and, in particular, the true purpose and 
effect of the clauses under attack. 

The object of the Labour Relations Act, 
as described by Mr. Justice MacDonald in 
Re Labour Relations Board (Nova Scotia) 
(L.G. 1952, p. 937), is to facilitate collective 
bargaining and stabilize industrial relations 
by enabling a union to establish before 
the Board its ability to represent a group 
of employees; and, with this controversial 
question settled, to require the employer, 
upon notice from the union, to negotiate 
with it and (with the aid of conciliation 
services) to promote the conclusions of an 



42 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



agreement which shall be legally enforce- 
able; and generally to ensure a greater 
measure of industrial peace to the public. 
Certification is, of course, not necessary 
for collective bargaining, but the policy 
of the Act undoubtedly is to promote it as 
a means to more orderly bargaining. 

The instrument for collective bargaining 
on behalf of employees is a trade union. 
Although it is theoretically possible for a 
collective agreement to be made with an 
uncertified trade union, it is possible for 
a trade union to become the bargaining 
agent for a unit of employees who are not 
all members of the union only by obtaining 
certification under the Act. In Mr. Justice 
Martland's opinion, it is clear that the Act 
is primarily concerned with the procedures 
necessary to obtain certification and col- 
lective bargaining after certification has 
been obtained. 

Those procedures materially affect the 
rights of employees in any unit suitable for 
collective bargaining and of their employer, 
who is compelled to bargain collectively with 
a certified trade union. The primary pur- 
pose of the Act is, therefore, to spell out 
the respective rights and obligations of the 
employer, the employee and the certified 
trade union, each of which is subject to its 
mandatory powers. 

A trade union, as defined in the Act, may 
obtain certification for a group of em- 
ployees in accordance with the statutory 
requirements. It may apply for certification 
if it claims to have as members in good 
standing a majority of the employees of 
that group. 

When a trade union has been certified 
by the Labour Relations Board, it has ex- 
clusive authority to bargain collectively on 
behalf of the unit and to bind the in- 
dividuals in that unit by a collective agree- 
ment. It can require an employer to enter 
into collective bargaining with a view to 
the making of a collective agreement, and 
such an agreement, when made, is binding, 
not only upon the trade union which has 
entered into the agreement, but also upon 
every employee covered by the agreement. 
Every person who is bound by a collective 
agreement is obligated, by the Act, to do 
everything he is required to do and to 
refrain from doing anything that he is 
required to refrain from doing by the pro- 
visions of the collective agreement. 

The position is, therefore, Mr. Justice 
Martland continued, that a trade union can, 
under the provisions of the Act, become the 
bargaining agent for all the employees 
within a particular unit, irrespective of the 
individual wishes of the minority of em- 
ployees within that group, and that it can 



then bind each of such employees by the 
collective agreement which it makes. It is 
placed in a position to persuade those em- 
ployees within the group who are not 
members of the union to seek member- 
ship, for it is now their bargaining agent, 
entering collective agreements on their 
behalf. In some instances, the form of 
the collective agreement which it makes 
may compel their contribution to its funds, 
whether they are members or not. 

In addition, Section 8 of the Act provides 
as follows: 

S. 8 Nothing in this Act shall be construed 
to preclude the parties to a collective agree- 
ment from inserting in the collective agree- 
ment a provision requiring, as a condition of 
employment, membership in a specified trade- 
union, or granting a preference of employ- 
ment to members of a specified trade-union, or 
to preclude the carrying out of such provi- 
sions. 

Where a collective agreement contains a 
provision of the kind contemplated in this 
section, membership in the trade union 
becomes a condition of employment within 
the group of employees in question and loss 
of membership automatically involves loss 
of employment. A person seeking employ- 
ment in such a group, or desiring to remain 
as an employee within it, has no alternative 
but to obtain membership in the trade union 
which is the bargaining agent, and, for that 
purpose, to pay to it such dues as are im- 
posed as a condition of membership in it. 

Next, Mr. Justice Martland dealt with the 
provisions of the clauses whose constitu- 
tional validity was challenged. He noted 
that the union's attack was mainly upon 
clause c(i), which prohibits a trade union 
from contributing to, or expending on 
behalf of a political party or a candidate 
for political office, directly or indirectly, 
moneys deducted from an employee's wages 
under the check-off (whether statutory or 
pursuant to a collective agreement), or paid 
to it as a condition of membership in the 
trade union. 

Clause c(i) deals first with funds ob- 
tained by the check-off, which is imposed 
under the statute by the provisions of S. 
9(1). The right of check-off was created by 
the statute and granted as a statutory 
privilege to the trade union. The Legisla- 
ture which conferred that statutory right 
could also take it away again. If the Legis- 
lature can eliminate the right entirely, in 
Mr. Justice Martland's opinion, it is equally 
possible for the Legislature to apply limita- 
tions in respect of its use. 

Regarding the provision as to member- 
ship dues paid by an employee to a trade 
union as a condition of his membership 
in it, counsel for the union argued that 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 

73306-3—4^ 



43 



membership fees paid to a trade union were 
its own property, which, as a voluntary 
association, it is entitled to disburse in such 
manner as its own constitution permits and 
as the majority of its membership decides; 
that a trade union is entitled to engage in 
political activities as a free association of 
individuals and, therefore, within the limits 
previously mentioned, could disburse its 
funds for such purposes, and any attempted 
interference with such powers by a provin- 
cial legislature would be an interference 
with the democratic process in Canada, and, 
therefore, beyond its powers. 

In Mr. Justice Martland's view, this argu- 
ment would have considerable force as 
applied to a purely voluntary association. 
However, the position of a trade union 
which has been certified as a bargaining 
agent under the Act is substantially dif- 
ferent. Such a union has, as a result of 
certification, ceased to be a purely volun- 
tary association of individuals. It has 
become a legal entity, with the status 
of a bargaining agent for a group of em- 
ployees, all of whom are thereby brought 
into association with it, whether as mem- 
bers, or as persons whom it can bind by a 
collective agreement even though not mem- 
bers. It must, as their agent, deal equitably 
with the members of the group which it 
represents. It is clothed with a power to 
make binding agreements which can compel 
membership in it as a condition of em- 
ployment. 

Mr. Justice Martland found it difficult to 
regard as a free, voluntary association of 
individuals an entity which, by statute, is 
clothed with a power to require member- 
ship in it, and to require the consequent 
payment of dues to it as the price which 
must be paid by an individual for the right 
to be employed in a particular employment 
group. 

Mr. Justice Martland stated that the 
Labour Relations Act has materially affected 
the civil rights of individual employees by 
conferring upon certified trade unions the 
power to bind them by agreement and the 
power to make agreements that will com- 
pel membership in a union. Such legisla- 
tion falls within the powers of the Legisla- 
ture of the Province of British Columbia 
to enact, as being labour legislation, and, 
therefore, relating to property and civil 
rights in the province. 

In Mr. Justice Martland's opinion, the 
legislation under attack in the case at bar 
does nothing more than to provide that 
the fee paid as a condition of membership 
in such an entity by each individual em- 
ployee cannot be expended for a political 



object which may not command his sup- 
port. That individual has been brought into 
association with the trade union by statu- 
tory requirement. The same legislation 
which requires this can protect his civil 
rights by providing that he cannot be com- 
pelled to assist in the financial promotion 
of political causes with which he disagrees. 
Such legislation is, in pith and substance, 
legislation in respect of civil rights in the 
province, Mr. Justice Martland concluded. 

Counsel for the union, relying on the 
judgment of Chief Justice Duff of the 
Supreme Court of Canada in the Alberta 
Act to Ensure the Publication of Accurate 
News and Information (1938) S.C.R. 100, 
contended that the legislation in issue cur- 
tailed the right of association to exercise 
the right of public discussion, and thus 
interfered with the working of the parlia- 
mentary institutions of Canada as con- 
templated by the provisions of the BNA 
Act and the statutes of the Dominion of 
Canada. 

In rejecting this argument, Mr. Justice 
Martland stated that the legislation in 
question did not affect the right of any 
individual to engage in any form of political 
activity which he might desire. It did not 
prevent a trade union from engaging in 
political activities. It did not prevent it from 
soliciting funds from its members for 
political purposes, or limit in any way the 
expenditure of funds so raised. It did, how- 
ever, prevent the use of funds obtained in 
particular ways from being used for politi- 
cal purposes. 

Further, Mr. Justice Martland added the 
question in issue was not as to the right to 
engage in political activity, but as to the 
existence of an unfettered right to use 
funds obtained in certain ways for the sup- 
port of a political party or candidate. If 
such legislation were required, a provincial 
legislature could prevent the contribution 
of trust funds for such a purpose and, 
equally, it could prevent the use by a 
corporation, created under provincial law, 
of funds derived from the sale of its bonds 
or shares for such a purpose. 

A trade union, when it becomes certified 
as a bargaining agent, becomes a legal 
entity (International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters v. Therien) (L.G. 1960, p. 276). 
When the Legislature clothes that entity 
with wide powers for the exaction of mem- 
bership fees by methods which previously 
it did not, in law, possess, it can set limits 
to the objects for which funds so obtained 
may be applied. Legislation of this kind 
is not a substantial interference with the 
working of parliamentary institutions. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



With reference to the decision of the 
Supreme Court in Switzman v. Elbling (L.G. 
1957, p. 983), where it was held that the 
Act Respecting Communistic Propaganda of 
the Province of Quebec was ultra vires of 
the Legislature of that province, counsel 
for the union argued that, even if the 
legislation were to be considered as, in 
pith and substance, designed to safeguard 
the fundamental right of an individual to 
support the party of his choice, it would 
still be ultra vires of a provincial legislature. 
It was contended that only the Canadian 
Parliament could legislate in relation to 
individual political freedom. As a provin- 
cial legislature could not legislate to dero- 
gate from such rights, conversely it could 
not legislate for their protection. In reject- 
ing this contention, Mr. Justice Martland 
stated that legislation that seeks to protect 
certain civil rights of individuals in a 
province from interference by other per- 
sons also in that province is legislation in 
respect of civil rights within the province. 

Finally, in support of the argument that 
legislation regarding contributions to federal 
political parties is a matter outside the 
sphere of a provincial legislature, counsel 
for the union pointed out that in 1930 the 
Parliament of Canada repealed the follow- 
ing provision of the Dominion Elections 
Act: 

No company or association other than one 
incorporated for political purposes alone shall 
directly or indirectly, contribute, loan, advance, 
pay or promise or offer to pay any money or 
its equivalent to, or for, or in aid of, any 
candidate at an election, or to, or for, or in 
aid of, any political party, committee, or 
association, or to, or for or in aid of, any 
company incorporated for political purposes, 
or to, or for, or in furtherance of, any political 
purpose whatever, or for the identification or 
reimbursement of any person for moneys so 
used. 

This, in the opinion of the union, showed 
that the legislation under review must have 
been an encroachment on the field reserved 
to the Parliament of Canada. 

Mr. Justice Martland disagreed. He stated 
that the repealed provision of the Dominion 
Elections Act did not enable an association 
or company to make contributions for poli- 
tical purposes. Actually, it forbade them. It 
does not follow that without that provision 
every association and company did have the 
legal right to make such contributions. The 
right of any association or company to do 
so would depend upon the scope of its law- 
ful authority, which, in certain cases, in 
any event, would depend upon the powers 
which had been conferred upon them by 
provincial legislation. 

Mr. Justice Martland concluded that for 
these reasons the union's appeal should be 
dismissed. 



Mr. Justice Ritchie, although concur- 
ring with Mr. Justice Martland, added, 
inter alia, that the addition of subsection 
(6) to Section 9 of the Act in 1961 was 
directed toward ensuring that legislative 
machinery involving the adjustment of 
civil rights that was created for the regula- 
tion of relations between employers and 
employees should not be used for the col- 
lection of political party funds or in such 
manner as to curtail the fundamental politi- 
cal rights of any individual employee. Just 
as it is within the power of the province 
under S. 92(13) of the BNA Act to create 
this legislative machinery for the purpose 
of furthering the cause of industrial peace, 
so it is within its power to control its use for 
the same purpose. 

Even if it could be said, Mr. Justice 
Ritchie added, that the legislation under 
attack had any effect on political elections, 
such effect could only be incidental and 
this would not alter the fact that the amend- 
ment in question is part and parcel of legis- 
lation passed "in relation to" labour rela- 
tions and not "in relation to" elections, 
either provincial or federal. The legislation 
under review has the effect of ensuring 
that associations which have been given 
a controlling power over their members 
by provincial legislation are not to be 
permitted to use that power for the pur- 
pose of compelling such members to sup- 
port a political party not of their own 
choice. Mr. Justice Ritchie concluded that 
Section 9(6) (c) and (d) of the Labour 
Relations Act Amendment Act 1961 was 
within the legislative competence of the 
Legislature of British Columbia. 

In a dissenting opinion, Mr. Justice Jud- 
son held that the legislation in question was 
ultra vires of the provincial legislature for 
the following reasons. 

In his opinion, the union's submission 
that the matters dealt with in the ques- 
tioned clauses do not fall within the field 
of labour relations but are in relation to the 
political activity of trade unions is an 
accurate characterization of this legislation. 
Section 9(c) has no relationship whatever 
to trade union action designed to promote 
collective bargaining, to change conditions 
of employment or the contract of employ- 
ment. Its sole object and purpose is to pre- 
vent trade unions from making these con- 
tributions out of their own moneys. The 
leading feature of the legislation is the pro- 
hibition, found in clause (c), of political 
contributions by trade unions. 

Further, the legislation in question is 
directly related to elections, including 
federal elections. In his view, the provin- 
cial legislature has no power to restrict the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



45 



right of any person or organization within 
the province to make contributions at 
federal elections and to federal candidates. 
There was at one time such a restriction in 
the Dominion legislation and this provision 
was repealed in 1930. The Canada Elections 
Act 1960 c. 39 contemplates, in terms broad 
enough to include a trade union, the mak- 
ing of contributions to aid expenditures on 
behalf of political parties and candidates for 
political office. The provincial legislation in 
question is really a re-enactment against 
trade unions in British Columbia of the 
former prohibition contained in the Domi- 
nion Elections Act and repealed in 1930. 
In Mr. Justice Judson's opinion, the control 
of political behaviour does not fall within 
the field of labour relations and is not 
within the provincial power, and secondly, 
the legislation under review is legislation 
in relation to federal elections, a field ex- 
clusively within the Dominion power. 

Mr. Justice Abbott, in his dissenting 
opinion, was in agreement with the reasons 
stated by Mr. Justice Judson. He held, inter 
alia, that under the Canadian constitution, 
any person or group of persons in Canada 
is entitled to promote the advancement of 
views on public questions by financial as 
well as by vocal or written means. It fol- 
lows that any individual, corporation, or 
voluntary association such as a trade union 
is entitled to contribute financially to sup- 
port any political activity not prohibited 
by law. 

Whatever power a provincial legislature 
may have to regulate expenditures for pro- 
vincial political activities, in Mr. Justice 
Abbott's opinion, it cannot legislate to regu- 
late or prohibit contributions made to 
assist in defraying the cost of federal politi- 
cal or electoral activities. Similarly, for the 
reasons which Mr. Justice Abbott expressed 
in the Switzman case, Parliament itself can- 
not legislate to regulate or prohibit financial 
contributions for provincial political or 
electoral purposes except to the extent that 
such regulation or prohibition is neces- 
sarily incidental to the exercise of its 
powers under Section 91 of the BNA Act. 

Further, Mr. Justice Abbott stated, the 
legislative purpose of subsection 6(c) of 
Section 9 of the British Columbia Labour 
Relations Act is clear and unambiguous. 
That purpose is to prohibit political con- 
tributions made directly or indirectly by 
one class of voluntary organization — a trade 
union — out of moneys received as a con- 
dition of membership, whether or not there 
is a check-off. Legislation of this character 
cannot be supported as being in relation 
to property and civil rights in the province 



within head 13 of Section 92 of the British 
North America Act, nor can it be said 
to be in relation to matters of a merely 
local or private nature in the province. 
Therefore, it is clearly ultra vires. 

Mr. Justice Cartwright also dissented 
from the majority decision and agreed with 
the conclusions reached by Mr. Justice 
Judson. He added, inter alia, that the legis- 
lation in question is an absolute and uncon- 
ditional prohibition of the contribution by 
a trade union to any political party or any 
candidate for political office of any moneys 
paid to the union as a condition of mem- 
bership. As the money so paid makes up 
practically the whole of the income of the 
union in question (and this applies, gen- 
erally speaking, to all trade unions in 
British Columbia), the effect of the im- 
pugned legislation is a virtually total pro- 
hibition of the expenditure by a trade union 
of any of its funds to further the interests 
of any poltical party or candidate in a 
federal election; this amounts to the pro- 
hibition of, inter alia, of political activity 
in the federal field, which, prior to the en- 
actment, was lawful in Canada. The pro- 
hibition, if valid, would be operative even 
if the forbidden contribution were approved 
and directed by a unanimous vote of all 
the members of the union concerned. Mr. 
Justice Cartwright was unable to accept 
the argument that this prohibition of a 
heretofore lawful and indeed normal poli- 
tical activity in regard to federal elections 
is ancillary, or necessarily incidental, to 
any of the provisions of the Labour Rela- 
tions Act which are within provincial power. 

The Supreme Court, by a majority deci- 
sion, dismissed the union's appeal and up- 
held the constitutional validity of Section 
9(6) of the Labour Relations Act Amend- 
ment Act 1961 as being intra vires of the 
Legislature of British Columbia. Oil, Chemi- 
cal and Atomic Workers International 
Union, Local 16-601 v. Imperial Oil Limited 
and the Attorney -General of British Colum- 
bia, (1963), 45 WWR, Part 1, p. 1. 

Ontario High Court . . . 

. . . hold employee may sue for vacation 

pay owed him under collective agreement 

On March 27, 1963, Chief Justice 
McRuer of the Ontario High Court, in dis- 
missing an application for certiorari to 
quash a judgment given on a claim for vaca- 
tion pay under a collective agreement, ruled 
that a collective agreement setting out the 
terms governing the employment relation- 
ship does not abrogate the common law 
relationship between the employer and 



46 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



employee and that the requirement for 
arbitration in Section 34(1) of the Labour 
Relations Act does not oblige an employee 
seeking payment of vacation pay to resort 
to arbitration to the exclusion of a court 
action. 

The employee was employed as a painter 
under a written contract, which provided 
that the employer would pay the employee 
an amount equal to four per cent (4%) of 
his wages as vacation pay. The employee 
alleged that he had received only $72.80, 
which was equal to two per cent (2%), and 
he claimed that another $72.80, another two 
per cent (2%), was owed to him. 

The employer disputed the claim and 
maintained that Section 34(1) of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act was "a com- 
plete bar to the action." Chief Justice 
McRuer stated that this was the only ques- 
tion with which he was concerned. Section 
34(1) reads as follows: 

34(1) Every collective agreement shall 
provide for the final and binding settlement 
by arbitration, without stoppage of work, of 
all differences between the parties arising from 
the interpretation, application, administration 
or alleged violation of the agreement, includ- 
ing any question as to whether a matter is 
arbitrable. 

The section further provides for insertion 
of such a clause in agreements where one 
does not already exist. 

The Chief Justice doubted his right to 
entertain the application, since the judge in 
the Court which rendered the decision had 
the sole jurisdiction to hear the claim and 
subsequently made his decision from which 
there is no appeal. However, he stated, an 
important question of law had been raised 
and, to his knowledge, for the first time in 
British jurisprudence. For these reasons, 
Chief Justice McRuer dealt with the ques- 
tion raised by counsel. 

It was argued that the provisions of Sec- 
tion 34(1) of the Act were broad enough 
to preclude a person employed under the 
terms of a collective agreement from bring- 
ing an action against his employer for his 
wages. It was further argued that in such 
cases the arbitration procedure set out in 
the collective agreement must be followed 
and, when the arbitration is completed, the 
claim against the employer is filed with the 
Registrar of the Supreme Court in accord- 
ance with Section 34(9) of the Act and 
then it has the same force and effect as a 
Court judgment. 

Chief Justice McRuer thought that if he 
adopted this argument, chaotic conditions 
would occur with reference to the simple 



matter of the prompt payment of em- 
ployees who operate under a collective bar- 
gaining agreement; and it would also put 
in the hands of a union that has been 
certified as a bargaining agent extraordinary 
power over non-members of the union who 
were employees of the same employer. The 
union, in such cases, could see fit to assert 
the claims of its members and not those of 
the non-members. He stated that it was not 
his belief that this broad meaning was the 
intention of the Legislature. 

The Chief Justice fortified his argument 
by turning to the Supreme Court of Canada 
decision of Mr. Justice Judson in Le 
Syndicat Catholique des Employes de Maga- 
sins de Quebec Inc. v. La Compagnie 
Paquet Ltee., (L.G. 1959, p. 286), in which 
the scope of a collective agreement is 
defined as follows: 

The union is, by virtue of its incorporation 
under the Professional Syndicates' Act and 
its certification under the Labour Relations 
Act, the representative of all the employees in 
the unit for the purpose of negotiating the 
labour agreement. . . . There is no room left 
for private negotiation between employer and 
employee. Certainly to the extent of the mat- 
ters covered by the collective agreement, free- 
dom of contract between master and in- 
dividual servant is abrogated. The collective 
agreement tells the employer on what terms 
he must in the future conduct his master and 
servant relations. When this collective agree- 
ment was made, it then became the duty of 
the employer to modify his contracts of em- 
ployment in accordance with its terms so far 
as the inclusion of those terms is authorized 
by the governing statutes. The terms of em- 
ployment are defined for all employees, and 
whether or not they are members of the 
union, they are identical for all. 

Chief Justice McRuer interpreted this to 
mean that "a collective agreement sets out 
the terms of employment that are to be 
effective between the employer and the 
employee but it does not abrogate the com- 
mon law relationship of employer and 
employee in the sense that the employer 
is required to pay his employee according 
to the terms laid down in the agreement and 
that the employee gives his work to the 
employer on those terms." The employer 
must pay promptly since the employee has 
a right of action against the employer for 
the wages due to him. 

The Chief Justice held that the lower 
Court's decision was correct in holding that 
the employee had a right to assert his claim 
in the courts and that the claim for wages 
for services rendered is not a matter 
required to be arbitrated. He therefore dis- 
missed the application. Re Grottoli v. Lock 
and Son Ltd. (1963), 39 D.L.R. (2d) 128. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



47 



Ontario High Court . . . 

. . . rules that tips given to a waitress are 
part of wages under Minimum Wage Act 

On April 5, 1963, Mr. Justice Landreville 
of the Ontario High Court, allowing an 
appeal by way of stated case from a convic- 
tion for a violation of the Ontario Mini- 
mum Wage Act, held that, since Section 
1(d) of the Act defines wages as including 
"every form of remuneration for labour 
performed," and, since it is not specified 
that they be paid or granted by the em- 
ployer, tips received by a waitress at the 
restaurant from her employer's customers 
are to be considered as wages and included 
in determining whether the employer has 
paid the required minimum wage. 

A magistrate for the City of Hamilton 
submitted the following question to the 
Ontario High Court: 

Was I wrong in holding that tips (monetary 
gratuities) received by the employee, Dorothy 
Leaver, during the course of her employment 
from patrons of the appellant Tavern and 
Restaurant, were not wages within the mean- 
ing of Section 1(d) of the said Minimum 
Wage Act. 

The waitress in question had been paid 
$22 a week, although the minimum required 
in that area was $30 a week. It was stated 
and not contradicted that the waitress 
received between $20-$ 30 a week in tips 
while on the job at the restaurant. 

Mr. Justice Landreville ruled that the 
relevant sections of the Minimum Wage 
Act, in addition to "the spirit and intention 
of the statute," were Section 1(d) and 
Section 6. Section 1(d) states that "wage" 
or "wages" includes every form of remu- 
neration for labour performed. Section 6 
states: 

Every employer who permits any employee 
to perform any work with respect to which a 
minimum wage is established shall be deemed 
to have agreed to pay to the employee at least 
the minimum wage established and the mini- 
mum wage shall be paid to the employee only 
by cash or by cheque payable at par at the 
place where the employee performed the 
work. 

Moreover, he stated that the Act neither 
defines nor refers expressly or impliedly to 
the term "tip". 

Mr. Justice Landreville stated that the 
Act was penal in nature, since it imposed an 
obligation on employers, and it therefore 
had to be strictly interpreted. He said that 
if the act complained of was expressly 
covered, or if the purpose of the statute 
prohibited such an act, then the person 
charged with committing the act was sub- 
ject to the provisions of the statute. 



Mr. Justice Landreville ruled that the 
Act did not deal with tips or gratuities. He 
said that he could not "strain the inter- 
pretation" of its provision to cover cases 
where the employee receives such income. 
On the contrary, he held that the definition 
of "wage" in Section 1(d) would lead one to 
believe that it included every form of 
remuneration. He commented that if the 
phrase "paid or granted by an employer" 
were included in that section it would have 
conclusively excluded tips received from 
third parties from the provisions of what 
constitutes a minimum wage. Therefore, 
he ruled that, since the phrase did not 
appear, there was "no clear cut wording" 
leading to the conclusion that tips must not 
be taken into consideration. 

Mr. Justice Landreville stated that he 
was not led to this conclusion merely 
because a bill was before the Legislature 
that would alter this interpretation.* The 
Act, he said, was designed to assure rea- 
sonable and livable wages for the area in 
which the employee lives. The word 
"remuneration" in S. 1(d) was synonymous 
to income, he held, and income can come 
from various sources. Moreover, he noted 
that tips were taxable under the federal 
Income Tax Act. 

In reply to the magistrate's question, Mr. 
Justice Landreville ruled the answer to be 
"yes". He set aside the magistrate's decision 
and ordered that a verdict of acquittal be 
entered for the employer. Regina v. Duffy's 
Tavern (Hamilton) Ltd, (1963), 39 D.L.R. 
(2d), 126. 

Ontario High Court . . . 

... on ground of reasonable likelihood of 
bias, bars Labour Relations Board member 

On April 10, 1963, Chief Justice McRuer 
of the Ontario High Court granted a pro- 
hibition to stop certification proceedings 
before the Ontario Labour Relations Board 
on the ground that a member of the Board 
representing the employees should have dis- 
qualified himself on the ground of rea- 
sonable likelihood of bias. 

The Court drew a distinction between 
membership in a trade union of a member 
of the Board representing the employees 
and the holding of an executive office in a 
central labour body by such a member. 
The Court held that, when a member of the 
Board is also the chief executive officer in 
a central labour body and, by virtue of 



* The Minimum Wage Amendment Act, 1962-63, 
amended clause (d) of Section 1 of the Minimum 
Wage Act, which now reads: "(d) 'wage' or 'wages' 
includes every form of remuneration for labour per- 
formed, but does not include 'tips' and other 
gratuities." 



48 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



this position is bound to promote the 
interests of the affiliated unions against 
outsiders, he should disqualify himself from 
sitting in a certification proceeding where 
there is a contest for bargaining rights 
between one of the affiliates of his organiza- 
tion and a union opposed by it. 

In December 1962, the Sudbury General 
Workers' Union, Local 101, Canadian 
Labour Congress, applied for certification 
as the bargaining agent for a unit of em- 
ployees at the I.G.A. Foodliner in Sudbury. 
The Sudbury and District General Workers' 
Union, Local 902 of the International Union 
of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, inter- 
vened and opposed the application. 

The Labour Relations Board advised the 
Mine-Mill local that a hearing to determine 
the allegations against the application was 
to be held on December 20, 1962. Counsel 
for the Mine-Mill union objected to one 
member of the Board hearing the applica- 
tion on the ground that he was biased. The 
Board member, who was the president of 
the Ontario Federation of Labour, an 
affiliate of the Canadian Labour Congress, 
refused to disqualify himself. Then the 
Mine-Mill local applied for prohibition to 
stop the certification proceedings. 

Dealing with the application, Chief Justice 
McRuer noted that the impugned member 
of the Board became a member in 1948 
and took the oath set out in Section 75(5) 
of the Ontario Labour Relations Act, which 
reads as follows: 

S. 75(5) I do solemnly swear that I will 
faithfully, truly and impartially, to the best 
of my judgment, skill and ability, execute and 
perform the office of member ... of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board and I will 
not, except in the discharge of my duties, 
disclose to any person any of the evidence or 
any other matter brought before the Board. 

Section 75(6) states that a quorum shall 
consist of the chairman, the vice-chairman, 
or a deputy vice-chairman, one member 
representative of employers and one repre- 
sentative of employees. 

The impugned member had been elected 
as president of the Ontario Federation of 
Labour in 1958. At that time, he swore to 
an oath contained in Section 6 of Article V 
of the Constitution, which states as fol- 
lows: 

... I make oath and say that I am not 
associated in any manner . . . with any group 
which expounds or promotes or encourages 
any doctrine or philosophy contrary to or 
subversive of the fundamental principles and 
institutions of the democratic form of govern- 
ment of Canada, and further, / make oath and 
say if elected I. will faithfully support the con- 
stitution, principles and policies of the Ontario 
Federation of Labour and the Canadian Labour 
Congress, [emphasis added.] 



The Constitution of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, which the Ontario Federation of 
Labour subscribes to, states its purposes 
in part, as follows: 

1. To support the principles of the Canadian 
Labour Congress. 

2. To promote the interests of its affiliates 
and generally to advance the economic and 
social welfare of the workers of Ontario. 

3. (a) To assist affiliated organizations in 
extending the benefits of mutual assistance and 
collective bargaining to workers. 

Local 101 of the General Workers' Union, 
the union applying for certification, is 
affiliated with the Ontario Federation of 
Labour and is a chartered local of the 
Canadian Labour Congress. 

Evidence indicated that a conflict existed 
between locals of the International Union 
of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers and 
locals of the Canadian Labour Congress. In 
1961, at the Ontario Federation of Labour's 
fifth annual Convention, over which the 
impugned member presided, a resolution 
was put forth offering support to the Cana- 
dian Labour Congress in its battle to destroy 
the "Communist-oriented leaders of Mine- 
Mill." 

Chief Justice McRuer stated that he was 
not concerned with the struggle between 
the respective labour organizations. He 
noted, however, that it was of utmost im- 
portance that persons exercising judicial or 
quasi-judicial functions should act in 
accordance with the law. 

The Chief Justice went on to point out 
that, although Section 75(2) of the Act 
required as Board appointees an equal 
number of representatives of employers 
and employees, the Board members did not 
represent either employers or employees. 
He quoted from the judgment of Mr. 
Justice Roach in Re Ontario Labour Rela- 
tions Board, Bradley et al. v. Can. Gen' I 
Electric Co. (L.G. 1957, p. 860), as fol- 
lows: 

... As members of the Board they are 
independent of both (employers and em- 
ployees). They occupy a quasi-judicial position 
and in the discharge of their duties they must 
act judicially. Sitting in between them is an 
equally independent chairman. The present 
incumbent of that position has never been 
affiliated with either management or labour 
but it would be quite Wrong to say that on 
that account he is more independent than his 
fellow members . . . because as between all 
the members there can be no gradations of 
independence. 

Chief Justice McRuer reviewed .the 
authorities and ruled that the Board mem- 
bers exercise quasi-judicial functions in 
determining certification matters and that, 
if a Board member is shown to be biased, 
the Board decision may be quashed on 
certiorari. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



49 



With regard to the question of "real or 
reasonable likelihood of bias," the Chief 
Justice considered a number of judicial prec- 
edents and concluded that it would be 
wrong for a person to act if there was a 
real likelihood of bias in favour of one of 
the parties; that if a person who is required 
to act judicially (or quasi-judicially) has a 
pecuniary interest in the matter in dispute, 
no matter how small, bias is presumed even 
in cases where the tribunal has in fact acted 
impartially; and that there was another 
class of case in which the objection is not 
founded on any pecuniary interest but would 
be in the nature of a challenge to favour 
and that in such cases the question to be 
answered is what are the facts of the 
case. He thought that question was the one 
to be determined in the case at bar. He 
stated, however, that it was not necessary, 
in answering the question, to decide whether 
bias had in fact existed. 

Moreover, he noted that the authorities 
pointed out that it was difficult to deter- 
mine the existence of bias as a matter of 
fact. Lord O'Brien in The King (De Vesci) 
v. Justices of Queens County, [1908] 2 Ir. 
R. 285, stated: 

We rarely, if ever, could ascertain the actual 
condition at a given moment of the human 
mind. All we are concerned with in such a 
case as the one now before us is, whether there 
was, at the outset of the inquiry, a real like- 
lihood of bias; whether, under all the cir- 
cumstances, there were reasonable grounds 
for believing that any one of the adjudicating 
magistrates would be, even unconsciously to 
himself, influenced by bias. By "bias" I under- 
stand a real likelihood of an operative prej- 
udice, whether conscious or unconscious. 

Chief Justice McRuer stated that the 
weight of the authorities established "rea- 
sonable likelihood of bias" as the correct 
test. He ruled that "real likelihood of bias" 
of the impugned member was not to be 
determined by an analysis of his mind or 
character but by an objective consideration 
of whether a reasonable man under the 
circumstances might suppose that there 
would be an improper interference, con- 
scious or unconscious, with the course of 
justice if he sat. 

The Chief Justice noted that when the 
impugned member was nominated as the 
president and chief executive officer of 
the Ontario Federation of Labour, he 
obligated himself to "faithfully support the 
constitution, principles and policies" of the 
Federation. He would have to promote 
the interests of Canadian Labour Congress 
affiliates, such as the General Workers' 
Local 101, as well. The Federation resolu- 
tion made it a fixed policy to destroy the 
Mine-Mill union as a bargaining agent and 
that policy would have involved Local 902, 
if carried out. 



The Mine-Mill intervention contesting 
the General Workers' certification applica- 
tion placed the impugned member of the 
Board in the position of sitting in judgment 
on an issue in dispute between the two 
unions. His decision could advance or 
retard the declared policy of the Federa- 
tion. The Board member's oath required 
him to be impartial and his Federation oath 
required him, as chief executive and presi- 
dent, to carry out the Federation policies. 
Chief Justice McRuer ruled that it was 
"asking too much of human nature to hold 
that the chief executive of an organization 
which had announced a declared policy of 
destroying another organization should sit 
to decide disputes between the two organ- 
izations or their constituent affiliates." 

It was argued that Section 75(2) of the 
Labour Relations Act gave the impugned 
member a statutory right to act even in 
cases where bias might be inferred. More- 
over, it was argued that every trade union 
member has an interest in advancing the 
policies of his union and its affiliates and 
that, if the law was applied strictly, trade 
union members would be barred from 
sitting as Board members on every dispute 
between a union and an employer. 

The Chief Justice ruled that the Legisla- 
ture contemplated employees' representa- 
tives on the Board would be trade union 
members. Mere membership in a trade 
union affiliated with the Federation, he 
stated, would not warrant disqualification of 
the impugned member. The authorities 
demonstrate a distinction between mere 
membership and an executive responsibility 
to carry out the declared policies of a 
body. 

Chief Justice McRuer went on to say: 

A man might well be a member of a trade 
union and be free to act with respect to mat- 
ters before the Board affecting another trade 
union. It is ... a different thing where a 
member of a board has a dual responsibility, 
on the one hand to carry out the declared 
policies of the . . . Federation . . .and on the 
other hand to decide impartially any matters 
that may be in conflict with those policies. I do 
not think on any recognized principle of law 
applicable to judicial or quasi-judicial tribunals 
one who has clearly divided loyalties as in this 
case can be permitted to act. 

The Chief Justice made it clear that he 
did not make any suggestion of mala fides 
(bad faith) on the part of the impugned 
member. He felt quite confident that, if the 
matter had been presented to him at the 
time the objection was taken in the light 
of the present reasons for judgment, he 
would have disqualified himself and per- 
mitted another member of the Board to sit 
who did not have the same responsibilities 
and obligations in the Ontario Federation 



50 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



of Labour that he had undertaken. The 
application for prohibition was granted. 
Regina v. Ontario Labour Relations 
Board; Ex parte Hall, (1963), 39 D.L.R. 
(2d), Part 2, p. 113. 

Ontario High Court . . . 

. . . enjoins uncertified union's peaceful 
picketing in disregard of Act's procedure 

On June 7, 1963, Mr. Justice Landreville 
of the Ontario High Court, delivering writ- 
ten reasons for the injunction order he 
granted on June 5, ruled that peaceful 
picketing conducted by an uncertified 
union can be enjoined where it occurs in 
disregard of the procedures set out in the 
Labour Relations Act. 

Edland Construction (1960) Ltd. was 
engaged in construction of a warehouse in 
Niagara Falls. On May 27 and 28, 1963, a 
picket line was formed by a dozen men 
who apparently were not employees of the 
company in question and were led by 
the business agent of the International 
Association of Bridge, Structural and 
Ornamental Iron Workers, Local 736. 

There was no labour dispute between the 
company and its employees and there was 
no relationship between the company and 
the picketing union. No trade union was 
certified as a bargaining agent for any of 
the company's employees in Niagara Falls 
and no application for certification was made 
to the Labour Relations Board. Apparently 
the purpose of picketing was through 
intimidation either to compel the employees 
to "sign up" or to impose on the employer 
a collective agreement. 

In the opinion of Mr. Justice Landreville, 
it was a case of clear interference with the 
private rights of labourers and employers. 
Further, he stated that, although there may 
be a common law right to communicate 
peacefully information by placard-bearing 
men on a picket line, that right must be 
cautiously exercised; for, if through that 
conduct there can be drawn any inference 
of intimidation or threats, or any inter- 
ference with the acts of employees or the 
movement of merchandise and vehicles of 
the employer, such picketing constitutes the 



offence of watching and besetting, and 
further, it constitutes a conspiracy and a 
nuisance. Such picketing is designed to force 
a union contract on two groups by other 
than peaceful persuasive methods. Picketing, 
being lawful as a means of communicat- 
ing information, ceases to have a char- 
acter of righteousness when it acquires a 
character of invectiveness and interference 
in the rights of citizens to carry on their 
business. 

Mr. Justice Landreville noted that, in 
Smith Bros. Construction Co. v. Jones (L.G. 
1955, p. 678), Mr. Justice McLennan, 
referring to peaceful information picketing, 
stated that "if the development of the trade 
union movement has reached the point 
where workers will not cross a picket line 
to go to work, that is just as effective an 
interference with contractual relations as 
any other form of restraint might be. 
Loyalty to the rule . . . having been 
developed, the rule should not be abused 
for a wrongful purpose and where there is 
no justification." 

That rule of loyalty to the picket line, 
Mr. Justice Landreville added, has now 
stretched out to the members of the public. 
Then, picketing ceases to mean communica- 
tion of information and becomes a measure, 
to a varying degree, to a course of watch- 
ing, besetting and intimidating others. It 
ceases to have a character of peacefulness 
when it aims at causing such nuisance and 
damages to the other as to force him into 
submission. 

Mr. Justice Landreville concluded that 
picketing, even if it is peaceful, can be 
enjoinable where it occurs before the re- 
quired resort is taken to the steps set out in 
the Labour Relations Act. The Act pro- 
pounds the procedure to be followed, and 
to take the course indicated in the Act is 
not only a right but becomes an obligation. 
To act outside of the provisions of the Act 
to achieve a like end becomes a prohibition 
and is illegal. The injunction order against 
picketing was issued until the trial. Edland 
Construction (1960) Ltd. v. Chi Ids and 
Sallafranque, (1963) 39 D.L.R. (2d), 
Part 7, p. 536. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



51 



Recent Regulations, Federal and Provincial 

British Columbia issues three new minimum wage orders. New 
Brunswick issues rules for hairdressing and barbering schools 



The federal Government issued the Older 
Worker Employment and Training Incentive 
Program Regulations and amended the Pre- 
vailing Rate Employees General Regula- 
tions, 1963. 

In British Columbia, a new male mini- 
mum wage order for the machinist, 
moulder, refrigeration and sheet-metal 
trades established a minimum wage of $2 
an hour for journeymen. Two other new 
orders, applicable to both men and women, 
set a minimum wage of $1 an hour for 
elevator operators and starters and for jani- 
tors and resident janitors in apartment 
buildings, with provision for lower rates 
during the first three months of employ- 
ment. 

In New Brunswick, rules for hairdressing 
and barbering schools were issued under 
the Trade Schools Act. 

FEDERAL 

Appropriation Acts 

The Older Worker Employment and 
Training Incentive Program Regulations 
(SOR/63-439) were gazetted on Novem- 
ber 27. These regulations set out the condi- 
tions under which the federal Government 
will pay a monthly incentive to employers 
who hire certain eligible older workers 
between November 1, 1963 and January 
31, 1964. 

These regulations were reviewed on the 
Older Workers page of the December issue, 
page 1102. 

Financial Administration Act 

Amendments to the Prevailing Rate Em- 
ployees General Regulations, 1963, dealing 
with reporting pay and leave of absence 
with pay were gazetted as SOR/63-429 on 
November 13. 

A new section on reporting pay has been 
added. It provides that, where a prevailing 
rate employee has reported to work his 
normal working hours or a scheduled over- 
time shift and the deputy head has certi- 
fied that no work is available for him, he 
must now be paid two hours pay at the 
applicable normal or overtime rate, as the 
case may be. 

Another new provision gives the deputy 
head discretionary power to grant leave of 
absence with pay to an employee who is 
called as a witness before an Appeal Board 
established by the Civil Service Commission 
or who is acting as the representative of 
the appellant before such a Board. 



PROVINCIAL f 

B.C. Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts 

The British Columbia Board of Industrial 
Relations recently issued three new mini- 
mum wage orders. The first established a 
minimum wage of $2 an hour for men in 
the machinist, moulder, refrigeration and 
sheetmetal trades. The second order, which 
is applicable to both men and women, in- 
creased the minimum wage of elevator 
operators and starters from 75 cents to $1 
an hour. The third order, which also 
covers both male and female employees, 
set a minimum wage of $1 an hour for 
janitors, including resident janitors in apart- 
ment buildings. 

Machinist, Moulder, Refrigeration and 
Sheet-metal Trades. The new order for the 
machinist, moulder, refrigeration and sheet- 
metal trades (B.C. Reg. 179/63, gazetted 
October 31) replaces three orders that set 
a minimum of $1.25 an hour for employees 
in the machinist and refrigeration trades 
and a minimum of $1.50 an hour for 
sheetmetal workers. Previously no mini- 
mum wage was fixed for moulders. 

The $2-an-hour rate set by this order 
applies to all journeymen in these trades 
except persons permanently employed at 
maintenance work, employees engaged in 
the production-line or assembly-line manu- 
facture of metal products for resale, and 
persons acting in a supervisory, managerial 
or confidential capacity who are exempt 
from the Hours of Work Act. In line with 
the usual practice, an exception is also made 
for an apprentice, part-time or handicapped 
employee with a special permit from the 
Board to work for less than the minimum 
wage. Such an employee must be paid at 
the rate specified in the permit. 

A new feature of the order is that time 
and one-half the regular rate is now pay- 
able after 40 hours in a week instead of 
after 44 hours. If, by agreement, hours are 
averaged over a fixed period, the overtime 
rate must be paid for all hours worked in 
excess of a weekly average of 40 hours. As 
before, this premium rate is also payable 
for all hours worked in excess of eight 
in the day. 

The daily guarantee provision is similar 
to that in most British Columbia minimum 
wage orders. Every employee must receive 
at least two hours pay at the regular rate if 
he reports for work in response to a call 



52 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



from the employer and four hours if he 
commences work, subject to the usual 
qualifications. 

Hours are limited to 8 in the day and 44 
in the week, subject to the exceptions pro- 
vided in the Hours of Work Act, but there 
is no provision for a weekly rest. 

Elevator Operators and Starters. Like the 
majority of orders issued in British Colum- 
bia within the past year, the revised order 
for elevator operators and starters sets a 
regular minimum of $1 an hour, with pro- 
vision for lower minima during the first 
three months of employment. During the 
first month of employment, the minimum is 
85 cents an hour, increasing to 90 cents the 
second month and to 95 cents the third. As 
in other recent orders, a month's employ- 
ment is defined as 22 working shifts. 

Time and one-half the regular rate must 
now be paid after 40 hours in a week in- 
stead of after 44, and, as before, after 8 
hours in a day. This brings the overtime 
requirement into line with the standard 
set in the majority of orders issued during 
the past year. 

The daily guarantee provision, which 
is unchanged, is the same as that in the 
order for the machinist, moulder, refrigera- 
tion and sheetmetal trades described above. 

The order again requires elevator opera- 
tors and starters to be given a weekly rest 
of 32 consecutive hours, with provision for 
exceptions with the approval of the Board. 

The revised order again gives the Board 
discretionary power to require an employer 
to furnish the elevator operator or starter 
with a seat or chair while on duty if it con- 
siders it necessary for the welfare of the 
employee. 

The prohibition against an employer's 
requiring an elevator operator or starter to 
partake of meals or make use of lodgings 
as a condition of employment is continued. 
If the employee agrees to accept meals or 
use the lodgings provided by the employer 
however, the Board, as before, may regulate 
the charges if it thinks that the employer is 
charging too much for the type of services 
provided. 

Janitors. The new order for janitors 
(B.C. Reg. 196/63, gazetted November 28) 
differs from the former order in that it sets 
the same minimum wage, $1 an hour, for 
resident janitors in apartment buildings as 
for janitors employed in other types of 
buildings. The previous order set an hourly 
minimum of 75 cents for janitors in build- 
ings other than apartments and for resident 
janitors in apartments with four suites or 
less, and minimum monthly rates ranging 
from $50 to $265 for resident janitors in 
larger apartment buildings. 



Another new feature is that, in line with 
recent practice, lower minimum rates are 
now set for janitors with less than three 
months experience. The minimum is 85 
cents an hour during the first month of 
employment, 90 cents the second month and 
95 cents the third. 

Time and one-half the regular rate must 
be paid for all hours worked in excess of 
8 in the day and 44 in the week, with the 
usual exception where hours are averaged 
over a fixed period. This provision represents 
a change for resident janitors; the previous 
order did not set overtime rates for these 
employees. 

The order contains the usual daily guar- 
antee provision but, as before, it applies 
only to persons employed by an employer 
whose sole or principal business is that of 
providing janitor service. 

The policy with respect to charges for 
accommodation has been changed. An em- 
ployer is now forbidden to make any charge 
for the accommodation provided for the 
resident janitor in an apartment building 
containing more than 10 suites.* In smaller 
apartment houses, the maximum charge is 
$50 a month. The Board has authority to 
order adjustments in the rates charged if 
it considers the accommodation is unsuit- 
able or the charges unreasonable. Previous- 
ly there was no provision for free accom- 
modation nor any limitation on charges 
but the Board was empowered to regulate 
charges if it considered it necessary. 

The maximum charge for gas or elec- 
tricity remains $4 a month unless a meter is 
installed, in which case the resident janitor 
will be charged according to the amount 
used. 

Hours of janitors and resident janitors 
are limited to 8 in the day and 44 in the 
week, with provision for variations by 
agreement between the employer and the 
employee and for extended hours in 
emergencies, subject to the approval of the 
Board. 

If a janitor is working on a split shift, 
his hours must be confined within 12 hours 
immediately following commencement of 
work. 

The provision requiring employees to be 
given a weekly rest of 32 consecutive hours, 
which previously applied only to janitors, 
now applies to resident janitors as well. 
The previous order provided for a weekly 
rest of 24 hours for resident janitors in 
buildings with 20 or more suites, and of 
12 hours for those in apartments with 12 



* The suite occupied by the janitor is not to be 
counted when computing the number of suites. 

{Continued on page 62) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



53 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Claimants for unemployment insurance benefit number 218,900 
on October 31, a total 17 per cent higher than at previous 
month-end but 10 per cent lower than the year-earlier figure 



Claimants for unemployment insurance 
benefit numbered 218,900 on October 31.* 
This was 17 per cent more than the total 
of 186,300 on September 30 but 10 per cent 
less than the figure of 244,100 on October 
31, 1962. 

Males made up most of the increase from 
the previous month and of the decrease from 
the previous year, amounting to 81 and 86 
per cent respectively. 

Of the male claimants on October 31, 
the proportion on claim for from one to 
four weeks was 57 per cent, compared with 
50 per cent in the previous month. This in- 
creased percentage reflects the preponder- 
ance of males among the new applicants. 
Of the total number of males, 11 per cent 
had been on claim for 14 to 26 weeks, com- 
pared with 14 per cent in the previous 
month. 

Initial and renewal claims filed during 
October numbered 126,200, an increase of 
some 33,000, or nearly 36 per cent, com- 
pared with total of 92,900 in September. 
The October total, however, was 16 per 
cent below the total of 150,400 in October 
1962. 

Beneficiaries and Benefit Payments 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries in October was estimated at 148,- 
800, compared with 133,000 in September 
and 152,900 in October 1962. 

Payments during the month totalled 
$14,000,000, compared with $12,500,000 
in September and $15,800,000 in October 
1962. 

The average weekly payment per person 
was $23.51 in October, $23.54 in September, 
and $23.42 in October 1962. 



Insurance Registrations 

On October 31, insurance books or con- 
tribution cards had been issued to 4,834,660 
employees who had contributed to the Un- 
employment Insurance Fund at one time or 
another since April 1, 1963. 

On the same date, registered employers 
numbered 338,085, a decrease of 17 since 
September 30. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During October, 12,101 investigations 
were conducted by enforcement officers 
across Canada. Of these 7,302 were spot 
checks of postal and counter claims to 
verify the fulfilment of statutory conditions, 
and 367 were miscellaneous investigations. 
The remaining 4,432 were investigations in 
connection with claimants suspected of mak- 
ing false statements to obtain benefits. 

Prosecutions were begun in 269 cases, 
125 against employers and 144 against 
claimants.* 

Punitive disqualifications as a result of 
false statements or misrepresentations by 
claimants numbered 1,741.* 

Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received by the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund in October totalled $30,963,- 
087.46, compared with $29,718,170.57 in 
September and $30,065,935.05 in October 
1962. 

Benefits paid in October totalled $13,- 
989,451.92, compared with $12,527,626.72 
in September and $15,753,718.61 in October 
1962. 

The balance of the Fund on October 31 
was $41,265,044.22; on September 30 it was 
$24,291,408.68 and on October 31, 1962 it 
was $89,928,587.38. 



*See Tables E-l to E-4, pages 83-85. 



* These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



In a comparison of current unemployment insurance statistics with those for a 
previous period, consideration should be given to relevant factors other than numbers, 
such as the opening and closing of seasonal industries, increase in area population, 
influence of weather conditions, and the general employment situation. Claimants should 
not be interpreted either as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total job applicants." 

A claimant's unemployment register is placed in the "live file" at the local office as 
soon as the claim is made. As a result, the count of claimants at any given time inevitably 
includes some whose claims are in process. 



54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 






Monthly Report on Placement Operations of the NES 



During November 1963, the National 
Employment Service placed 100,300 persons 
in employment. Some 73,100, or 72.9 per 
cent, of these were men and 27,200, or 27.1 
per cent, were women. 

The cumulative total of placements for 
the 11 months ended in November was 
1,073,300, comprising 724,500 placements 
of men and 348,800 placements of women. 
For both November and the 11 months, 
placement totals were between those of 1961 
and 1962. 

Some 3,800, or 3.8 per cent, of Novem- 
ber's placements involved the movement of 
workers from one area to another; during 
the 11 -month period, such transfers, 59,600 
in all, accounted for 5.6 per cent of the 
placements effected. 

The regional distribution of placements 
in November and in the 11 months was: 







Eleven Months 


Region 


November 


Ended November 


Atlantic 


6,900 


75,700 


Quebec 


39,500 


309,000 


Ontario 


31,900 


374,200 


Prairie 


14,100 


184,300 


Pacific 


7,900 


130,100 



Vacancies notified by employers to na- 
tional employment offices during November 
followed the same general pattern as place- 
ments. Vacancies for men numbered 90,300, 
or 69.6 per cent of the total of 129,700. 

For the 11 months ended in November, 
vacancies reached a total of 1,339,000, of 
which 870,300 (65.0 per cent) were male 
vacancies and 468,700 (35.0 per cent) were 
female. 

As in placements, vacancies notified dur- 
ing November and during the 11-month 
period reached a point between the totals 
of 1961 and 1962. 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB 2262, Nov. 6, 1963 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, married, filed an initial application for 
benefit at a local office of the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission on May 4, 
1962, and was registered for employment as 
a bookkeeping machine operator. She had 
worked for the same employer from July 
9, 1951 to March 2, 1962, when she 
voluntarily left because of pregnancy. Her 
rate of pay had been $307 a month. 

Her child was born on April 1, 1962, 
and as arrangements for the care of the 
child in the event that she was offered em- 
ployment had not been confirmed, the in- 
surance officer disqualified her from receipt 
of benefit commencing April 29, 1962. The 
disqualification was terminated, however, on 
May 19, 1962, and the claim was allowed. 

As a result of an investigation, the claim- 
ant made the following Statutory Declara- 
tion to the Commission dated August 30, 
1962: 

I, ... do solemnly declare that: ... I last 
earned $307 a month as a bookkeeping 
machine operator. I quit 2 March 1962 
because of pregnancy — my first boy [was] born 
1 April 1962, claim filed 4 May 1962 .. . Mrs. 
X, who is unemployed and not a UIC claimant, 
is my baby sitter ... I have had no employment, 
earnings or vacation while on claim. I am 
capable and available for full-time work in Z— 
... I am not willing to work for less than 
$280 a month. I have made no applications for 
work . . . 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



And I make this solemn declaration con- 
scientiously believing it to be true, and know- 
ing that it is of the same force and effect as if 
made under oath, and by virtue of the Canada 
Evidence Act. 

The local office commented that the 
prevailing rates in the area were $40 to $60 
a week and referred the claim to the insur- 
ance officer for adjudication. 

The insurance officer disqualified the 
claimant and suspended benefit from Sep- 
tember 2, on the ground that she had failed 
to provide she was available for work, as 
required by Section 54(2) (a) of the Act, 
as she was unduly restricting the wages she 
was willing to accept. The insurance officer 
notified the claimant of the disqualification 
in a letter dated September 18. 

The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees in a letter, which was received in 
the local office on September 25. The letter 
reads : 

. . . Your officer was in to see me and he 
asked me what wages I would accept; usually 
everyone quotes high but accepts less. Not ever 
having been on unemployment insurance before 
or knowing bookkeeping machine operator 
wages — naturally a person would quote nearer 
[her] former wages. Why do you people ask 
what wages we would accept when you know 
the salary wages in Z — ; after all, who should 
know better than you people. If you work in 
one office for 11 years you don't know what 
other businesses are paying. You put the ques- 
tion to us and if we answer wrong you cut 
our benefits. I don't think you are being fair. 



55 



In the meantime, I have been watching the 
want-ads and have visited a few places . . . 
but had no luck — I will continue looking . . . 

On receipt of the appeal, the local office 
wrote to the claimant on September 28, 
asking her to state the minimum salary she 
would consider acceptable in regard to any 
employment. Her reply, dated October 1, 
reads: 

Regarding your letter dated September 28, 
1962,^ the minimum salary I would consider 
acceptable is $250 per month. Hoping this 
salary is close to bookkeeping machine 
operators in Z — ■ . . . 

In the Submission to Board of Referees 
dated October 9, the insurance officer said: 

The insurance officer gave very little weight 
to this last statement by the claimant as it 
was made after she had been disqualified. She 
had been unemployed since March 1962 and 
had shown no effort of her own to obtain 
employment. In his opinion her intentions and 
attitude toward employment showed a complete 
lack of interest in returning to the labour mar- 
ket and he, therefore, effected no change in 
his decision. 

The unanimous decision of the board of 
referees, which heard the case on October 
23, 1962, reads: 

The claimant was present at the hearing, and 
complained to the board that when asked what 
wages she would accept for work, it was only 
a natural reaction of a party so asked that the 
figure quoted would be as close as possible to 
the wages formerly received by her. The claim- 
ant admitted receiving the UIC 501 D booklet 
at the time of registering for benefits, and in- 
dicated that she had read some but not all of 
it. 

Apart from the positive statement of the 
claimant on 30 August 1962 that she would 
not work for less than $280 per month, the 
claimant also indicated that she had made no 
applications for work as of the time the said 
statement was given. 

She has apparently made applications for 
work since that time, but when asked whether 
she would be willing to accept work in a de- 
partment store as a sales clerk at a wage of 
approximately $35 to $40 per week, the claim- 
ant indicated that she did not see why she 
should be expected to take a position such as 
a sales clerk for a salary of that amount. This 
statement was made by the claimant notwith- 
standing that she has been unemployed for a 
considerable period of time, and that there 
have apparently been no available positions in 
her own line of work obtainable through either 
the [UIC] office or through her own efforts. 

. . . The claimant has accordingly failed to 
prove her availability for work on 2 September 
1962, and subsequently. 

. . . The appeal of the claimant is dismissed 
and the decision of the insurance officer is up- 
held. 

The claimant applied to the chairman of 
the board of referees for leave to appeal 
to the Umpire and in that connection, her 
lawyers, in a document dated November 2, 
1962, stated: 

... It is respectfully submitted that the facts 
of the subject case raise serious and profound 



issues relative to the proper interpretation of 
Section 54(2) (a) of the Unemployment In- 
surance Act, and, as well as to the type of 
evidence upon which the board of referees may 
properly affirm a disqualification decision of 
an insurance officer. The relevant evidence 
before the board may be summarized as fol- 
lows: 

The claimant swore a Statutory Declaration 
on the 30th day of August 1962 ... It is to be 
emphasized that the applicant swore this 
Declaration at the request of an officer of the 
[UIC] and that the statements set forth in the 
said Declaration do not present all the con- 
versation which took place between the unem- 
ployment insurance officer and the applicant. 

The applicant made it abundantly clear at 
the time that she had been following local 
newspapers for a possible position in the 
category of work in which she was skilled, but 
had not found any such positions advertised 
up to the date of the Declaration. In other 
words, she had taken steps prior to August 30, 
1962 to seek out employment as a bookkeep- 
ing machine operator through the want-ads of 
the local papers, but had been unsuccessful 
in this regard. 

As regards her statement to the effect that 
she would not be willing to work for less than 
$280 per month, it is to be emphasized that 
this statement was made in response to ques- 
tions from the aforesaid unemployment in- 
surance officer and it is only reasonable for a 
person who has been earning up to $307 per 
month in a reasonably skilled position to hope 
for future employment at approximately the 
same wage scale. 

Reviewing the sequence of events up to the 
second day of September 1962, it is obvious 
that the insurance officer who effected the 
order for disqualification of the applicant 
placed great reliance on the Statutory Declara- 
tion sworn on the 30th day of August. In 
other words, the disqualification arose not 
through the lack of co-operation or indifference 
to seeking out job opportunities, but rather 
through her response to a question put to her 
by the unemployment insurance officer as to 
what wage rate she was seeking. 

The applicant would refer to the submission 
made to the board of referees by the insurance 
officer and especially page 2 of the said sub- 
mission, where the insurance officer points out 
that prevailing rates in the Z — area ranged 
from $40 to $60 per week for workers in the 
[type] of employment in which the applicant 
was skilled. 

It is to be emphasized that at no time was 
the applicant advised of prevailing rates and, 
accordingly, could have no knowledge that her 
requested wage rate of $2-80 per month was 
out of line with current prevailing wage rates 
in that area. 

In the statement of facts set forth in the 
decision of the board of referees, the learned 
members of the board appear to lay great 
weight upon a statement made by the applicant 
to the board to the effect that she did not 
see why she should be expected to take a posi- 
tion such as a sales clerk's for a salary 
approximating $35 to $40 per week. The ap- 
plicant respectfully submits that her statements 
to that effect should have no bearing on a 
determination of her availability to work on 
September 2nd, 1962, and subsequently. It is 
respectfully submitted that the disqualification 
order of September 2nd, 1962, was based and, 
in fact, could only be based upon the evidence 
set forth in the applicant's Statutory Declara- 
tion of August 30th, 1962, and that the evid- 



56 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






ence set forth in the said Statutory Declara- 
tion was not a proper basis upon which the 
insurance officer and the board of referees 
could find the applicant was unavailable for 
work on September 2 and subsequently. 

It is respectfully submitted that it was not 
unreasonable for the applicant to hope to 
gain employment at $280 per month at that 
time and that if officers of the [UIC] thought 
that her request for such a salary was unrea- 
sonable, they should have communicated that 
fact to her in the clearest terms before dis- 
qualifying her. 

It is obvious from all the evidence in this 
case that the insurance officer used the 
applicant's Declaration, and especially her 
statements therein regarding the wage rate she 
was seeking, as an excuse for disqualifying her. 
In this regard it is to be emphasized that the 
applicant was not warned or cautioned at the 
time she made this Declaration that she would 
be bound by it and that it would be used as a 
basis for disqualification in the event that she 
did not reduce her wage rate demand below 
the $280 figure set forth therein. ' 

The applicant reiterates that serious issues 
are raised by the unusual nature of the evidence 
upon which the insurance officer and the 
learned members of the board have founded 
their decisions and, accordingly, respectfully 
applies for leave to appeal the decision of the 
board of referees herein . . . 

Leave to appeal to the Umpire was 
granted to the claimant by the chairman of 
the board of referees, who said: 

I cannot agree with the submissions in the 
claimant's application for leave to appeal that 
question the right of the board of referees to 
attach weight to statements made by the claim- 
ant at the hearing. . . However, this claimant 
is only one of several claimants who have ap- 
peared before this chairman in recent months, 
complaining of the manner in which they were 
questioned on the wages which they were will- 
ing to accept . . . 

Several such persons have indicated that 
there is no possible way for them to know 
what the prevailing rates for positions are in 
this area and, accordingly, to know whether 
their own suggested wage rate is out of line 
with the current prevailing wage rates in that 
area. When asked what wages they were willing 
to accept they stated that it was only natural 
to request a wage approximately their former 
salary. 

Accordingly, I am consenting to the claim- 
ant's application for leave to appeal to the 
Umpire, since I feel that a principle is involved 
here which requires clarification and comment 
through the medium of an Umpire's decision 
... it would [also] be appreciated if the 
Umpire would comment on or answer the fol- 
lowing questions : 

1. Should a claimant be advised what the 
prevailing rates are in an area before being 
asked what salary he or she is willing to 
accept? 

2. Was this claimant prejudiced in the mak- 
in of her claim in not being advised of 
the prevailing rate before being asked to 
state her required wage? 

The [claimant's] law firm, in a document 
dated July 18, 1963, submitted a statement 
of observations for consideration by the 



Umpire and a request for an oral hearing 
of the appeal. The document reads: 

The appellant . . . requests that a hearing 
be granted for this appeal so that she may be 
given the opportunity to present viva voce 
evidence with respect to the matter under 
appeal. 

The appellant points out that a formal 
application for leave to appeal from the deci- 
sion of the board of referees herein was sub- 
mitted on her behalf on November 2nd, 1962, 
and . . . presented the facts in issue and the 
grounds of appeal. 

The appellant concedes that a formal appeal 
was not submitted in exact accordance with 
Section 75 of the Unemployment Insurance 
Act, but would point out that the application 
for leave to appeal contained all of the basic 
facts and information upon which the appeal 
would be argued. In this regard the appellant 
adopts the points raised by [the] chairman of 
the board of referees in his consent order under 
which he approves the appellant's application 
for leave to appeal to the Umpire. 

The appellant respectfully submits that there 
are serious substantive issues raised in the in- 
stant case which should be adjudicated upon 
by the Umpire, and respectfully requests that 
a formal hearing be granted so that viva voce 
evidence may be given by the appellant as to 
the issues under appeal. . . 

The case was heard in Z — on September 
26, 1963. The claimant, who was present, 
was represented by her solicitor, and the 
Commission by one of its solicitors. 

Considerations and Conclusions: The only 
ground on which the claimant was dis- 
qualified by the insurance officer is that she 
had failed to prove that she was available 
for work from September 2, 1962, in that 
she had unduly restricted the wages she was 
willing to accept when she stated on 
August 30, 1962, "I am not willing to work 
for less than $280 a month." 

In her appeal to a board of referees on 
September 25, 1962, the claimant contended, 
in effect, that her statement had not been 
accurately transcribed by the interviewing 
officer and that she had been prejudiced in 
not being informed of the prevailing rates of 
pay before being asked to state what salary 
she was willing to accept. 

In a decision dated June 14, 1963, 
namely, CUB 2178, which dealt with a 
similar case, the Umpire decided to allow 
the appeal because the terms of the ques- 
tions which had been put to a claimant had 
not been recorded in the declaration she 
had signed, and also because no information 
appeared to have been given to that claim- 
ant regarding the prevailing rates of pay 
and the law applicable in her case before 
being questioned by the interviewing officer. 

The reason behind the aforementioned 
decision, and this remark seems to apply in 
the instant case, is that a claimant, as a 
general rule, does not know and is not 

(Continued on page 23) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



57 



WAGE SCHEDULES 

Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during November 

Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During November the Department of Labour prepared 183 wage schedules for 
inclusion in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Govern- 
ment and its Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, 
remodelling, repair or demolition, and certain services. In the same period, a total of 140 
contracts in these categories was awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. 

In addition, 195 contracts not listed in this report and which contained the General 
Fair Wages Clause were awarded by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Defence 
Construction (1951) Limited and the Departments of Defence Production, Northern 
Affairs and National Resources, Post Office, Public Works and Transport. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under this heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in November for the manufacture of supplies and equipment were 
as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 1 $21,000.00 

Defence Production 161 979,410.00 

Post Office 4 51,437.50 

Public Works 1 9,346.00 

Transport 4 12,581.80 

(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour legislation of the federal Government has the 
purpose of insuring that all Government contracts for works of construction and for 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment contain provisions to secure the payment of 
wages generally accepted as fair and reasonable in each trade or classification employed 
in the district where the work is being performed. 

The practice of Government departments and those Crown corporations to which the 
legislation applies, before entering into contracts for any work of construction, remodelling, 
repair or demolition, is to obtain wage schedules from the Department of Labour showing 
the applicable wage deemed to be required in the execution of the work. These wage 
schedules are thereupon included with other relevant labour conditions as terms of such 
contracts to be observed by the contractors. 

Wage schedules are not included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
equipment because it is not possible to determine in advance the classification to be 
employed in the execution of a contract. A statement of the labour conditions which 
must be observed in every such contract is, however, included therein and is of the same 
nature and effect as those which apply in works of construction. 

Copies of the federal Government's Fair Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 
may be had upon request to the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 

58 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






(b) The working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, 
or if there be no such custom, then they shall be fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during November 

During November the sum of $1,623.51 was collected from five contractors for wage 
arrears due their employees as a result of the failure of the contractors, or their sub- 
contractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required by the 
schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for distribu- 
tion to the 35 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded in November 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Near Elbow Sask: Emil Anderson Construction Co Ltd, Square M Construction Ltd 
& Coleman Collieries Ltd, construction of Qu'Appelle River Dam, SSR Project (Contract 
36). Near Lethbridge Alta: Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd, construction of main 
canal, Waterton to Belly River. 

ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LIMITED 

Chalk River Ont: Franki of Canada Ltd, supply & installation of Franki caissons for 
Bldg No 137. 

CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION 

Halifax N S: Construction Equipment Co Ltd, installation of fencing, Mulgrave Park. 
Moncton N B: Community Enterprises Ltd, construction, site work & landscaping of 103 
dwelling units (FP 1/63). Saint John N B: Cameron Contracting Ltd, construction, site work 
& landscaping of 94 dwelling units (FP 5/63). Montreal Que: The Tower Co (1961) Ltd, 
construction of retaining walls, curbs, type & chain link fencing & paving, Le Domaine 
Apartment Project; D Ferruccio & T Ricci, snow removal, Benny Farm; Ernest Rollin 
Co Ltd, snow removal Cloverdale Park; Mucci & D Trevisonno, snow removal, Le 
Domaine; Ugo Bachetti, snow removal, Park Royal. Pierrefonds Que: Andre Prefrontaine, 
repairs to MIF houses. Ville St Laurent Que: Sestock Construction Ltd, interior renova- 
tions, Park Royal Apartment Project. Ottawa Ont: Comet Electric, parking lot improve- 
ments & installation of underground electric car heater system for Strathcona Heights 
housing project. 

In addition, this Corporation awarded 15 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION 

Bruce Indian Agency Ont: Lexington Contracting Ltd, construction of school, Cape 
Croker. Portage la Prairie Indian Agency Man: Relf Plumbing & Heating Ltd, installation 
of dishwashing facilities, Brandon IRS. Carlton Indian Agency Sask: Dashchuk Construc- 
struction Ltd, installation of diesel-electric plant, outside power distribution, wiring & 
heating of school-teacherage & separate teacherage, Montreal Lake IDS. 

DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION (1951) LIMITED 

Cornwallis N S: Fundy Construction Co Ltd, renovations to bldg No 7, HMCS 
Cornwallis; Rodney Contractors Ltd, construction of earth fill dam & mains, etc, HMCS 
Cornwallis; Roy V Germain Ltd, renewal of lighting fixtures, bldg No 10, HMCS Corn- 
wallis. Shearwater N S: Diamond Construction (1961) Ltd, installation of storm sewer 
system, RCN Air Station. Renous N B: Mace Ltd, additions to electrical power distribution 
system, RCN Ammunition Depot. St Hubert Que: Great Contractors Ltd, supply & 
installation of industrial space heaters, Hangar 12, RCAF Station. Valcartier Que: 
Cardinal Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, interior painting of 199 PMQs, Camp. Centralia 
Ont: International Painting & Decorating Co, interior painting of 91 PMQs. Kingston Ont: 
E S Fox Plumbing & Heating Ltd, replacement of boiler & conversion to gas heating, bldg 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 59 



No 12. London Ont: Peerless Enterprises, Division of Tectum Ltd, re-roofing of ware- 
houses Nos 2 & 3, No 27 COD. Shirley Bay Ont: Universal Electric, Division of Univex 
Electrical Construction & Engineering Ltd, installation of roadway lighting, DRB. Trenton 
Ont: Walker Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, interior painting of 181 PMQs, Middleton 
Park; Walter F MacCormack Ltd, interior painting of eight bldgs, No 6 RD. Fort 
Churchill Man: F Fentiman & Sons Ltd, replacement of overhead doors, Bldg D-13, 
RCASC & Pan-American Vehicle Garage. Winnipeg Man: Hay Decorating Co Ltd, interior 
painting of 109 PMQs, Fort Osborne Barracks. Shilo Man: Hay Decorating Co Ltd, 
interior painting of 102 PMQs, Camp. Edmonton Aha: Ernest Painting & Decorating Ltd, 
interior painting of 120 PMQs, Griesbach Barracks. Sarcee Alta: Park & Derochie 
Decorating Co Ltd, interior painting of 10 bldgs, Camp. Alder grove B C: A B Longstaff 
& Son Ltd, land clearing, HMCS Aldergrove. Comox B C: Beaver Construction Co Ltd, 
construction of runway & taxiway & overlay of runway, taxiway & apron, RCAF Station; 
H B Contracting Ltd, installation of water main, HMCS Quadra. Masset B C: Northern 
Engine & Equipment (BC) Ltd, installation of diesel electric set, bldg No 18. 

In addition, Defence Construction (1951) Limited awarded one contract containing 
the General Fair Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE PRODUCTION 

Summer side P E I: Leonard Roofers & Metal Workers Ltd, roof repairs, RCAF 
Station. Greenwood N S: G W Sampson Construction Co Ltd, interior painting of 26 
PMQs, RCAF Station. Halifax N S: Dartmouth Asphalt Co Ltd, asphalt paving, Shannon 
Park married quarters; Harrison Bros, interior painting, bldg No 61, Windsor Park; 
Standard Paving Maritime Ltd, paving repairs, HMCS Stadacona. Bagotville Que: Les 
Entreprises d'Embellisement du Saguenay, alterations to floors in various hangars, RCAF 
Station. Montreal Que: Jos Dufour, interior painting of workshop & offices, 405 Chabanel 
St. Quebec Que: Parent & Fils Enr, interior painting, Grand Allee Armoury. Valcartier 
Que: Construction Orleans Inc, paving of various areas, CARDE. Clinton Ont: WMacDonald 
Electric Co Ltd, installation of fixed fire detection & alarm system in Bldgs 6 & 7, RCAF 
Station. Downsview Ont: Dominion Steel & Coal Corp Ltd, fencing of Keele Street 
boundary, RCAF Station. Guelph Ont: George Keen Construction Ltd, alterations to heating 
& stores accommodation, Armoury. Kingston Ont: Canada Shipbuilding & Engs Ltd, 
repairs to coal bunkers, Barriefield Camp. Oakville Ont: Toronto Building Cleaning & Tuck- 
pointing Ltd, exterior repairs to Bldgs 1A-B-C, Ortona Barracks. Petawawa Ont: Rondeau 
Electric Ltd, installation of warning lights on heating systems, Camp. Trenton Ont: Wil- 
son Concrete Products Ltd, supply & installation of prestressed concrete slabs, bldg No 28, 
RCAF Station. Calgary Alta: Borger Construction Ltd, installation of water main, Currie 
Barracks. Cold Lake Alta: "Tony" Construction Co, alteration & conversion of bldg into 
dental clinic, RCAF Station. Boundary Bay B C: M Sleightholme & Co Ltd, interior paint- 
ing, Vancouver Wireless Station. 

In addition, this Department awarded 58 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

NATIONAL HARBOURS BOARD 

Montreal Que: Hurtsteel Products Ltd, construction of dust bins for shipping galleries, 
elevators Nos 1, 2, 3 & 5. Quebec Que: Michaud & Simard Inc, paving of roadways. 
Vancouver B C: Grinnell Co of Canada Ltd, installation of sprinkler system, shed No 1, 
Lapointe Pier; Vancouver Pile Driving & Contracting Co Ltd, construction of pile dyke, 
Mosquito Creek Outfall. 

DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN AFFAIRS AND NATIONAL RESOURCES 

Kitchener, Iona & Amherstburg Ont: Litwiller Bros, removal of trees, Woodside 
National Historic Park, Southwold Earthworks National Historic Site & Fort Maiden 
National Historic Park. Prince Albert National Park Sask: North West Electric Co Ltd, 
construction of underground electrical distribution system for new serviced campground. 
Jasper National Park, Alta: Whissell Enterprises Ltd, construction of water supply main, 
septic tank & outfall sewer, Whistler Mountain Campground. Kootenay National Park B C.- 
Poole Construction Co Ltd, construction of toilet bldg, Marble Canyon & workshop bldg 
for warden's station, Kootenay Crossing. 

In addition, this Department awarded one contract containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

60 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT 

This Department awarded 53 contracts containing the General Fair Wages Clause. 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Cartwright (Labr) Nfld: J V Dawe Ltd, installation of underground electrical service 
cable for RCMP detachment quarters. Jerseyside Nfld: H Drover & Co Ltd, breastwork 
repairs. Lower Bacon Cove Nfld: Benson Builders Ltd, wharf reconstruction. St Brides 
Nfld: Benson Builders Ltd, breakwater repairs. St John's Nfld: Benson Builders Ltd, altera- 
tions & additions for Department of Forestry, Sir Humphrey Gilbert Bldg. St Lawrence 
Nfld: William A Trask Ltd, construction of retaining walls. Twillingate Nfld: W J Gould- 
ing Ltd, installation of water treatment equipment in RCMP detachment bldg. Carleton 
Village N S: Shelburne Contracting Ltd, wharf repairs. Church Point N S: Bernard & 
Gerard Lombard, wharf repairs. Lower Sandy Point N S: Shelburne Contracting Ltd, 
breakwater repairs. Murphy's Pond N S: Albert MacDonald, repairs to harbour facilities. 
Skinner's Cove N S: Joseph Almon, harbour improvements. Yarmouth N S: Marsh 
Plumbing & Heating Ltd, installation of water line. Arvida Que: Girard & Freres, repairs to 
public bldg. Chambly Que: Electra Construction Ltd, construction of post office bldg. 
Cowansville Que: Argo Construction (1961) Ltd, construction of various bldgs for 
Medium Security Institution, phase No 2. Lac St Amant Que: P E Bellehumeur, wharf 
construction. Lanoraie Que: Turnbull Construction Inc, construction of protection works 
(project No 2). Longueuil Que: Lemieux & Frere Inc, addition & alterations to post office. 
Matane Que: Fernand McMullen, breakwater repairs (east pier); Ouellet Electrique, 
installation of lighting system for town wharf. Montreal Que: Prieur Enterprises Inc, 
addition, alterations & new conveyor installation, Postal Station "E", St Laurent St. 
Natashquan Que: Pierre Paul Gauthier, construction of two classrooms & teachers quarters 
addition to IDS, Seven Islands Agency. Paspebiac Que: Jacques Normand, installation of 
wharf lighting system. Perkins Landing Que: Turnbull Construction Inc, wharf repairs. 
Pointe au Pic Que: Claude Belley, construction of concrete wall. Quebec Que: Louis 
Philippe Racine, snow removal, federal public bldgs. Ste Agathe des Monts Que: Sylvio 
Valiquette, interior alterations, federal bldg. St Jean Que: Roger Gregoire, interior painting 
of federal bldg. Ste Marthe Que: Theodose Pelletier, wharf repairs. Haliburton Ont: Bailey 
Construction Co Ltd, tourist wharf extension. Joyceville Ont: Ruliff Grass Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of water filtration plant & pumphouse, Joyceville Institution. Kempt- 
ville Ont: E A Crain Construction Ltd, installation of sewage disposal unit & subsoil 
drainage system, WSAC Bldg. McKeller Ont: Ruliff Grass Construction Co Ltd, con- 
struction of wharf. Ottawa Ont: A Lanctot, construction of loading zone, Daly Bldg; 
O'Leary's (1956) Ltd, site development, Confederation Heights. Samia Ont: Fowler 
Masonry Repair Service, interior & exterior repairs to federal bldg. Skeleton Bay (Lake 
Rousseau) Ont: Alfred Haigh, construction of wharf. Val Caron Ont: Fielding Construction 
(Sudbury) Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Wolseley Bay Ont: Albert Haigh, wharf 
repairs & extension. Lake Lenore Sask: C W Hill Construction Ltd, construction of post 
office bldg. Langham Sask: J G J Wolfe Construction Ltd, construction of post office bldg. 
Regina Sask: Beattie Ramsay Construction Co Ltd, construction of site roads, water 
distribution system & sewage disposal facilities, New Experimental Farm. Rocanville Sask: 
Logan Stevens Construction Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Calgary Alta: Befus 
Construction Ltd, alterations to areaway retaining wall, Traders Bldg. Cardston Alta: 
Weston Bros Ltd, repairs to St Mary's school gymnasium. Edmonton Alta: Parkins Con- 
struction Ltd, foundation & subfloor repairs, bldg No 19, Charles Camsell Hospital. 
Castlegar B C: Boundary Electric (Castlegar) Ltd, installation of ventilation system, 
federal bldg. Chilliwack B C: West Coast Painting Co Ltd, general repairs & repainting, 
federal bldg. Deep Bay B C: Pacific Piledriving Co Ltd, installation of float booster logs. 
Kamloops B C: Smith Bros & Wilson Ltd, construction of parking site, 359 St Paul St. 
Lund B C: Westminster Boiler & Tank Co Ltd, breakwater replacement. Vancouver B C: 
Kelsey Construction Ltd, alterations to 6th floor, Begg Bldg; Grinnell Co of Canada Ltd, 
alterations to bldg for fire protection installation, RCMP Fairmont Barracks. Westview 
B C: McKenzie Barge & Derrick Co Ltd, harbour improvements (breakwater, dredging 
& fill). Hay River N W T: Mix the Mover, moving six federal housing units. 

In addition, this Department awarded 49 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 61 



THE ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY AUTHORITY 

Near St Lambert & Beauharnois Que: Frost Steel & Wire Co (Quebec) Ltd, erection 
of chain link fencing, St Lambert, Caughnawaga, St Louis & Valleyfield Bridges. Merritton 
& Port Colborne Ont: Sheafer-Townsend Ltd, reconditioning of balance chains, Bridges 

5 & 20, Welland Canal. St Catharines Ont: Blenkhorn & Sawle Ltd, supply & installation 
of water line, Lock 3, Welland Canal. 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT 

Ramea Nfld: Newhook & Morgan Engineering Ltd, construction of bachelors' quarters, 
combined generator & radio beacon bldg & installation of fencing. Halifax N S: Diamond 
Construction (1961) Co Ltd, installation of cable ducts under runway 09-24 & taxiway, 
International Airport. Ancienne Lorette Que: La Cie de Construction des Blvds du Quebec, 
revisions to entrance road & car parking area, Que Airport. Matane Que: La Compagnie 
D'Equipement et de Construction de Rimouski Ltee, extension of runway 07-25. Fort 
William Ont: Sillman Co Ltd, alterations & extension to air terminal bldg, construction of 
operations bldg & related work, Lakehead Airport. Malton Ont: Conniston Construction 
Co Ltd, site services (Phase 3), Toronto International Airport. Near Rosedale Ont: Risi 
Stone Co Ltd, restoration of concrete at lock No 35, Trent Canal. Thompson Man: Poole 
Engineering (1958) Ltd, construction of paved runway, Airport. Edmonton Alta: Hillas 
Electric Co Ltd, installation of power to car park attendants' bldg, ticket machines & 
related work, International Airport. Empress Alta: D L Guthrie & A Dyberg, construction 
of dwelling & related work. Abbotsford B C: Bill Toews & Sons, clearing of approach to 
runway 24. Amphitrite Point B C: Quinney & Fuller Construction Ltd, construction of 
dwelling, Lightstation. Kamloops B C: Interior Contracting Co Ltd, paving of maintenance 
garage apron & access road & construction of car park & entrance road for new air 
terminal bldg. Scarlett Point B C: Canwest Construction Co Ltd, construction of dwelling 

6 tower, Lightstation. Watson Lake Y T: Nadon Sheet Metal Works Ltd, replacement of 
furnaces in five dwellings & related work. 

In addition, this Department awarded 18 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 



Recent Regulations 

{Continued from page 5S) 

to 19 units, but did not provide for a 
weekly rest for resident janitors in smaller 
buildings. 

Effective Dates. The order for the ma- 
chinist, moulder, refrigeration and sheet- 
metal trades (B.C. Reg. 179/63) went into 
force on December 9, 1963, and the order 
for elevator operators and starters (B.C. 
Reg. 190/63) on December 16. The 
revised order for janitors and resident jani- 
tors (B.C. Reg. 196/63) went into force on 
January 5, 1964. 

Order Rescinded. A 1947 order that set 
a minimum wage of $20 a week for the 
personal service occupation was rescinded 
by B.C. Reg. 191/63, gazetted November 
14. 

New Brunswick Trade Schools Act 

In New Brunswick, regulations under 
the Trade Schools Act governing hairdress- 
ing and barbering schools approved by 
O.C. 63-823 were gazetted on November 
20. 

Before a hairdressing or barbering school 
may be registered as required by the Act, 
the operator must furnish the Minister of 
Education and Municipal Affairs with a 



62 



copy of the theory examination and an 
outline of the practical examination 
acceptable to the Minister. 

Every trade school offering a hairdressing 
course must give a minimum of 1,000 hours 
of instruction, which must include at least 
150 hours of theory instruction. 

A barbering school is required to give at 
least 800 hours of instruction, which must 
include a minimum of 120 hours of theory. 

The operator of a hairdressing or bar- 
bering school may not permit an instructor 
to instruct more than 15 students at the 
same time. 

Every hairdressing and barbering school 
must supply the trainee with the necessary 
tools but provision for theft or unnecessary 
damage may be made in the contract signed 
by the student. 

Quebec Workmen's Compensation Act 

In Quebec, the Department of Tourism, 
Game and Fish was added to Schedule 2 
of the Workmen's Compensation Act by 
O.C. 1938, gazetted November 16. The 
Schedule lists the industries in which the 
employer is individually liable to pay 
compensation. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






PRICE INDEX 

Consumer Price Index, December 1963 

The consumer price index (1949=100) 
rose to 134.2 in December, up 0.1 per cent 
from the November index of 134.0 and 1.7 
per cent above the December 1962 index of 
131.9.* 

Between November and December, in- 
creases occurred for five of the seven main 
components. The Transportation component 
was lower; tobacco and alcohol showed no 
change. 

The food index rose to 131.4 from 130.8, 
an increase of 0.5 per cent. Prices were 
higher for most dairy products, fats, bakery 
and cereal products, fresh and canned vege- 
tables, poultry and a number of specific 
items, including jams, coffee, soft drinks 
and apples. Prices were considerably lower 
for eggs, oranges, bananas and sugar, and 
more moderately lower for most meats. 

The housing index edged higher to 137.0, 
up 0.1 per cent from 136.9, as a result of 
increases in the shelter component. Within 
shelter, the rent index was unchanged but 
the home-ownership index was higher. The 
household operation component was un- 
changed as scattered price increases for 
some items of furniture, floor coverings, 
textiles, utensils and equipment, and house- 
hold supplies were not sufficient to move 
the index. 

The clothing index increased 0.2 per cent 
to 118.9 from 118.7. Indexes for men's wear, 
footwear and piece goods increased while 
indexes for women's wear, children's wear 
and clothing services moved down. 

The transportation index fell 0.4 per 
cent to 140.6 from 141.2, reflecting a de- 
crease in the index of automobile operation. 
Initial prices for the 1964 models of new 
passenger cars were below the year-end 
prices of 1963 models. Prices for gasoline 
and chassis lubrication were slightly lower; 
for motor oil, somewhat higher. 

The health and personal care index 
moved to 165.4 from 164.8, an increase of 
0.4 per cent, as a result of higher prices 
for men's haircuts. 

The recreation and reading index rose 0.3 
per cent to 151.4 from 151.0. In the recrea- 
tion component, prices were higher for toys. 
A newspaper price increase in Montreal 
moved the reading component. 

The tobacco and alcohol index was un- 
changed at 118.5. 

Group indexes in December 1962 were: 
food 127.8, housing 135.7, clothing 115.8, 



* See Table F-l, page 87. 
THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



transportation 140.2, health and personal 
care 159.8, recreation and reading 148.2, 
and tobacco and alcohol 117.8. 

City Consumer Price Indexes, November '63 

Consumer price indexes rose between 
October and November in seven of the ten 
regional cities.* Increases ranged from 0.1 
per cent in Toronto and Saskatoon-Regina 
to 0.5 per cent in Winnipeg. The Ottawa 
index declined 0.1 per cent and the Edmon- 
ton-Calgary and Vancouver indexes were 
unchanged. 

Higher food indexes were common in 
six cities, the greatest increase being 1.0 
per cent in Winnipeg. Two cities had lower 
food indexes; two were unchanged. Housing 
indexes were higher in four cities, lower 
in one, and unchanged in five. Higher cloth- 
ing prices were reported in six cities, lower 
in one, and unchanged in three. In three 
cities increases were registered in the trans- 
portation index; in all others it remained 
unchanged. The health and personal care 
index moved up in eight cities and down in 
one. Indexes for recreation and reading 
were higher in all ten cities. Tobacco and 
alcohol indexes rose in one city and fell in 
three. 

Regional consumer price index point 
changes between October and November 
were: Winnipeg -f 0.6 to 131.2; St. John's 
+ 0.5 to 120.8t; Montreal +05 to 133.9; 
Saint John +0.3 to 133.3; Halifax +0.2 
to 131.4; Toronto +0.2 to 135.2; Saska- 
toon-Regina +0.1 to 128.7; Ottawa —0.2 
to 134.5. Edmonton-Calgary and Vancouver 
remained unchanged at 127.7 and 131.8 
respectively. 

Wholesale Price Index, November 1963 

The general wholesale index (1935-39= 
100) rose 0.4 per cent in November, to 
247.0 from 245.9. It was 1.9 per cent above 
the index of November 1962. 

Six major group indexes increased, one 
declined and one remained unchanged. 

The vegetable products group index 
advanced to 237.6, or 1.9 per cent from 
the October index of 233.2. The non-fer- 
rous metals products group index rose 0.6 
per cent to 199.7 from 198.6 a month 
earlier; the wood products group index of 
326.4 was 0.5 per cent above the October 
index of 324.8; and the textile products 
group index moved up 0.4 per cent to 249.7 
from 248.8. The indexes of the non-metallic 
minerals products group and the chemical 
products group both rose 0.3 per cent to 
191.0 from 190.5, and to 188.8 from 188.2, 
respectively. 

*See Table F-2, p. 87. 
tOn base June 1951=100. 



63 



The animal products group index declined 
to 250.3 from 252.7, or 0.9 per cent. 

The iron products group index was un- 
changed at 254.4. 

The index of Canadian farm product 
prices at terminal markets (1935-39=100) 
advanced 0.5 per cent, from 214.7 to 215.7, 
in the three-week period ended November 
22. The animal products index rose 0.9 
per cent from 265.3 to 267.8, and the field 
products index eased 0.2 per cent from 164.1 
to 163.7. 

The residential building material price 
index, on the base 1935-39=100, advanced 
0.4 per cent from 313.4 to 314.7 between 
October and November, and on the 1949= 
100 base, from 137.5 to 138.0. The non- 
residential index (1949=100) rose 0.2 per 
cent from 136.8 to 137.1. 



U.S. Consumer Price Index, November '63 

The United States consumer price index 
(1957-59=100) rose by 0.2 per cent, from 
107.2 to 107.4, between mid-October and 
mid-November. The increase resulted largely 
from unseasonal rises in food prices. Prices 
for 1963 as a whole are expected to reach 
a five-year high. 

The November 1962 index was 106.0. 

British Index of Retail Prices, October 1963 

The British index of retail prices (Jan. 
16, 1962=100) rose from 103.3 to 103.7 
between mid-September and mid-October. 
The month's rise was attributed to increases 
in the price of sugar, potatoes and milk. 

The food index was up from 103.0 to 
104.2. 

The index for October 1962 was 101.4. 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not 
for sale by the Department of Labour. 
Persons wishing to purchase them should 
communicate with the publishers. Publica- 
tions listed may be borrowed by making 
application to the Librarian, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. Students must apply 
through the library of their institution. 
Applications for loans should give the 
number (numeral) of the publication 
desired and the month in which it was 
listed in the Labour Gazette. 

List No. 183 
Accident Prevention 

1. INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OF- 
FICE. Manual of Industrial Radiation Pro- 
tection. Part 1. Convention and Recom- 
mendation concerning the Protection of 
Workers against Ionizing Radiations, 
adopted by the International Labour Con- 
ference at its 44th Session, Geneva, June 
1960. Geneva, 1963. Pp. 24. 

2. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STAND- 
ARDS. Static Electricity. Washington, 
GPO, 1963. Pp. 20. 

How to conirol the hazards of static 
electricity. 

3. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STAND- 
ARDS. Using Injury Statistics. Washington, 
GPO, 1963. Pp. 18. 

"... Discusses the latitude and limitations 
of injury statistics and suggests how such 
statistics can be utilized as a means for estab- 
lishing an injury prevention program." 



Annual Reports 

4. CANADA. BUREAU OF STA- 
TISTICS. Annual Report for the Fiscal 
Year ended March 31, 1963. Ottawa, 
Queen's Printer, 1963. Pp. 46. 

5. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF 
LABOUR. Annual Report for the Fiscal 
Year ended March 31, 1963. Ottawa, 
Queen's Printer, 1963. Pp. 92. 

6. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF LA- 
BOUR. ACCIDENT PREVENTION AND 
COMPENSATION BRANCH. Eleventh 
Annual Statistical Report of Claims for 
Work Injuries of Federal Public Service 
Employees for the Fiscal Year ending 
March 31, 1963. Ottawa, 1963. Pp. 15. 

7. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF LA- 
BOUR. ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH 
BRANCH. Annual Earnings in the Scien- 
tific and Technical Professions, 1962; a 
Preliminary Report. Ottawa, Queen's 
Printer, 1963. Pp. 8. 

French text inverted. French title is, Gains 
annuels dans les professions scientifiques et 
techniques, en 1962. 

8. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF LA- 
BOUR. ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH 
BRANCH. Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours 
of Labour. Annual Report No. 45. October 
1962. Taux de salaires, traitements et heures 
de travail. Rapport annuel no. 45. Octobre 
1962. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1962. Pp. 
400. Text in English and French. 



64 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



9. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF LA- 
BOUR. TECHNICAL AND VOCATION- 
AL TRAINING BRANCH. Report of the 
Director of Technical and Vocational 
Training for the Fiscal Year ended March 
31, 1962. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1963. 
Pp. 23. 

Reprinted from the Annual Report of the 
Department of Labour for the same period. 

10. CANADA. NATIONAL PRODUC- 
TIVITY COUNCIL. Second Annual Re- 
port, 1962-1963. Ottawa, 1963. Pp. 91. 

11. CANADIAN AUTOMOBILE 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. Facts and 
Figures of the Automotive Industry. 1963 
Edition. Toronto, 1963. Pp. 44. 

12. GREAT BRITAIN. FACTORY IN- 
SPECTORATE. Annual Report of the Chief 
Inspector of Factories, 1962. London, 
HMSO, 1963. Pp. 124. 

13. GREAT BRITAIN. FACTORY IN- 
SPECTORATE. Annual Report of the 
Chief Inspector of Factories on Industrial 
Health, 1962. London, HMSO, 1963. 
Pp. 58. 

14. NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT 
OF LABOUR. Report for the Year ended 
31 March 1963. Wellington, Government 
Printer, 1963. Pp. 77. 

15. UNITED NATIONS. ECONOMIC 
COMMISSION FOR EUROPE. The Situa- 
tion and Future Prospects of Europe's 
Electric Power Supply Industry in 1961/62. 
Geneva, 1963. Pp. 87. 

16. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STAND- 
ARDS. Annual Digest of State and 
Federal Labour Legislation for the Years 
1961 and 1962. Washington, GPO, 1963. 
Pp. 249. 

Automation 

17. CONFERENCE ON AUTOMATION 
AND PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. 

Proceedings. lst-2nd. 1962-1963. Washing- 
ton, Society for Personnel Administration, 
1962-1963. 2 volumes. 

These two conferences deal with the part 
played by automation in personnel admin- 
istration. 

18. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS RE- 
SEARCH ASSOCIATION. Adjusting to 
Technological Change. Editors: Gerald G. 
Somers [and others] New York, Harper, 
1963. Pp. 230. 

Contents: Gains and Costs of Technical 
Change, by Walter Buckingham. Organized 
Labor and Technical Change: a Backward 
Look, by Philip Taft. The Impact of Tech- 
nology on Labor-Management Relations, by 
Jack Barbash. Cooperative Approaches to 
Problems of Technological Change, by 
Charles C. Killingsworth. The Interplant 
Transfer of Displaced Employees, by Arnold 



R. Weber. The Armour Experience: A Case 
Study in Plant Shutdown. Technological 
Change and the Community, by Sar A. 
Levitan and Harold L. Sheppard. Policy Im- 
plications of Technological Change in Western 
Europe, by Bertil Olsson. 

19. SYMPOSIUM ON THE EDUCA- 
TIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF AUTOMA- 
TION, WASHINGTON, DC, 1962. 
Automation and the Challenge of Educa- 
tion; Proceedings of a Symposium, held in 
Washington, D.C. Sponsored by the Pro- 
ject on the Educational Implications of 
Automation, National Education Associa- 
tion. Edited by Luther H. Evans and 
George E. Arnstein. Washington, National 
Education Association, 1962. Pp. 190. 

The educational implications of automation 
were examined by an educational policy 
planner, a curriculum specialist, a social 
psychologist, a business executive, a trade 
union official, an economist, a political 
scientist, an educational administrator, and a 
•sociologist. 

Business 

20. EUROPEAN PRODUCTIVITY 
AGENCY. Cost Reduction in Industry; an 
Integrated Approach to the Practical Ap- 
plication of Progressive Management 
Techniques for the Control and Reduction 
of Cost. Paris, 1961. Pp. 170. 

Contains basic information about cost reduc- 
tion and selected factual case studies illustrat- 
ing practical applications. 

21. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON 
SMALL BUSINESS, WASHINGTON, D.C, 

1961. Problems and Opportunities con- 
fronting Negroes in the Field of Business; 
Report. Chairman: Charles O. Diggs, Jr. 
Editor: H. Taylor Fitzhugh. [Washington, 
GPO, 1962, i.e. 1963] Pp. 102. 

"Sponsored by an independent committee 
composed mainly of Negroes engaged in 
business and related activities in Government 
and education and some national organiza- 
tions." 

22. U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION. Starting and managing a 
Small Motel, by Harold Whittington. 
Washington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 70. 

Contents: What is it like in the Motel Busi- 
ness? Things to decide before You invest in 
a Motel. Financial Arrangements. Getting 
ready to open. Good Hostmanship. Keeping 
Your Records Straight. Motel Advertising and 
Promotion. Motel Housekeeping. Looking out 
for Your Future. For Further Information. 

Civil Service 

23. HOLLAND, ANN (UNRUH). 
Unions are here to stay; a Guide for Em- 
ployee-Management Relations in the 
Federal Service. Washington, Society for 
Personnel Administration, 1962. Pp. 41. 

A brief outline of the report of the "Presi- 
dent's Task Force on Employee-Management 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 

73306-3—5 



65 



Relations in the Federal Service and of two 
Presidential Executive Orders dealing with 
Employee-Management Relations. 

24. SYMPOSIUM [ON] ACHIEVING 
EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC SERVICE, 
PHILADELPHIA, 1963. Achieving Excel- 
lence in Public Service; a Symposium, spon- 
sored by the American Academy of Politi- 
cal and Social Science and the American 
Society for Public Administration. Edited 
by Stephen B. Sweeney and James O. 
Charlesworth. [Lancaster, Pa.] American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, 
1963. Pp. 209. 

The Symposium dealt with public admin- 
istration needs in the U.S. and with the 
quality of public administration personnel. 

Economic Conditions 

25. EUROPEAN ECONOMIC COM- 
MUNITY. COMMISSION. The First 
Stage of the Common Market; Report on 
the Execution of the Treaty (January 1958- 
January 1962). Brussels, 1962. Pp. 115 [5] 

26. NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL CON- 
FERENCE BOARD. Fiscal Policy, Cycles 
and Growth, by Michael E. Levy. New 
York, 1963. Pp. 141. 

Partial Contents: Fiscal Stagnation: Evidence 
and Proposed Remedies. Government Saving 
and Full Employment: a Structural Analysis. 
Budget Deficits and Growth: European Ex- 
perience. Potential GNP: Concept and 
Measurement. The Full-Employment Budget 
Surplus: Concept and Measurement Problems. 
The National-Income-Accounts Budget as a 
Tool for Fiscal Analysis. 

27. ORGANIZATION FOR ECO- 
NOMIC COOPERATION AND DE- 
VELOPMENT. Economic Surveys: Ireland. 
March 1963. Paris, 1963. Pp. 28. 

28. UNITED NATIONS. SECRE- 
TARIAT. International Flow of Long-term 
Capital and Official Donations, 1959-1961. 
New York, United Nations, Dept. of Eco- 
nomic and Social Affairs, 1963. Pp. 66. 

"Examines the flow of funds from the 
developed countries, the flow of funds to the 
under-developed countries and the inter- 
national economic assistance of the centrally 
planned economies during the years 1959- 
1961." Also reviews the international flow of 
private capital during 1959-1961. 

Education, Vocational 

29. LEVITAN, SAR A. Vocational 
Education and Federal Policy (Admin- 
istration Bills H.R. 3000 and S. 580, Con- 
gressman Carl D. Perkins H.R. 4955, 
Senator J. Caleb Boggs S. 1222) Kalama- 
zoo, Mich., W. E. Upjohn Institute for Em- 
ployment Research, 1963. Pp. 30. 

A brief look at existing U.S. federal pro- 
grams in vocational education and current 
proposals for the extension of vocational train- 
ing. 



30. ONTARIO. LEGISLATIVE ASSEM- 
BLY. SELECT COMMITTEE ON MAN- 
POWER TRAINING. Report. February, 
1963. Toronto, 1963. Pp. 126. 

The Select Committee on Manpower Train- 
ing of the Ontario Legislature was set up to 
look into the Apprenticeship Act, all aspects 
of the apprenticeship system, the training, 
retraining and upgrading of skills of workers, 
and the role to be played by government, 
industry and labour in the field of training. 

31. SMITH, HAROLD T. Education and 
Training for the World of Work; a Voca- 
tional Education Program for the State of 
Michigan. With Solicited Chapters on Pro- 
grams in Other States. Kalamazoo, Mich., 
W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment 
Research, 1963. Pp. 165. 

Examines vocational education in Michigan 
and suggests what institutions, what admin- 
istrative organization, and what financial struc- 
ture are needed to meet the needs of voca- 
tional education in Michigan. There are also 
chapters dealing with vocational education in 
10 other States. 

Employees — Training 

32. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STA- 
TISTICS. Industrial Retraining Programs 
for Technological Change; a Study of the 
Performance of Older Workers. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1963. Pp. 34. 

This report is based on a study of four 
companies in different industries where 
technological changes were introduced, requir- 
ing the retraining of employees. It shows 
something of the capacity of older workers in 
industry to adopt to technological change. 

33. U.S. OFFICE OF MANPOWER, 
AUTOMATION AND TRAINING. Young 
Workers: Their Special Training Needs. 
Washington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 19. 

"... Reviews the training needs and the 
status of training for young men and women 
between the ages of 14 and 19 years who will 
be entering the labor market with a high 
school education or less. Particular emphasis 
is placed on youths who will have special 
problems in finding employment because of 
their race, physical and mental handicaps, or 
for other reasons." 

Employment Management 

34. BUREAU OF NATIONAL AF- 
FAIRS, WASHINGTON, D.C. Employee 
Selection Procedures. Washington, 1963. 
Pp. 13. 

This survey is based on information sup- 
plied by 170 personnel and industrial rela- 
tions executives. The procedures for hiring 
that are considered are the application form, 
pre-employment testing, pre-employment physi- 
cal examinations, and pre-employment inter- 
viewing. 



66 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



35. BUREAU OF NATIONAL AF- 
FAIRS, WASHINGTON, D.C. Practices for 
White-Collar Employees. Washington, 1963. 
Pp. 13. 

An examination of the present state of 
fringe benefits and hours of work. Information 
for this study was based on replies from 175 
personnel and industrial relations executives. 

36. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF LA- 
BOUR. ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH 
BRANCH. Vacations with Pay, 1951-1961; 
an Examination of Vacation Practices in 
Canadian Industries. Ottawa, Queen's 
Printer, 1963. Pp. 32. 

Provides information about the development 
of paid-vacation practices in Canadian manu- 
facturing industries during the period 1951- 
1961 and about vacation practices and pat- 
terns. Also tells about the length of the vaca- 
tion and the period of employment required 
to qualify for specific paid vacations. 

37. GREAT BRITAIN. DEPARTMENT 
OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RE- 
SEARCH. The Supervisor and his Job, by 
K. E. Thurley and A. C. Hamblin. Lon- 
don, HMSO, 1963. Pp. 40. 

An interim report on a research project on 
"Systems of Supervision" carried out by a 
team from the London School of Economics 
over a five-year period from 1959 to 1963. 
An attempt is made to examine the tasks per- 
formed by supervisors in five different in- 
dustries to see how much variation, and how 
much there is in common in the jobs of 
supervisors in different situations. 

38. NEW YORK (STATE) DEPART- 
MENT OF LABOR. DIVISION OF RE- 
SEARCH AND STATISTICS. Union-Man- 
agement Agreements in New York State- 
Selected Provisions, Jury Duty Pay, Funeral 
Leave Pay, Overtime, Supplementary 
Unemployment Benefits. New York, 1963. 
Pp. 29. 

Based on a study of 1,786 agreements 
covering 1,800,000 workers at the beginning 
of 1961. 

39. ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 

Fitting the Job to the Worker; Seminar on 
Ergonomics for Engineers, Liege, 5-12 
September, 1961. General report by S. 
Laner. [Paris, 1963?] Pp. 106. 

Contents: The Structure of Engineering 
Education in the Participating Countries. 
Present State and Outlook for Ergonomics 
in Engineering Training Establishments. Open- 
ing Session of the Seminar. Programme of 
Lectures and Other Events — Final Sessions. 
Recommendations to the O.E.C.D. and to 
Other International Bodies. 

40. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STA- 
TISTICS. Digest of Nine Supplemental Un- 
employment Benefit Plans, Early 1963. 
Washington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 25. 

"... Summarizes the major provisions of 
nine supplemental unemployment benefit plans 
designed primarily to provide weekly supple- 
ments to State unemployment insurance bene- 
fits received by laid-off workers." 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 

73306-3— 5£ 



Labour Organization 

41. AUSTRALIAN WORKERS' UNION. 

Official Report of the Seventy-seventh 
Annual Convention . . . Sydney, New South 
Wales . . . together with Head Office and 
"Worker" Accounts. Sydney, 1963. Pp. 196. 
Convention held Jan. 29 to Feb. 6, 1963. 

42. CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS. 

The Truth about Unions on the Lakes; a 
Summary of Findings of a Year-long In- 
vestigation conducted by an Official Cana- 
dian Government Commission. Ottawa, 
1963. Pp. 22. 

A summary of the findings of the Norris 
Commission (the Industrial Inquiry Com- 
mission Concerning Matters Relating to the 
Disruption of Shipping on the Great Lakes, 
the St. Lawrence River System and Connect- 
ing Waters) 

43. ST. PATRICK'S COLLEGE, 
OTTAWA. EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

Labour Unions, an Introductory Course for 
Individuals and Study Groups. 2d ed. Text 
and references completely revised. Edited by 
Mary Kehoe. Ottawa, 1963. Pp. 167. 

Partial Contents: The Role of Unions in 
Society. Collective Bargaining. Workers' Rights 
and Duties. The Wage Package. Union 
Security. Grievances. Union Structure. Labour 
Legislation. Strikes. Labour and Co-operatives. 

Labouring Classes 

44. AMERICAN FEDERATION OF 
LABOR AND CONGRESS OF INDUS- 
TRIAL ORGANIZATIONS. DEPART- 
MENT OF RESEARCH. Shorter Hours: 
Tool to combat Unemployment. Washing- 
ton, 1963. Pp. 53. 

Based on a series of articles appearing in 
the American Federationist. 

The AFL-CIO Executive Council favors a 
35-hour basic work- week. This pamphlet pre- 
sents arguments for a 35-hour week. 

45. NORTH AMERICAN CONFER- 
ENCE ON THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS 
OF INDUSTRIALIZATION AND TECH- 
NOLOGICAL CHANGE, CHICAGO, 

1960. Industrialization and Society; [Pro- 
ceedings] edited by Bert F. Hoselitz [and] 
Wilbert E. Moore. [Prepared by the Inter- 
national Social Science Council with the 
assistance of the Ecole pratique des hautes 
etudes (vi e section). Paris] UNESCO, 1963. 
Pp. 437. 

This Conference was sponsored jointly by 
UNESCO, the Canadian and the United 
States National Commissions for UNESCO, 
and the University of Chicago and was held 
in Chicago from September 15 to 22, 1960. 

46. ONTARIO FARMER-LABOUR 
CONFERENCE. 4th, PORT ELGIN, ONT., 
1963. Report. Toronto, Ontario Federation 
of Labour, 1963. Pp. 54. 



67 



Sponsored by the Farmer-Labour Committee 
of the Ontario Federation of Labour with the 
co-operation of the Farmer-Labour Co-ordinat- 
ing Council of the Canadian Labour Congress. 

Research, Industrial 

47. NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL CON- 
FERENCE BOARD. Research and 
Development: its Growth and Composition, 
by Nestor E. Terleckyj. Assisted by Har- 
riet J. Halper. New York, 1963. Pp. 115. 

Contents: The Research Background. Basic 
Structure of Research and Development. 
Research and Development in Industry. 
Organizational Composition of Industrial R & 
D Operations. Composition of Research Staffs 
and Costs. Intensity of Industrial Research. 

48. U.S. NATIONAL SCIENCE 
FOUNDATION. Research and Develop- 
ment in Industry, 1960; Final Report on a 
Survey of R & D Funds and R&D Scien- 
tists and Engineers. Washington, 1963. Pp. 
118. 

An analysis of the expenditure of $14 bil- 
lion on industrial research and development in 
1960. 

Science 

49. CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF 
LABOUR. ECONOMICS AND RE- 
SEARCH BRANCH. Technicians in 
Science and Engineering. Ottawa, Queen's 
Printer, 1963. Pp. 81. 

Contents: Nature of the Work. Fields of 
Work. Preparation and Training. Personal 
Qualities Needed. Advancement. Earnings. 
Organizations. Employment Outlook. Seeking 
Employment. Includes a list of educational 
establishments and of typical occupations. 

50. CONFERENCE ON SCIENTIFIC 
MANPOWER. 11th, PHILADELPHIA, 

1962. Scientific Manpower, 1962; Papers of 
the Eleventh Annual Conference on 
Scientific Manpower. Washington, GPO, 

1963. Pp. 46. 

The general theme of the conference was 
"Community Programs for Motivation to 
Science and Engineering Training" aimed at 
secondary school levels of education. 

51. U.S. NATIONAL SCIENCE 
FOUNDATION. Profiles of Manpower in 
Science and Technology. Washington, 1963. 
Pp. 36. 

By means of charts and tables, this booklet 
presents some statistical information about 
the numbers of people who are employed in 
the U.S. as scientists, engineers, technicians, 
and teachers of science and mathematics in 
secondary schools. 

Women 

52. CLARK, FREDERICK LE GROS. 

Woman, Work and Age; to study the Em- 
ployment of Working Women throughout 
Their Middle Lives. London, Nuffield 
Foundation, 1962. Pp. 111. 



Partial Contents: Married Women in the 
Labour Market. Bearing of the Marital State 
on Employment: (1) The Widowed Woman; 
(2) The Single Woman. Women who need to 
limit their Working Hours. Conditions that 
affect for Women the Limitation of Working 
Hours. The Age of Women's Withdrawal from 
Outside Work. The Later Working Lives of 
Employed Women. Impaired Health and the 
Rates of Withdrawal from Work. The Older 
Woman in the Manufacturing Industries. 

53. CONFERENCE OF REPRESENTA- 
TIVES OF UNIONS CATERING FOR 
WOMEN WORKERS. Women Workers, 
1963; Industrial Chapter for Women and 
Report of the 33rd Annual Conference of 
Representatives of Trade Unions Catering 
For Women Workers. London, Trades 
Union Congress, 1963. Pp. 56. 

54. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WO- 
MEN OF CANADA. Year Book, 1963. 
Ottawa, 1963. Pp. 124. 

55. U.S. PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION 
ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN. American 
Women; Report. Washington, GPO, 1963. 
Pp. 86. 

Contains recommendations dealing with the 
following topics: education and counseling, 
home and community, women in employment, 
labour standards, security of basic income, 
women under the law, and women as citizens. 

Miscellaneous 

56. LONDON, ONT. UNIVERSITY OF 
WESTERN ONTARIO. FACULTY OF 
LAW. Current Law and Social Problems. 
Volume III. Editor: E. E. Palmer. Toronto, 
University of Toronto Press, 1963. Pp. 237. 

Partial Contents. — The Law and Industrial- 
ism, by I. C. Rand. Jurisdictional Disputes in 
Canada: a Study in Frustration, by J. H. G. 
Crispo and H. W. Arthurs. The Drift toward 
a British National Wages Policy, by W. F. 
Frank. Labour Legislation in the Province of 
Quebec, by Marie-Louis Beaulieu. Peaceful 
Picketing and the Criminal Code, by R. S. 
Mackay. Conciliation Boards in British 
Columbia, by Raymond G. Herbert. 

57. PHILLIPS, WALTER. Technological 
Levels and Labor Resistance to change in 
the Course of Industrialization. Berkeley, 
University of California, Institute of In- 
dustrial Relations, 1963. Pp. 257-266. 

58. SASKATCHEWAN. AGED AND 
LONG-TERM ILLNESS SURVEY COM- 
MITTEE. Report and Recommendations 
[and Supplementary Documents. Regina, 
Queen's Printer, 1962-1963] 4 volumes. 

Contents: [1] Report and Recommendations. 
[2] Survey of Employers. [3] Information and 
Opinion Survey of Senior Citizens. [4] Sur- 
vey of Patients aged 65 and over in Mental 
Hospitals, Tuberculosis Sanatoria, Geriatric 
Centres, and Nursing Homes. 



68 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-l to A-3— Labour Force 69 

Table B-l — Labour Income 71 

Tables C-l to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 72 

Tables D-l to D-5 — Employment Service Statistics 78 

Tables E-l to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance P'A 

Tables F-l and F-2— Prices 87 

Tables G-l to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 88 

Tables H-l and H-2— Industrial Fatalities 90 



A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-l— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 14, 1963 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



The Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

14-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-44 years 

45-64 years 

65 years and over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agriculture 

Non-agriculture 

Paid Workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons not in the Labour Force 

Men 1 . 

Women 

*Less than 10,000. 



Canada 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Region 


6,774 


587 


1,912 


2,502 


1.153 


4,841 
1,933 


441 
146 


1,386 
526 


1,739 
763 


829 
324 


644 

866 

3,029 

2,026 

209 


58 

92 

244 

174 

19 


202 
293 
862 
501 
51 


219 

277 

1,139 

786 

81 


115 
138 
503 
356 

41 


6,428 


537 


1,782 


2,413 


1,116 


1,547 

1,881 


394 

143 


1,275 
507 


1,667 
746 


797 
319 


581 
5,847 


35 
502 


102 
1,680 


155 

2,258 


277 
839 


5,325 


442 


1,539 


2,074 


762 


3,618 
1,707 


313 
129 


1,069 
470 


1,391 
683 


488 
274 


346 


50 


130 


89 


37 


294 
52 


47 

* 


111 
19 


72 
17 


32 


5,811 


686 


1,711 


1,882 


985 


1,408 
■ 4,403 


193 
493 


400 
1,311 


421 
1,461 


251 
734 



British 
Columbia 



620 



446 
174 

50 

66 

281 

206 

17 

580 

414 
166 

12 
568 

508 

357 
151 

40 

32 



143 
404 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



69 



T ABLE- A-2— AGE, SEX AND MARITAL STATUS 
WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 14, 1963, CANADA 

(Estimates in thousands) 

Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 





Total 


14-19 
years 

all 
persons 




20 64 


years 




65 years 

and over 

all 


— 


Men 


Women 




Married 


Other 


Married 


Other 


persons 


Population 14 years of age and over ti) 


12,585 

6,774 

6,428 

346 

5,811 

53.8 
54.1 

5.1 
4.5 


1,954 

644 

579 

65 

1,310 

33.0 
33.1 

10.1 
9.6 


3,632 

3,488 

3,334 

154 

144 

96.0 
96.4 

4.4 
3.5 


986 

833 

752 

81 

153 

84.5 
85.0 

9.7 

8.7 


3,741 

945 

928 

17 

2,796 

25.3 
25.5 

1.8 
2.0 


922 

655 

637 

18 

267 

71.0 
71.0 

2.7 
2.9 


1,350 
209 




198 




11 




1,141 


Participation rate < 2) 

1963, December 14 


15.5 




15.7 


Unemployment rate < 3 > 

1963, December 14 


5.3 











^'Excludes inmates of institutions, members of the armed services, Indians living on reserves and residents of the 
Yukon and Northwest Territories. 

< 2 >The labour force as a percentage of the population 14 years of age and over. 
( 3 >The unemployed as a percentage of the labour force. 
*Less than 10,000. 



TABLE A-3— UNEMPLOYED, WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 14, 1963 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



— 


December 
1963 


November 
1963 


December 
1962 




346 

20 
326 

305 
21 

121 
132 
35 

38 


303 

17 
286 

270 
16 

111 
99 
34 

42 


414 


On temporary layoff up to 30 days 


27 




387 




366 


Seeking part-time work 


21 


Seeking under 1 month 


127 




165 




51 


Seeking more than 6 months 


44 







70 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



B — Labour Income 

TABLE B-l-ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME, BY INDUSTRY 

Note: Monthly and quarterly figures may not add to annual totals because of rounding. 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals^) 


Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation ( 2 > 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 


Totals 

(3) 


1958— Total.... 
1959— Total.... 
1960— Total.... 
1961— Total.... 
1962— Total.... 

1962— 


527 
552 
560 
554 
570 

47.9 
47.6 
46.6 

47.5 
47.8 
47.0 
46.7 
48.1 
49.2 
49.9 
49.8 
50.1 
49.7 


4,823 
5,096 
5,246 

5,404 
5,808 

498.9 
495.2 
481.5 

484.4 
488.7 
493.9 
503.2 
514.9 
523.0 
509.4 
523.4 
532.6 
531.7 


1,685 
1,785 
1,810 
1,861 
1,910 

165.2 
162.0 
157.1 

157.7 
157.6 
156.3 
160.7 
165.7 
170.0 
171.9 
179.9 
172.4 
172.4 


270 
288 
326 
285 
306 


1,317 
1,279 
1,214 
1,224 
1,326 


307 
332 
348 
362 
384 


2,360 
2,528 
2,640 
2,740 
2,884 


4,303 
4,652 
5,099 
5,596 
6,079 


727 
743 
795 
824 
867 


16,521 
17,459 
18,251 
19,068 
20,359 

1,764.8 


November... 


86.1 


336.0 


99.5 


750.6 


1,556.8 


221.4 


1,743.0 
1,692.5 


1963 — 














1,699.4 


February 


68.0 


272.8 


97.2 


731.9 


1,603.0 


222.1 


1,699.8 
1,714.1 
















1,764.8 




68.6 


345.0 


102.5 


763.7 


1,668.8 


228.1 


1,807.9 




1,863.0 


July 














1,830.6 
















1,877.3 


September*.. 


93.3* 


412.1* 


106.0* 


781.3* 


1,667.5* 


232.4* 


1,907.5 
1,896.4 



















Seasonally Adjusted 



1958— Total.... 
1959— Total. . . . 
1960— Total.... 
1961— Total.... 
1962— Total.... 

1962 — 


527 
552 
560 
554 

570 

47.6 
47.4 
46.8 

48.1 
48.7 
47.6 
48.6 
48.0 
48.2 
48.8 
48.8 
49.4 
49.4 


4,823 
5.096 
5,246 
5,404 
5,808 

491.5 
494.3 
494.3 

499.5 

500.6 

503.3* 

508.7 

510.7 

508.8 

507.4 

514.8 

517.5 

524.0 


1,685 
1,785 
1,810 
1,861 
1,910 

161.9 
160.6 
160.4 

164.4 
164.6 
164.8 
165.9 
164.7 
164.7 
164.0 
171.9 
166.8 
168.7 


270 
288 
326 
285 
306 


1,317 
1,279 
1,214 
1,224 
1,326 


307 
332 
348 
362 
384 


2,360 
2,528 
2,640 
2,740 
2,884 


4,303 
4,652 
5,099 
5,596 
6,079 


727 
743 
795 
824 
867 


16,521 
17,459 
18,251 
19,068 
20,359 

1,722.8 


November. . . 

December . . . 


74.0 


334.8 


99.4 


733.6 


1,558.6 


220.4 


1,728.7 
1,730.1 


1963— 
January 














1,771.4 


February 


77.4 


348.4 


99.8 


751.7 


1,615.7 


225.4 


1,768.8 
1,777.9* 
















1,789.8 


May 


78.7 


346.7 


102.7 


763.6 


1,638.2 


227.9 


1,794.6 


June 


1,799.8 


July 














1.800.1 


August 

September*.. 


86.1* 


339.1* 


103.2* 


779.1* 


1,683.6* 


230.4* 


1,832.9 
1,835.2 


October t 














1,851.5 



















("Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 
^Includes post office wages and salaries. 

(3)Figures m this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining 
columns of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. 
*Re vised. 
tPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



71 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees; 
at October 1963 employer in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total 
employment of 2,963,858. Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat 
smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage-earners for 
whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate 
to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-l EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Year and .Month 



Averages 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962— 

October. . . 
November 
December. 

1963— 

January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October!.. 



Industrial Composite^' 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



122.6 
117.9 
119.7 
118.7 
118.1 



125.4 
124.3 
120.2 



117.8 
117.4 
117.7 
119.3 
123.6 
127.5 
127.7 
130.2 
130.3 
129.3 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



158.1 
163.9 
171.0 
176.5 
181.8 



189.9 
189.8 
182.6 



190.6 
192.9 
193.1 
194.4 
194.8 
194.7 
193.8 
193.9 
196.0 
197.1 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



67.93 
70.43 
73.47 
75.83 
78.11 



81.57 
81.53 
78.45 



81.80 
82.87 
82.96 
83.53 
83.69 
83.64 
83.27 
83.28 
84.22 
84.67 



Manufacturing 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



115.8 
109.8 
111.1 
109.5 
108.9 



115.9 
114.7 
110.9 



111.6 
112.2 
112.8 
113.7 
116.3 
118.9 
116.9 
120.0 
120.3 
119.2 



Average 
Weekly 

Wages 

and 
Salaries 



159.1 
165.3 
172.5 
117.8 
183.9 



191.8 
192.3 
183.6 



193.5 
194.2 
195.5 
197.2 
197.4 
196.2 
194.0 
194.4 
197.2 
198.9 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



69.94 
72.67 
75.84 
78.19 
80.73 



84.34 
84.55 

80.71 



85.09 
85.41 
85.95 
86.72 
86.80 
86.29 
85.30 
85.47 
86.71 
87.45 



(''Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and recrea- 
tional service). 

*Re vised. 

tPreliminary. 



72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






TABLE O?— AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1919=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

SOURCE: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Area 



Provinces 



Newfoundland 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta (including Northwest Territories). 
British Columbia (including Yukon) 



Cannil; 



Urban areas 



St. John's 

Sydney 

Halifax 

Moncton , 

Saint John 

Chicoutimi — Jonquiere 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Shawinigan 

Three Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal , 

Ottawa— Hull 

Kingston 

Peterborough 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

St. Catharines 

Niagara Falls 

Brantford 

Guelph 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Fort William— Port Arthur. 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 



Employment Index Numbers 



Oct. 

1963 



150.1 
153.3 
100.5 
109.9 
129.7 
130.9 
117.3 
135.7 
163.9 
123.1 

129.3 



152. 

82. 
125. 
109. 
106. 
117. 
129. 
116. 
100. 
121. 

89. 
133. 
140. 
127. 
104. 
213. 
146. 
120. 
117. 
105. 

93. 
132. 
126. 
147. 
125. 

87. 
146. 
136. 

81. 
154. 
114. 
117. 
155. 
149. 
210. 
183. 
121. 
119. 



Sept. 
1963 



151.0 
146.5 
101.0 
111.3 
130.3 
131.5 
118.9 
136.5 
168.8 
126.0 

130.3 



155.6 

81.9 
126.7 
107.9 
106.7 
116.6 
129.6 
115.8 
101.6 
120.3 

90.4 
133.5 
140.7 
129.6 
102.9 
206.6 
146.1 
121.7 
120.0 
113.7 

92.3 
133.4 
126.1 
145.1 
127.0 

87.5 
145.7 
135.0 

81.9 
153.9 
115.4 
117.9 
153.6 
153.0 
213.7 
185.3 
123.8 
122.3 



Oct. 

1962 



147.3 
154.3 
96.6 
107.6 
126.5 
126.2 
115.3 
130.6 
161.9 
118.3 

125.4 



154.7 

79.0 
124.1 
112.5 
106.1 
110.8 
125.5 
114.1 

83.1 
119.1 

84.6 
129.8 
136.2 
120.6 

95.8 
192.6 
141.4 
114.5 
114.3 
100.4 

87.9 
129.9 
116.9 
137.2 
128.7 

89.2 
139.2 
129.5 

74.7 
147.0 
110.4 
113.8 
144.5 
142.9 
207.6 
182.3 
115.6 
118.1 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 



Oct. 

1963 



77.14 
58.27 
68.65 
68.26 
82.75 
87.79 
78.71 
80.97 
85.45 
91.50 

84.67 



64.86 
82.74 
71.10 
63.43 
69.57 

103.24 
72.95 
70.80 
92.30 
78.86 
69.89 
84.04 
77.87 
83.80 
93.77 

106.39 
88.48 
91.37 
96.24 
82.15 
79.21 
78.79 
76.03 
78.34 
94.95 
75.26 
80.25 

108.31 
99.10 

107.05 
85.01 
75.13 
79.88 
74.71 
79.03 
84.36 
89.93 
82.51 



Sept. 
1963 



76.62 
59.01 
69.28 
67.79 
82.06 
87.36 
79.03 
80.96 
84.52 
91.01 

84.22 



64.17 
83.90 
70.93 
63.88 
69.74 

102.32 
73.11 
72.00 
92.86 
77.55 
69.73 
83.37 
78.49 
82.20 
95.27 

101.53 
88.12 
92.27 
95.22 
81.75 
79.02 
79.86 
76.19 
78.44 
95.24 
74.75 
80.00 

108.28 
94.79 

108.17 
86.32 
75.27 
79.39 
74.49 
79.59 
83.28 
88.85 
83.41 



Oct. 

1962 



74.00 
56.22 
66.92 
65.49 
79.17 
84.80 
76.55 
78.37 
83.12 
88.71 

81.63 



61.02 
82.45 
67.86 
61.90 
65.75 

100.70 
70.70 
69.03 
88.40 
76.88 
67.18 
80.67 
76.32 
80.04 
91.71 
98.77 
84.96 
90.78 
93.72 
81.55 
77.01 
76.80 
72.88 
77.41 
92.25 
74.51 
77.46 

105.23 
92.87 

100. 15 
82.78 
72.90 
76.66 
73.03 
77.58 
81.46 
86.79 
80.17 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



73 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949=100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 

Note: Information for other industries is given in Employment and Payrolls 



Industry 



Employment 


Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 


Oct. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Oct. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


1963 


1963 


1962 


1963 


1963 


1962 








$ 


$ 


$ 


115.5 


116.7 


116.1 


103.52 


103.21 


99.65 


127.9 


129.3 


129.3 


104.63 


104.18 


100.78 


65.3 


64.6 


68.8 


85.52 


84.76 


82.88 


186.2 


189.5 


185.4 


110.86 


110.33 


106.95 


82.0 


81.7 


82.7 


107.71 


108.60 


105.15 


39.5 


38.6 


39.2 


82.56 


83.89 


80.37 


255.1 


257.4 


260.5 


123.59 


123.71 


120.38 


157.3 


162.3 


154.7 


93.06 


91.78 


86.75 


119.3 


120.3 


115.9 


87.45 


86.71 


84.34 


124.4 


124.5 


119.7 


94.62 


94.13 


91.47 


114.9 


116.8 


112.6 


80.94 


80.09 


77.99 


122.4 


130.7 


121.7 


75.14 


72.70 


72.27 


137.7 


138.2 


137.6 


86.24 


84.65 


83.53 


143.8 


203.1 


139.9 


58.49 


55.69 


56.48 


96.3 


96.6 


98.8 


86.47 


85.52 


82.41 


111.8 


112.4 


112.8 


73.09 


73.44 


69.57 


98.1 


96.4 


97.7 


106.62 


105.87 


103.03 


79.2 


79.5 


81.0 


88.74 


88.77 


86.55 


112.1 


106.6 


110.1 


90.48 


92.11 


89.75 


89.3 


89.6 


89.7 


58.96 


59.43 


56.76 


93.8 


95.0 


95.8 


56.66 


57.43 


54.00 


80.9 


79.8 


78.5 


63.82 


63.77 


62.86 


87.0 


86.4 


83.5 


70.73 


70.21 


67.42 


75.8 


75.2 


74.6 


68.62 


68.41 


64.02 


67.0 


66.3 


62.8 


64.75 


64.29 


63.00 


99.4 


99.0 


93.5 


77.46 


76.50 


73.94 


98.4 


98.9 


94.8 


55.30 


55.09 


52.74 


102.6 


102.3 


99.0 


53.90 


53.88 


51.66 


107.6 


109.7 


100.3 


56.53 


56.86 


53.40 


76.3 


75.8 


76.4 


55.27 


54.48 


54.69 


114.2 


116.2 


109.9 


75.43 


75.78 


73.30 


116.3 


119.5 


111.3 


77.29 


77.18 


74.99 


125.3 


124.9 


120.7 


73.87 


75.03 


72.33 


82.0 


82.3 


81.4 


66.72 


67.58 


64.49 


129.4 


130.8 


128.2 


102.49 


102.33 


99.61 


129.0 


130.4 


128.7 


110.39 


110.33 


107.85 


130.3 


131.2 


127.1 


83.72 


83.26 


79.63 


127.4 


127.5 


126.5 


94.61 


94.73 


90.96 


115.7 


116.1 


112.4 


98.53 


98.90 


96.35 


69.6 


65.2 


62.0 


100.97 


101.03 


93.80 


150.7 


150.9 


159.2 


101.96 


102.16 


98.80 


117.9 


116.8 


111.4 


85.96 


86.58 


84.68 


108.5 


108.8 


110.8 


88.02 


87.84 


84.18 


103.2 


103.6 


95.9 


93.79 


93.06 


91.31 


135.7 


136.6 


131.5 


94.81 


95.47 


92.56 


132.5 


133.9 


126.0 


111.88 


113.25 


113.02 


118.9 


121.1 


119.6 


94.89 


95.08 


92.61 


119.8 


119.3 


111.5 


98.28 


99.35 


95.74 


121.0 


118.4 


113.4 


104.06 


102.11 


98.52 


238.9 


234.7 


239.2 


105.97 


102.85 


98.26 


135.4 


131.0 


116.8 


121.77 


117.79 


115.52 


138.5 


133.5 


120.9 


99.85 


99.55 


96.63 


57.5 


56.5 


55.7 


89.64 


89.70 


84.46 


142.9 


143.7 


146.5 


93.62 


93.43 


91.32 


128.2 


129.4 


123.0 


98.49 


98.05 


96.03 


145.1 


148.5 


144.1 


95.77 


94.26 


93.22 


109.9 


110.6 


102.8 


94.98 


94.79 


91.91 


137.7 


139.0 


132.3 


108.00 


107.87 


105.20 


157.0 


156.9 


153.2 


92.91 


92.75 


90.58 


116.1 


116.0 


112.9 


100.24 


100.33 


98.62 


287.6 


283.9 


280.9 


88.79 


88.58 


87.08 


155.7 


156.6 


151.0 


94.09 


92.76 


89.65 


90.3 


91.6 


95.8 


82.36 


82.67 


79.47 


169.6 


170.3 


149.9 


89.05 


87.06 


86.87 


137.2 


139.6 


138.2 


130.17 


128.45 


121.49 


138.9 


141.6 


140.2 


131.57 


129.63 


122.61 


136.5 


136.7 


131.3 


102.86 


102.37 


99.57 


126.5 


126.1 


123.1 


91.07 


91.07 


87.88 


155.6 


157.8 


143.9 


116.79 


114.03 


113.53 


134.3 


134.3 


130.5 


101.72 


101.67 


98.83 


161.8 


159.6 


154.1 


75.99 


75.60 


72.85 


138.5 


143.2 


137.6 


94.12 


94.48 


88.21 


138.7 


141.4 


134.5 


101.24 


101.54 


95.43 


138.3 


146.2 


142.5 


82.42 


83.25 


76.99 


148.6 


148.2 


141.5 


90.45 


90.19 


86.60 


171.3 


175.2 


157.7 


59.43 


58.87 


57.92 


147.6 


152.9 


135.7 


45.64 


45.15 


44.09 


139.8 


140.0 


132.7 


52.79 


52.76 


50.72 


139.3 


130.3 


125.4 


84.67 


84.22 


81.63 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Mens clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial machinery 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Other chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



74 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



TABLE CM.— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING, BY PROVINCE 

(Hourly Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings DBS 

Note: Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Average Hours Worked 



October September October 
1963 1963 1962 



Average Hourly Earnings* 



October 
1963 



September 
1963 



October 
1962 



Newfoundland 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta (includes Northwest Territories) 

British Columbia (includes Yukon Ter- 
ritory) 



39.3 
41.1 
41.2 
42.3 
41.5 
40.7 



38.0 



39.8 
40.9 
40.6 
42.4 
41.5 
40.6 
38.7 
39.4 

37.5 



38.1 
40.9 
41.0 
42.3 
41.5 
40.2 
38.9 
40.0 

37.9 



$ 
1.72 
1.69 
1.64 
1.77 
2.06 
1.80 
2.02 
2.02 

2.39 



$ 
1.70 
1.67 
1.62 
1.76 
2.04 
1.80 
2.02 
2.01 

2.37 



1.60 
1.70 
1.99 
1.76 
1.98 
1.99 

2.29 



"Includes shift differential, premium pay for overtime, pay for paid holidays, pay for paid sick leave if paid through 
payroll but not if paid under insurance plan, incentive bonus but not annual bonus. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



75 



TABLE C-5-HOURS AND EARNINGS, BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



[ndustry 



Mining 

Metal inininc 

Cold ' 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Crain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leat her products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

*Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

*Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, Industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

"Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and appli- 
ances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

* Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Professional and scientific equipment 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

*Durable manufactured goods industries. 



Average Weekly 

Hours 



Oct. 

1963 



42.6 

42.5 
43.7 
42.1 
41.7 
42.9 
39.6 
43.9 
41.3 
41.8 
40.9 
40.6 
41.3 
40.8 
43.0 
40.8 
41.7 
39.3 
37.7 
42.4 
40.4 
40.0 
41.3 
43.3 
42.8 
43.0 
44.0 
39.2 
38.7 
37.3 
42.5 
41.6 
40.5 
43.8 
43.2 
41.9 
41.9 
41.9 
38.9 
41.6 
39.7 
43.3 
42.5 
42.2 
42.1 
42.0 
40.2 
41.2 
42.5 
42.1 
42.5 
43.6 
42.2 
40.2 
40.7 
41.2 
42.5 
42.3 
40.4 
41.2 
41.2 
40.5 

41.2 
42.8 
41.2 
44.4 
43.2 
41.0 
42.6 
41.3 
39.8 
41.6 
41.9 
41.8 
42.6 
41.9 
43.9 
44.8 
37.7 
37.3 
40.5 



Sept. 
1963 



42.6 

42.3 
43.1 
42.0 
42.5 
44.3 
39.5 
43.9 
41.3 
41.8 
40.8 
40.2 
40.7 
41.1 
42.3 
40.8 
40.3 
40.0 
37.8 
42.2 
41.0 
40.9 
41.3 
43.1 
42.7 
43.0 
43.7 
39.1 
38.9 
37.4 
42.0 
41.9 
40.6 
44.7 
43.5 
42.0 
42.0 
42.0 
39.0 
41.7 
40.1 
43.0 
42.6 
42.1 
41.8 
42.4 
40.4 
41.7 
42.7 
41.9 
41.5 
43.5 
42.4 
40.2 
41.1 
41.1 
41.8 
42.3 
40.4 
41.4 
41.4 
40.9 

41.2 
43.4 
41.2 
43.9 
42.9 
40.3 
41.8 
41.0 
39.9 
40.7 
41.8 
40.9 
43.1 
42.3 
44.5 
44.7 
37.5 
37.1 
40.5 



Oct. 

1962 



42.3 

42.2 
43.7 
41.7 
41.6 
42.9 
39.6 
43.2 
41.3 
41.9 
40.8 
40.3 
41.1 
39.2 
41.3 
41.0 
42.7 
38.9 
40.2 
43.3 
40.5 
39.8 
42.3 
42.9 
41.2 
43.3 
44.2 
39.2 
38.8 
37.1 
42.6 
41.7 
40.5 
44.2 
42.7 
41.7 
41.8 
41.6 
38.9 
41.9 
37.3 
43.5 
43.6 
42.1 
42.2 
42.7 
41.2 
42.0 
42.4 
41.7 
41.1 
44.2 
42.3 
39.2 
41.0 
41.4 
42.7 
41.8 
40.5 
41.5 
42.1 
41.1 

40.2 
43.0 
41.4 
43.7 
42.9 
41.1 
41.3 
41.2 
40.2 
41.7 
42.1 
40.7 
41.7 
41.4 
42.3 
43.9 
37.9 
37.6 
40.3 



Average Hourly 
Earnings 



Oct. 

1963 



% 
2.24 

2.32 
1.82 
2.51 
2.12 
1.90 
2.54 
2.05 
1.96 
2.13 
1.79 
1.68 
1.99 
1.28 
1.91 
1.64 
2.24 
2.47 
2.18 
2.01 
1.34 
1.30 
1.43 
1.49 
1.52 
1.38 
1.60 
1.29 
1.28 
1.39 
1.19 
1.73 
1.84 
1.58 
1.44 
2.31 
2.50 
1.83 
2.41 
2.26 
2.36 
2.20 
1.88 
1.94 
2.14 
2.13 
2.68 
2.16 
2.20 
2.34 
2.30 
2.62 
2.23 
2.18 
2.27 
2.23 
2.01 
2.14 
2.50 
1.97 
2.22 
1.76 

2.02 
2.19 
1.88 
2.01 
1.79 
2.05 
2.80 
2.20 
1.72 
2.56 
1.58 
1.98 
2.16 
2.36 
1.80 
2.04 
1.17 
1.14 
1.10 



Sept. 
1963 



$ 
2.24 

2.33 
1.82 
2.51 
2.11 
1.87 
2.54 
2.05 
1.94 
2.12 
1.78 
1.64 
1.98 
1.24 
1.90 
1.64 
2.23 
2.46 
2.18 
2.05 
1.34 
1.29 
1.43 
1.48 
1.52 
1.37 
1.59 
1.29 
1.28 
1.39 
1.18 
1.73 
1.84 
1.58 
1.43 
2.30 
2.49 
1.82 
2.42 
2.26 
2.33 
2.23 
1.89 
1.93 
2.13 
2.13 
2.70 
2.17 
2.23 
2.31 
2.25 
2.56 
2.24 
2.19 
2.25 
2.23 
2.01 
2.12 
2.50 
1.97 
2.22 
1.75 

2.02 
2.22 
1.87 
1.99 
1.80 
2.02 
2.78 
2.19 
1.71 
2.53 
1.58 
1.96 
2.16 
2.36 
1.80 
2.03 
1.16 
1.13 
1.09 



Oct. 

1962 



$ 
2.18 

2.26 
1.77 
2.45 
2.09 
1.84 
2.52 
1.97 
1.89 
2.05 
1.73 
1.61 
1.92 
1.23 
1.83 
1.54 
2.18 
2.38 
2.00 
1.96 
1.30 
1.25 
1.40 
1.43 
1.46 
1.33 
1.52 
1.22 
1.22 
1.30 
1.15 
1.67 
1.78 
1.52 
1.39 
2.26 
2.44 
1.75 
2.32 
2.19 
2.20 
2.17 
1.82 
1.87 
2.08 
2.05 
2.64 
2.07 
2.14 
2.24 
2.16 
2.49 
2.16 
2.10 
2.21 
2.16 
1.93 
2.07 
2.43 
1.91 
2.14 
1.71 

1.95 
2.17 
1.81 
1.93 
1.72 
1.95 
2.66 
2.11 
1.65 
2.44 
1.52 
1.87 
2.07 
2.25 
1.73 
1.98 
1.12 
1.08 
1.06 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Oct. 

1953 



$ 
95.51 

98.73 
79.54 

105.39 
88.42 
81.25 

100.54 
90.39 
80.93 
88.98 
73.24 
68.19 
82.07 
52.24 
82.18 
66.78 
93.24 
97.23 
82.21 
85.18 
54.25 
51.94 
59.21 
64.55 
65.06 
59.12 
70.42 
50.49 
49.69 
51.80 
50.61 
72.03 
74.63 
69.20 
62.05 
96.77 

104.43 
76.55 
93.59 
93.84 
93.95 
95.20 
79.96 
81.75 
90.19 
89.58 

107.63 
89.00 
93.29 
98.29 
97.68 

114.35 
94.17 
87.S5 
92.35 
92.10 
85.35 
90.41 

101.23 
81.11 
91.42 
71.25 

83.19 
93.63 
77.32 
89.12 
77.52 
83.87 

119.31 
90.91 
68.33 

106.36 
66.25 
82.73 
92.18 
98.90 
79.16 
91.53 
44.08 
42.56 
44.49 



Sept. 
1963 



$ 
95.45 

98.52 
78.26 

105.44 
89.40 
82.65 

100.29 
89.84 
80.29 
88.71 
72.44 
65.72 
80.43 
51.12 
80.26 
67.06 
89.79 
98.27 
82.15 
86.54 
54.87 
53.01 
59.01 
64.00 
64.79 
58.77 
69.30 
50.27 
49.81 
52.09 
49.68 
72.53 
74.72 
70.63 
62.47 
96.79 

104.50 
76.40 
94.37 
94.42 
93.46 
95.93 
80.31 
81.29 
89.25 
90.32 

109.03 
90.55 
95.05 
96.95 
93.22 

1 1 1 . 42 
95.11 
88.05 
92.32 
91.51 
83.97 
89.75 

101.01 
81.40 
91.98 
71.70 

83.06 
96.23 
76.81 
87.50 
77.03 
81.64 

116.16 
89.96 
68.43 

102.87 
65.98 
80.32 
92.90 
99.73 
80.08 
90.70 
43.56 
41.96 
44.20 



76 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE C-6 EARNINGS AND HOIKS OF HOURLY RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Houra and Hourly Earnings, DHS 



Period 



Monthly Average 1958 
Monthly Average 1959 
Monthly Average 1960 
Monthly Average 1961 
Monthly Average 1962 

Last Pay Period in: 
1962— October 

November 

December* 

1963— January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September* 

Octoberf 



Hours 

Worked 

Per Week 



40.2 
40.7 
40.4 
40.6 
40.7 



41.3 
41.2 
37.3 

40.7 
40.7 
40.9 
41.0 
41.2 
40.9 
40.7 
40.9 
41.3 
41.3 



Average 
Weekly 
Earnings 



1 . 66 
1.72 
1.78 
1.83 
1.88 



1.89 
1.90 
1.94 

1.92 
1.93 
1.93 
1.95 
1.95 
1.94 
1.93 
1.93 
1.94 
1.96 



A\ Crage 

Weekly 

Wages 



66.77 
70.16 
71.96 
74.27 
76.55 



77.96 
78.09 
72.34 

78.26 
78.45 
79.01 
80.05 
80.25 
79.64 
78.38 
78.82 
80.29 
80.93 



Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 



Current 
Dollars 



160.0 
168.1 
172.4 
177.9 
183.4 



187.1 
173.3 

187.5 

187.9 
189.3 
191.8 
192.3 
190.8 
187.8 
188.8 
192.4 
193.9 



1949 
I >ollars 



127.7 
132.8 
134.5 
137.7 
140.1 



141.6 
141.8 
131.3 

141.9 
142.3 
143.1 
145.0 
144.8 
142.9 
140.2 
141.6 
144.0 
144.7 



Note: — The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wa^es in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. 

*Revised. 

fPreliminnry. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



77 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

Statistics presented in the following tables relate to registrations for employment and 
vacancies notified by employers at NES offices. These data are derived from reports 
prepared in National Employment Service offices and processed in the Unemployment 
Insurance Section, D.B.S. See also Technical Note, page 91. 

TABLE D-l— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Period 



Unfilled Vacancies* 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



End of: 

December 1958. . . 

December 1959... 

December 1960... 

December 1961... 

December 1962... 

January 1963. . . 

February 1963. . . 

March 1963... 

April 1963... 

May 1963... 

June 1963... 

July 1963... 

August 1963... 

September 1963... 

October 1963. . . 

November 1963(1) 

December 1963(1) 



8,643 
9,097 
9,859 
11,402 

14,281 

13,419 
13,412 
16,085 
24,675 
22,865 
23,271 
22,720 
25,610 
24,950 
24,210 
30,090 
18,913 



8,549 
9,779 
7,996 
10,866 

13,638 

12,532 
13,930 
16,459 
20,458 
21,723 
21,726 
19,096 
23,933 
22,037 
20,861 
22,737 
15,351 



17,192 
18,876 
17,855 
22,268 

27,919 

25,951 
27,342 
32,544 
45,133 
44,588 
44,997 
41,816 
49,543 
46,987 
45,071 
52,827 
34,264 



562,257 
522,206 
570,789 
478,470 

473,575 

579,205 
591,207 
584,889 
502,327 
341,869 
261,541 
241,035 
208,509 
187,793 
219,966 
285,688 
432,390 



158,163 
157,962 
163,893 
136,566 

137,429 

163,880 
163,864 
158,307 
149,907 
130,084 
127,631 
122,350 
106,482 
99,162 
106,320 
117,689 
131,532 



720,420 
680,168 
734,682 
615,036 

611,004 

743,085 
755,071 
743,196 
652,234 
471,953 
389,172 
363,385 
314,991 
286,955 
326,286 
403,377 
563,922 



(1) Latest figures subject to revision. 

•Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-2— REGISTRATIONS RECEIVED, VACANCIES NOTIFIED AND 

PLACEMENTS EFFECTED DURING YEAR 1959-1962 AND DURING 

MONTH, NOVEMBER 1962-NOVEMBER 1963 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Year and Month 



Registrations Received 



Male 



Female 



Vacancies Notified 



Male 



Female 



Placements Effected 



Male 



Female 



1959— Year 

1960— Year 

1961— Year 

1962— Year 

1962— November. . 

1962— December. . . 

1963— January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November G> 



2,753,997 

3,046,572 

3,125,195 

3,177,423 

321,696 

338,121 

331,104 
211,442 
209.852 
210,392 
215,307 
210.727 
235,602 
198,464 
208,088 
R240.358 
279,655 



1,037,536 
1,107,427 
1,106,790 
1,171,111 
113,014 
94,533 

111,102 
75,073 
74,346 
81,258 
90,643 
96,469 

110,746 

94,109 

93,497 

R99.236 

102,499 



753,904 

724,098 

836,534 

1,010,365 

86,859 

58,253 

.56,086 
47,295 
54,427 
77,524 
100,832 
77,847 
86,824 
87,258 
99,517 
92,448 
90,258 



421,927 

404,824 

469,119 

544,795 

43,840 

40,470 

35,963 
31,852 
35,090 
39,149 
45,049 
43,687 
50,519 
54,999 
48,816 
44, 154 
39,410 



661,872 

641,872 

748,790 

897,285 

74,957 

57,541 

46,669 
39,378 
42,942 
58,986 
88,778 
67,482 
73,561 
70,874 
87.392 
75,313 
73,086 



324,201 

316,428 

371,072 

438,471 

33,481 

39,613 

28,117 
23,755 
24,990 
26.378 
32,272 
34,041 
41,398 
41,013 
38,693 
30,894 
27,230 



(^Preliminary — Subject to revision. 
R-Revised. 



78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE D-3— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED, BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX, 
DURING NOVEMBER 1963d) 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Industry Group 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change 

from 

November 

1962 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except clothing) 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries. . . 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment 

Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

Public Utility Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

Government Service 

Recreation Service 

Business Service 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



2,073 
2,930 

563 

320 
144 
21 
32 



11,948 

1,247 

9 

119 

195 

450 

397 

1,621 

757 

442 

2,269 

2,103 

490 

481 

447 

30 

364 

527 

10,291 

6,831 
3,460 

6,559 

6,029 
453 

77 

197 

8,281 
3,044 
5,237 

427 

29,827 

628 
24,287 

317 
1,159 
3,436 



298 
23 

55 

14 

20 

1 

1 

19 

6,254 

1,019 

30 

95 

300 

314 

1,555 

201 

329 

484 

334 

239 

158 

406 

59 

9 

232 

490 

153 

81 

72 

270 

134 
29 

107 

43 

6,071 

1,039 
5,032 

779 

13,284 

1,181 

2,593 

147 

639 

8,724 



2,371 
2,943 

618 

334 
164 
22 
33 
65 

18,202 

2,266 

39 

214 

495 

764 

1,952 

1,822 

1,086 

926 

2,603 

2,342 

648 

887 

506 

39 

596 

1,017 

10,444 

6,912 
3,532 

6,829 

6,163 

482 
184 

240 

14,352 

4,083 
10,269 

1,206 

43,111 

1,809 

26,880 

464 

1,798 
12,160 



-4,068 

- 62 

- 140 

- 36 

- 31 

- 62 

- 13 
+ 2 

—2,518 

- 502 

- 264 
+ 59 

- 149 

- 70 

- 243 

- 4 
+ 78 

- 229 

- 387 

- 208 
+ 34 

- 291 

- 90 

- 9 
+ 20 

- 263 

—3,204 

-2,432 

- 772 

-3,511 

-3,324 

- 179 

- 8 

- 48 

- 949 

- 104 

- 845 

- 118 

+6,496 

- 261 
+9,366 

- 47 

- 409 
-2,153 



73,086 



27,230 



100,316 



-8,122 



(^Preliminary — subject to revision. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



79 



TABLE D-t 



REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY OCCUPATION AND 
BY SEX, AS AT NOVEMBER 29, 19630) 



i Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission.) 



Occupational Group 



Professional and Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Persona] and Domestic Service Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Fo )d and kindred products (incl. tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Sri me. clay and glass products 

Metahvorking 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications and public utility 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metahvorking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

Grand total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



7,960 
17,193 

7,558 

31,722 

1,487 

6,591 

115,601 

1,466 

2,557 

9,498 

1,087 

832 

320 

11,258 

2.175 

378 

1,421 

31,737 

21,717 

554 

4,807 

18,001 

2,488 

5,305 

97,576 

3,537 

9,866 

4,353 

49,888 

29,932 



285,688 



Female 



1,927 

42,214 

12,933 

24,444 

16 

330 

14,719 
394 

8,927 
135 
407 
801 

25 
762 
874 

20 



1,426 
635 
209 
12 

21,106 

5,826 

309 

449 



14,522 



117,689 



Total 



59,407 

20,491 

56,166 

1,503 

6,921 

130,320 

1,860 

11,484 

9,633 

1,494 

1,633 

345 

12,020 

3,049 

398 

1,421 

31,741 

21,805 

554 

6,233 

18,636 

2,697 

5,317 

118,682 
9,363 

10.175 

4,802 

49,888 

44,454 



403,377 



(^Preliminary — subject to revision. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 7964 



TABLE D-5— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, 

AT NOVEMBER 29, 1963 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Office 



Newfoundland 

Corner Brook 

Grand Falls 

St. John's 

Prince Edward Island. 

Charlottetown 

Summerside 

Nova Scotia 

Amherst 

Bridgewater 

Halifax 

Inverness 

Kentville 

Liverpool 

New Glasgow 

Springhill 

Sydney 

Sydney Mines 

Truro 

Yarmouth 

New Brunswick 

Bathurst 

Campbellton 

Edmunds ton 

Fredericton 

Minto 

Moncton< 2 > 

Newcastle 

Saint John 

St. Stephen 

Sussex 

Woodstock 

Quebec 

Alma 

Asbestos 

Baie Comeau 

Beauharnois 

Buckingham 

Causapscal 

Chandler 

Chicoutimi 

Cowansville 

Dolbeau 

Drummondville 

Farnham 

Forestville 

Gaspe 

Granby 

Hull 

Joliette 

Jonquiere 

Lachute 

Lac Megantic 

La Malbaie 

La Tuque 

Levis 

Louiseville 

Magog 

Maniwaki 

Matane 

Mont-Laurier 

Montmagny 

Montreal 

New Richmond 

Port Alfred 

Quebec 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup 

Roberval 

Rouyn 

Ste. Agathe des Monts 
Ste. Anne de Bellevue . 

Ste. Therese 

St. Hyacinthe 

St. Jean 

St. Jerome 

Sept-tles 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 



Registrations 


(O 


Previous 




Year 


Nov. 29, 


Nov. 30, 


1963 


1962 


12,427 


14,060 


3,081 


2,950 


1 , 323 


1,528 


8,023 


9,582 


1,915 


2,568 


1,175 


1,612 


740 


956 


16,819 


19,804 


664 


783 


716 


941 


5,448 


5,718 


202 


413 


1,344 


1,526 


366 


481 


1,889 


1,970 


663 


871 


2,512 


3,523 


635 


954 


1,212 


1,190 


1,168 


1,434 


15,524 


19,814 


2,025 


2,619 


1,276 


1,453 


917 


1,394 


1,274 


1,642 


227 


307 


3,693 


5,109 


1,167 


1,653 


2,570 


2,945 


1,260 


997 


341 


483 


774 


1,212 


128,401 


139,181 


1,572 


1,872 


416 


645 


677 


834 


869 


846 


719 


796 


1,365 


1,178 


1,076 


1,343 


1,664 


2,275 


319 


323 


1,036 


1,026 


1,613 


1,804 


440 


478 


330 


436 


667 


893 


1,558 


1,949 


2,978 


3,454 


2,634 


3,029 


2,250 


2,764 


593 


855 


844 


772 


609 


1,004 


581 


806 


2,997 


1,945 


642 


754 


483 


550 


539 


495 


823 


1,298 


602 


738 


1,227 


1,196 


47,273 


51,427 


941 


1,070 


489 


842 


10,692 


9,743 


1,846 


2,269 


2,831 


2,719 


809 


1,101 


2,023 


2,549 


433 


597 


730 


.802 


1,748 


2,004 


1,338 


1,351 


1,657 


1,850 


1,491 


1,380 


1,378 


1,625 


3,024 


3,590 


3,472 


3,966 



Registrations 



Office 



Quebec— Concluded 

Sorel 

Thetford Mines. . 
Trois-Rivieres.. ■ 

Vald'Or 

Valleyfield 

Victoria ville 

Ville St. Georges 

Ontario 

Arnprior 

Barrie 

Belleville 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brock ville 

Carleton Place... 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Cornwall . . . : 

Elliot Lake 

Fort Erie 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Hawkesbury 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake . . . 

Kitchener 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

London 

Long Branch 

Midland 

Napanee 

New Liskeard.. . . 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Oakville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Colborne. . . . 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines. . . . 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. . 

Simcoe 

Smiths Falls 

Stratford 

Sturgeon Falls. . . . 

Sudbury 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodstock 




121 



438 

'228 

1,021 

1,352 

716 

1,022 

1,486 

432 

305 

1,259 

675 

578 

2,321 

321 

711 

500 

1,671 

749 

205 

337 

1,071 

9.295 

562 

653 

658 

1,657 



,274 
,596 
885 
307 
,285 
393 
,341 
300 
,330 
856 
454 
359 
,965 
563 
,730 
,840 
683 
425 
326 
746 
,859 
351 
,365 
,298 
623 
491 
504 
,630 
,453 
,329 
584 



1,530 
1,375 
4,241 
1,402 
1,766 
1,983 
1,641 



2,295 

1,581 

579 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73306-3—6 



• JANUARY 1964 



81 



TABLE D-&-REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, 
AT NOVEMBER 29, 1963— Concluded 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


Nov. 29, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Nov. 30, 
1962 


0) 

Nov. 29, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Nov. 30, 
1962 




17,640 

1,512 

1,017 

170 

657 

318 

13,966 

11,343 

208 

195 

911 

877 

1,600 

2,786 

2,835 

431 

252 

1,148 

26,271 

376 
8,455 

372 
11,816 

295 

865 
1,922 
1,019 
1,151 


22,377 

1,659 

1,159 

177 

917 

419 

18,046 

14,357 

291 

286 

1,146 

917 

2,437 

3,225 

3,420 

629 

314 

1,692 

27,697 

383 
9,477 

370 
11,897 

446 

747 
2,210 
1,139 
1,028 


British Columbia 


51,699 

1,751 
846 
645 

1,178 
620 

1,203 
801 
120 

1,032 
942 
643 

7,773 

1,138 
698 

2,161 

1,198 


55,419 

1,653 










978 


Flin Flon . . 




862 






1,173 


The Pas 




845 






1,249 






850 






141 






933 






1,144 






740 


North Battleford 




8,112 






1,071 






716 






2,632 






1,432 






381 






668 

601 

22,216 

1,183 

3,845 

437 

403,377 

285,688 
117,689 


866 




Trail 


696 


Alberta 




23,416 






1,357 






3,642 






530 




Canada 






456,756 








328,801 








Red Deer 


127,955 









(^Preliminary subject to revision. 

< 2 >Includes 205 registrations reported by the Magdalen Islands local office. 

•Effective September 28, 1963 the area served by the Princeton local office is served by the Kamloops and Penticton 
local offices. 



82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 






E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment insurance statistics are concerned with numbers of persons covered by 
insurance and claimants for benefit at Unemployment Insurance Commission local 
offices. The data are compiled in the Unemployment Insurance Section, DBS from 
information supplied by the UIC. For further information regarding the nature of the 
data see Technical Note, page 86. 

TABLE E-l— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



End of: 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants 


1963— September 


4,028,000 
4,125,000 
4,078,000 
4,068,000 
3,996,000 
4,173,000 
4,242,000 
4,264,000 
4,259,000 

4,223,000 
4,110,000 
4,009,000 
3,998,000 


3,841,700 
3,932,500 
3,859,000 
3,847,700 
3,725,100 
3,607,100 
3,556,700 
3,543,500 
3,555,900 

3,631,000 

3,735,800 
3,764,900 
3,800,200 


186,300 




192,500 


July 


219,000 




220,300 




270,900 




565,900 




685,300 




720,500 




703,100 


1962— December 


592,000 




374,200 




244,100 




197,800 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



83 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 

NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, 

OCTOBER 31, 1963 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



Province and Sex 



Total 
claimants 



Number of weeks on claim 
(based on 20 per cent sample) 



1-4 



5-13 



14-26 



27 or 
more* 



Total 
claimants 



September 
30, 1963 



October 
31, 1962 



Canada 

Male 

Female 

Newfoundland 

Male 

Female 

Prince Edward Island 

Male 

Female 

Nova Scotia 

Male 

Female 

New Brunswick 

Male 

Female 

Quebec 

Male 

Female 

Ontario 

Male 

Female 

Manitoba 

Male 

Female 

Saskatchewan 

Male 

Female 

Alberta 

Male 

Female 

British Columbia 

Male 

Female , 



218,866 
143,553 
75,313 



112,809 
81,164 
31,645 



57,756 
34,972 

22,784 



29,394 
16,100 
13,294 



18,907 
11,317 
7,590 



186.261 
117,024 
69,237 



244,140 
165,316 

78,824 



5,809 
4,803 
1,006 

774 
487 
287 

9,662 
7,045 
2,617 

8,768 
6,244 
2,524 

69,817 
47,685 
22,132 

69,843 
42,324 
27,519 

7,928 
4,554 
3,374 

4,276 
2,345 
1,931 

13,290 
8,891 
4,399 

28,699 
19,175 
9,524 



3,064 

2,674 

390 

341 

263 

78 

4,224 
3,338 



4,357 
3,221 
1,136 

35,739 

26,548 

9,191 

35,321 
23,820 
11,501 

4,197 
2,377 
1,820 

2,024 

1,271 

753 

7,051 
5,347 
1,704 

16,491 
12,305 
4,186 



1,491 
1,228 



223 
90 
133 



,791 
,902 



2,328 

1,547 

781 

19,105 
12,525 



18,326 
9,995 
8,331 

1,775 
967 



1,278 
601 
677 

3,536 
2,059 
1,477 

6,903 
4,058 
2,845 



798 
592 
206 

121 
69 
52 

1,647 

1,113 

534 

1,323 
953 
370 

9,304 
5,194 
4,110 

9,467 
4,683 
4,784 

1,128 
650 
478 

646 
288 
358 



903 



3,171 
1,655 
1,516 



456 
309 
147 



65 
24 

1,000 
692 
308 

760 
523 
237 

5,669 
3,418 
2,251 

6,729 
3.826 
2,903 



560 
268 

328 
185 
143 

914 
582 
332 

,134 
,157 

977 



4,053 

3,085 

968 

703 
413 

290 



5,997 
2,469 

7,495 
5,245 
2,250 

60,592 
40,366 
20,226 

63,161 
37,260 
25,901 

6,592 
3.498 
3,094 

3,450 
1,551 
1,899 

10,041 
6,037 
4,004 

21,708 
13,572 
8,136 



6,063 

5,232 

831 



593 

287 

12,526 
9,812 
2,714 

10,242 
7,969 
2,273 

73,359 
51,038 
22,321 

78,959 
49,967 
28,992 

11,314 
7,129 
4,185 

5,941 
3,603 
2,338 

13,676 
8,804 
4,872 

31,180 
21,169 
10,011 



•The bulk of the cases in this group were on claim from 27-39 weeks. 
Note: Values less than 50 subject to relatively large sampling variability. 



84 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT, BY PROVINCE, 

OCTOBER 1963 

Soubce: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 





Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending 
at End of Month 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




3,159 

387 

4,608 

4,435 

39,663 

41,544 

4,531 

2,261 

7,895 

17,736 


2,130 

268 

2,909 

2,880 

24,584 

26,096 

3,053 

1,673 

5,102 

10,995 


1,029 

119 

1,699 

1,555 

15,079 

15,448 

1,478 

588 

2,793 

6,741 


2,836 

308 

4,290 

3,947 

36,923 

39,792 

4,052 

1,999 

7,364 

15,864 


1,853 

215 

2,897 

2,695 

25,972 

27,466 

2,528 

1,183 

5,002 

10,744 


983 

93 

1,393 

1,252 

10,951 

12,326 

1,524 

816 

2,362 

5,120 


1,144 




161 




1,471 




1,519 




13,536 




13,489 




1,376 




765 




2,741 


British Columbia (incl. Yukon Territory) 


5,319 


Total, Canada, October 1963 


126,219 
92,892 
150,444 


79,690 
57,884 
95,524 


46,529 
35,008 
54,920 


117,375 
88,625 
131,265 


80,555 
61,183 
91,890 


36,820 
27,442 
39,375 


41,521 


Total, Canada, September 1963 

Total, Canada, October 1962 


32,677 
50,067 







*In addition, revised claims received numbered 34,035. 

fin addition, 35,012 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 3,089 were special requests not granted and 2,553 
appeals by claimants. There were 7,209 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



TABLE E-4— BENEFIT PAYMENTS, BY PROVINCE, OCTOBER 1963 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



Province 


Weeks 
Paid* 


Amount of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 




14,749 

2,483 

26,405 

23,881 

195,242 

200, 192 

21,298 

11,628 

31,711 

67,430 


328,072 




48,499 




562,310 




513,468 
4,641,072 
4,727,434 








483,255 
254,793 




Alberta 


774,241 




1,656,306 






Total, Canada, October 1963 


595,019 
532,124 
672,646 


13,989,450 


Total, Canada, September 1963 


12,527,626 
15,753,741 


Total, Canada, October 1962 







'"Weeks paid" represents the total of complete and partial weeks of benefit paid during the month. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



85 



Technical Note to "E" Tables 



Under the Unemployment Insurance Act 
contact between the claimant and the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission is 
made through a network of local offices. The 
statistics in Tables E-2 to E-4 relate mainly 
to local office claim operations. 

Upon separation from employment, a 
person wishing to file a claim for benefit 
applies to the nearest local office of the 
Commission in person or by mail. An ap- 
plication for employment is taken by the 
Employment Branch of the local office and, 
if a suitable vacancy exists, a referral is 
made. If suitable employment is not avail- 
able, a claim for benefit is taken by the 
Insurance Branch. 

If the person applying for benefit has had 
no previous entitlement established, an 
initial claim will be taken and entitlement 
computed, otherwise a renewal claim will 
be filed. Initial and renewal claims thus con- 
stitute an advance notice by a claimant that 
he wishes to draw benefit. In some cases 
where employment is found immediately, 
however, the claimant may not return to 
prove unemployment. 

The total of initial and renewal claims 
(Table E-3) thus approximates the number 
of new separations from insured employ- 
ment during a month. To the extent that 
an initial claim is taken from a person who 
has exhausted his benefit and seeks re-estab- 
lishment of further credits, the total 
would, however, constitute an overstatement 
of the volume of new separations. 

Claims in the category "entitled to bene- 
fit" include initial claims established on 
which no disqualification was imposed, and 
renewal claims allowed, no disqualification. 
Claims "not entitled to benefit" consist of 
failures on initial claims due to insufficient 
contributions, and, in addition, disqualifica- 



tions imposed on either initial or renewal 
claims. Claims not completely processed at 
the end of a month are shown as pending. 

Claimants are required to report weekly, 
except postal claimants, who may report 
every two weeks. Data on claimants cur- 
rently reporting to local offices are obtained 
from a count of individual unemployment 
registers in the current file at the month- 
end (Table E-2). Once a claim is taken, the 
document on which the record of current 
activity is maintained is placed in the cur- 
rent file and becomes dormant only after 
the scheduled reporting pattern has been 
broken twice in succession. The count of 
weeks of proved insured unemployment is 
begun again simultaneously with a new 
renewal claim and with initial claims, 
except those representing re-computation of 
additional credits. In these latter cases, the 
count is cumulated from the claim taken at 
the time the employment terminated. 

Information on payments (Table E-4) is 
provided by Treasury offices of the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission and relates 
to payments made during a month. In some 
cases, however, the compensated unemploy- 
ment would have occurred in a prior month. 
Data cover partial as well as complete weeks 
of unemployment. 

Estimates of the insured population 
(Table E-l) are based on a count of persons 
either working in insured employment or 
on claim at June 1 each year. Monthly 
estimates are based on the June count of 
persons employed projected, by industry, 
using employment indexes from Employ- 
ment and Payrolls (Employment Section, 
Labour Division, D.B.S.). To these employ- 
ment data are added the number of claim- 
ants reported at month end, as described 
above. 



86 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



F — Prices 

TABLE F-1-TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

1957 Weighted 

(1949 = 100) 

Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Total 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Transpor- 
tation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 


1959— Year 


127.2 

128.4 

129.2 

130.7 

131.9 

132.0 
132.1 
132.1 
132.3 
132.3 
132.8 
133.5 
133.9 
133.4 
133.6 
134.0 
134.2 


122.2 

122.6 

124.0 

126.2 

127.8 

129.0 
129.4 
128.9 
128.9 
128.3 
129.7 
132.5 
133.2 
131.3 
130.4 
130.8 
131.4 


131.5 

132.9 

133.2 

134.8 

135.7 

135.9 
135.9 
136.0 
136.0 
136.0 
136.0 
135.9 
136.3 
136.5 
136.6 
136.9 
137.0 


109.7 
111.0 

112.5 

113.5 

115.8 

114.7 
114.8 
115.6 
115.7 
115.6 
116.0 
115.7 
115.9 
116.1 
118.3 
118.7 
118.9 


140.5 

141.1 

140.6 

140.4 

140.2 

139.8 
139.6 
139.6 
139.2 
140.6 
140.3 
140.7 
141.0 
141.1 
141.2 
141.2 
140.6 


151.0 

154.8 

155.3 

158.3 

159.8 

159.8 
159.9 
159.9 
162.1 
162.6 
162.7 
162.6 
162.8 
162.7 
163.8 
164.8 
165.4 


144.4 

145.6 

146.1 

147.3 

148.2 

148.6 
148.6 
148.6 
148.0 
148.8 
149.3 
. 148.8 
148.8 
149.1 
150.5 
151.0 
151.4 


113.8 


1960— Year 


115.8 


1961— Year 


116.3 


1962— Year 


117.8 


1962 — December 


117.8 


1963— January 


117.8 




118.0 




118.0 




117.9 




117.8 




117.8 


July 


118.2 




118.1 




118.1 




118.1 




118.5 




118.5 







TABLE F-2— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA 
AT THE BEGINNING OF NOVEMBER 1963 

(1949 = 100) 





All Items 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Trans- 
portation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 





Novem- 
ber 
1962 


October 
1963 


Novem- 
ber 
1963 


(DSt. John's, Nfld.. 


118.1 
130.9 
131.4 
132.0 
132.7 
133.2 
130.1 
128.0 
127.4 
130.6 


120.3 
131.2 
133.0 
133.4 
134.7 
135.0 
130.6 
128.6 
127.7 
131.8 


120.8 
131.4 
133.3 
133.9 
134.5 
135.2 
131.2 
128.7 
127.7 
131.8 


117.7 
125.6 
129.6 
136.5 
130.2 
128.5 
130.5 
127.4 
123.6 
129.7 


115.8 
133.0 
132.1 
135.2 
136.7 
140.0 
128.0 
126.5. 
126.8 
134.6 


113.5 
128.5 
124.3 
111.4 
125.1 
123.6 
124.6 
129.4 
126.9 
121.3 


123.5 
137.2 
142.4 
159.8 
155.4 
136.7 
134.4 
135.7 
129.1 
140.1 


160.3 
166.1 
187.2 
171.4 
170.1 
161.6 
179.4 
147.1 
168.8 
151.1 


153.5 
166.9 
153.4 
145.1 
143.2 
189.9 
140.6 
148.4 
146.6 
150.1 


101.1 
124.3 




124.5 




121.7 


Ottawa 


123.8 
121.3 




125.5 


Saskatoon-Regina. . 
Edmonton-Calgary 


119.4 
119.4 
120.9 







N.B. Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

(DSt. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



87 



G — Strikes and Lockouts 

Statistical information on work stoppages in Canada is compiled by the Economics 
and Research Branch of the Department of Labour on the basis of reports from the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission. The first three tables in this section cover strikes 
and lockouts involving six or more workers and lasting at least one working day, and 
strikes and lockouts lasting less than one day or involving fewer than six workers but 
exceeding a total of nine man-days. The number of workers involved includes all workers 
reported on strike or locked out, whether or not they all belonged to the unions directly 
involved in the disputes leading to work stoppages. Workers indirectly affected, such as 
those laid off as a result of a work stoppage, are not included. For further notes on 
the series see page 954, October 1963 issue. 

TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1958-1963 





Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 


Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 


Month or Year 


Strikes and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in Man-Days 


Man- Days 


Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 


1958 


251 
201 
268 
272 
290 

29 
14 

9 
22 
18 
25 
28 
40 
27 
28 
30 
49 
12 


259 
216 
274 
287 
311 

47 
28 

24 
37 
32 
42 
44 
63 
61 
55 
63 
81 
44 


111,475 
95,120 
49,408 
97,959 
74,332 

9,525 
3,565 

4,559 
7,002 
5,207 
8,562 
6,214 
7,302 
17,101 
11,597 
9,583 
24,861 
6,193 


2,816,850 
2,226,890 
738,700 
1,335,080 
1,417,900 

75,270 
55,110 

79,780 
75,280 
34,080 
47,180 
30,300 
78,400 

181,030 
73,340 
86,320 

138,980 
51,020 


0.25 


1959 


0.19 


I960 


0.06 


1961 


0.11 


1962 


0.11 


1962 — November 


0.06 




0.05 


*1963 — January 


0.07 




0.07 




0.03 




0.05 


May 


0.02 




0.07 


July 


0.15 




0.06 




0.08 




0.11 




0.05 







'Preliminary. 



TABLE G-2— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1963, BY INDUSTRY 

(Preliminary) 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1963, BY JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Strikes 
and 

Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Days 












3 
18 
8 
3 
9 


204 
2,348 

505 
2,505 

337 


2,150 




36,730 




1,720 


Transpn. & utilities 

Trade 


2,530 
4,030 








3 


294 


3,860 














All industries 


44 


6,193 


51,020 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Days 










Prince Edward Island . . 


1 


11 


260 


New Brunswick 


1 

10 
23 


147 
1,641 
1,647 


3,090 
28,370 




13,580 








1 
1 
5 
2 


90 

32 

121 

2,504 


270 




670 


British Columbia 


2,270 
2,510 






All jurisdictions. . . . 


44 


6,193 


51,020 



88 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1963 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 
Employer 
Location 


Union 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in 
Man-Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Nov. 


Accu- 
mulated 


Result 


Mines 

Metal 

Canadian Malartic Mines, 

Malartic, Que. 


Steelworkers Loc. 4826 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


110 


170 


450 


Oct. 29 
Nov. 4 


Wages ~ Wage increase 12^ an 
hr. immediately, 3fi July 20, 
1964. 


Manufacturing 
Food and Beverages 
Viau Limitee, 
Montreal, Que. 


CNTU 


524 


11,000 


24,100 


Sep. 26 


Wages ~ 


Rubber 

Seiberling Rubber, 

Toronto, Ont. 


Rubber Workers Loc. 118 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


411 


5,750 


8,630 


Oct. 23 

Nov. 21 


Wages, welfare benefits~4ji 
an hr. increase June 15, 1963, 
U an hr. June 15, 1964; 2£ an 
hr. to S.U.B., life insurance 
and welfare plan. 


Knitting Mills 
Regent Knitting Mills 
St. Jerdme, Que. 


Textile Workers' Union 
Loc. 1475 (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC) 


245 


5,150 


32,610 


Aug. 13 


Wages, working conditions~ 


Wood 

Bellerive Veneer & Plywoods, 

Mont-Laurier, Que. 


CNTU 


215 


3,630 


12,720 


Aug. 30 


Wages, hours, working con- 
ditions ~ 


Paper 

Kimberly-Clark Canada, 

St-Hyacinthe, Que. 


Pulp and Paper Mill 
Workers Loc. 933 (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 


179 


3,760 


5,550 


Oct. 19 


Wages ~ 


Bathurst Containers, 
Hamilton, Ont. 


Woodworkers Loc. 2-69 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


251 


500 


500 


Nov. 4 
Nov. 6 


Dissatisfaction with incen- 
tive program introduced by 
company ~ Return of workers 
pending discussions with 
company. 


Electrical Products 
Crouse-Hinds, 
Toronto, Ont. 


U.E. (Ind.) 


111 


1,440 


1,440 


Nov. 13 
Nov. 29 


Wages in a first agreement ~ 
Return of workers. 


Construction 
Kitchener-Waterloo Sheet 

Metal Contractors' Assoc, 
Kitchener- Water loo area, Ont. 


Sheet Metal Workers Loc. 
562 (AFL-CIO/CLC) 


100 


100 


500 


Oct. 25 
Nov. 4 


Non-union workers in other 
trades ~ Pickets withdrawn, 
work resumed. 


Standard Steel, 
Boston Creek, Ont. 


Structural Iron Workers 
Loc. 786 (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC) 


226 


450 


450 


Nov. 26 
Nov. 29 


Payment for travelling time 
~ Return of workers pending 
negotiations. 


Transpn. & Utilities 
Transportation 
Shipping Federation of 
. British Columbia, 
Various ports, B.C. 


Longshoremen and Ware- 
housemen (CLC) 


2,500 


2,500 


2,500 


Nov. 4 
Nov. 5 


Delay in signing new agree- 
ment ~ Return of workers 
pending settlement. 


Trade 

Irving Refining, 

East Saint John, N.B. 


Oil Workers Loc. 9-691 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


147 
(29) 


3,090 


4,880 


Sep. 16 


Wages ~ 


Service 

Health and Welfare 
; Hdpital Ste. Justine, 
Montreal, Que. 


Service Employees' Fed- 
eration (CNTU) 


235 


2,600 


5.290 


Oct. 16 

Nov. 16 


Shortage of staff, increased 
work load, wages ~ Study of 
nursing standards by Pro- 
vincial Government Council. 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7964 



89 



H — Industrial Accidents 

TABLE H-l— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA, BY TYPE OF ACCIDENT 
AND INDUSTRY, DURING THE THIRD QUARTER OF 1963 

(Preliminary) 



Type of Accident 


2 

3 

"3 
u 

M 
< 


3 

'So 

O 
Hi 


"B. 

D. 

2 
H 

C 
C3 
M 
3 


M 

C 

'>, 

t- 
03 

-a 

a 

c3 
M 
4 C 

'c 


M 

a 

o 

*3 

c 
a 


3 
_o 



3 

CO 

a 


O 


2 § 
5 g 

il 

11 


m 

.2 

3 


2 


V 


3 

c3 

3 


> 


H3 

'3 

J 


c 


13 
































Struck by: 


1 








i 
"5' 

6 
6 

2 
14 

1 

"5 


2 
3 
11 

7 
10 

2 
13 

2 

1 
6 
1 


1 
3 
3 
6 

18 


1 










6 








2 
8 
4 
3 






1 

3 

1 

19 

1 
7 
2 




fl 






14 
4 


"i 

3 


"2 


1 
2 
4 




45 


Caught in, on or between machinery, vehicles, etc 


17 

2 


48 
fi7 


Falls and slips: 


5 




1 

1 


2 


4 


3 
3 

7 


6 
1 


2 






52 


Conflagrations, temperature extremes and explosions. . . . 
Inhalation, absorptions, asphyxiation and industrial 


3 




13 






8 




4 






1 


7 






1 

1 
1 

37 




7!4 










? 












2 
42 










3 


Total 


26 


20 


8 


30 


58 


39 


12 


10 




?8?,* 







*Of this total, 174 fatalities were reported by the various provincial Workmen's Compensation Boards and the 
Board of Transport Commissioners; details of the remaining 108 were obtained from the other sources. The number of 
fatalities that occur during a quarter is usually greater than shown, as not all fatalities are reported in time for inclu- 
sion in the quarterly tables. Fatalities not recorded in the quarterly tables are included in the annual tables appearing 
in the May issue. 



TABLE H-2— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES, BY INDUSTRY AND PROVINCE, 
DURING THE THIRD QUARTER OF 1963 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Nfld. 


P.E.I. 


N.S. 


N.B. 


Que. 


Ont. 


Man. 


Sask. 


Alta. 


B.C. 


Yukon 

and 
N.W.T. 


Total 


Agriculture 








3 
1 
2 

1 
4 
2 

1 


■""4"" 


16 

6 


1 


...... 


3 


3 

8 
5 
7 
12 
12 

10 

1 
1 


........ 


26 










20 








1 
1 


8 








2 
7 
6 

4 
1 
2 


9 

15 
26 

14 
5 
5 


2 
1 
3 

1 
1 


....... 

2 

1 


7 
3 
4 

1 

1 
2 


30 








42 




1 
1 




1 

5 
2 


58 


Transportation, Storage and 
Communication 


39 


Public Utilities 


12 


Trade 






10 


Finance 
























1 


2 


18 


1 


2 


2 


7 


4 


37 






































Total 


2 




10 


15 


28 


114 


10 


9 


23 


66 


5 


282* 







•See footnote to Table H-l. 



90 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



Technical Note to "D" Tables 



Tables D-l to D-5 present selected statistics 
emanating from operations of National Employ- 
ment Offices. These statistics, therefore, must 
be interpreted in the light of National Employ- 
ment Service policy, operations, and reporting 
methods. Within this context, these operational 
statistics can provide useful information on 
labour supply and demand, historically and 
at specific points in time, by occupations, 
industries and local office areas. 

Each National Employment Office is engaged 
in: (1) receiving applications for employ- 
ment, assessing and recording the qualifica- 
tions, interests, and aptitudes of the applicants, 
and assigning the occupational classifications 
which represent the applicant's highest levels 
of skill; (2) receiving orders for workers from 
employers, recording the employers' specifica- 
tions for job vacancies, and classifying the 
orders occupational^ and according to the 
industrial activity of the employers; (3) 
selecting from among available applicants the 
persons whose qualifications most closely 
approximate the specifications on the em- 
ployers' orders; and (4) initiating clearance 
procedure to inform other National Employ- 
ment Offices when suitable applicants are not 
available locally to fill employers' requirements. 
(There are numerous other related activities 
engaged in by National Employment Offices, 
but these are not the subject of the operational 
statistics under discussion.) 

The industrial classification system used to 
classify employers and employers' orders is 
the Standard Industrial Classification of the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

The occupational classification system used 
for classifying employers' orders and applica- 
tions for employment is that of the Dictionary 
of Occupational Titles, published by the 
United States Employment Service. This system 
is based solely on the needs of the personnel 
selection process, and as a result is dissimilar 
from other occupational groupings such as 
occur in the census or in various salary 
evaluation systems. 

The two basic statistical reports of the 
National Employment Service reflect these 
operations and systems of classification. 

One of these statistical reports is produced 
from a physical count of the local office files 
of orders and applications, and shows by occu- 
pational groups the number of unfilled vacan- 
cies and registrations for employment that are 
active on the last working day of each month. 
Certain exclusions are made in this count, how- 
ever. Total unfilled vacancies specifically 
exclude "deferred vacancies," i.e., those 
vacancies that are listed with the local offices 



but for which employers are not yet ready to 
accept referrals or confirm hiring. Total 
registrations for employment exclude those per- 
sons who are known to be employed but are 
seeking different work, those persons who also 
have applications registered with other local 
offices, those persons who are seeking part-time 
work only, those persons who have registered 
in advance of their availability for work, 
and a few other similar categories. Since 
registrations are retained on an active basis 
for 14 days, these totals will include some 
applicants who have found work on their 
own but have not so notified the local office. 
Month-end data taken from this report on 
unfilled vacancies and registrations for em- 
ployment are to be found in Tables D-l. D-4 
and D-5. With particular reference to Table 
D-5, it should be noted that the totals given 
for each office represent the whole area served 
by the office and not simply those in the city 
or town in which the office is located. 

The other basic statistical report contains 
monthly totals of certain National Employment 
Office operations, including such items as 
registrations received, vacancies notified, and 
placements effected, during the whole of the 
month reported. In this report, "registrations 
received" include the total number of 
registrations recorded during the month, and 
therefore differ considerably from "registrations 
for employment" taken from the other report, 
which deals only with selected registrations at a 
specific point in time. Vacancies notified and 
placements effected are recorded in this report 
by industry groups, but in the table published 
here, only placements effected are shown by 
industry groups. 

"Vacancies Notified" are the total number of 
job openings that have been listed by employers 
with National Employment Offices, and, as 
such, provide an indication of fluctuations in 
the demand for workers. "Placements Effected" 
are the number of confirmed placements made 
by the NES on the vacancies notified. As such, 
placements effected provide an indicator of 
the number of persons who have found employ- 
ment during the period. Placements effected 
include regular placements, casual placements 
(in jobs with an anticipated duration of six 
days or less), and transfer-out (placements 
involving the movement of workers from one 
local office area to another). 

Tables D-2 and D-3 contain data on registra- 
tions received, vacancies notifed and placements 
effected, and placements by industry, respec- 
tively, taken from the operational report cover- 
ing the whole of each month. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1964 



91 



AZETTE 



,|.*. M & 




*l*l 




Published Monthly by the 

EPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



CANADA 



AUTOMAT ION (page 99) 

Vol. LXIV No. 2 

FEBRUARY 28, 1964 



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(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 



R. M. Dyke 



Editor, French Edition 



Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 

by George Hunter, 

Manitoba Department 

of Industry and Commerce 



Vol. LXIV, No. 2 CONTENTS February 1964 

Department Today: Small Business Management Train- 
ing 94 

50 Years Ago This Month 95 

Notes of Current Interest 96 

Automation 99 

The Kaiser Steel-USW Long-Range Sharing Plan 101 

Labour Market Developments in Canada, 1963 105 

Employment and Unemployment, December 107 

Manpower Situation, 4th Quarter, 1963 108 

Latest Labour Statistics 115 

Vocational Rehabilitation of Older Disabled Persons 116 

Collective Bargaining Review: 

Collective Bargaining, 4th Quarter, 1963 118 

Major Settlements in 1963 120 

Collective Bargaining Scene 122 

Education and Training of Girls in Britain 125 

Teamwork in Industry 126 

Certification and Conciliation: 

Certification Proceedings 127 

Conciliation Proceedings 131 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 135 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 139 

Unemployment Insurance — NES: 

Monthly Report on Operation of the Act 148 

Monthly Report on Placement Operations 149 

Decisions of the Umpire 149 

Wage Schedules :. 152 

Price Indexes 156 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library... 157 

LABOUR STATISTICS 162 



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73933-4—1 



Department of Labour Today 



Small Business Management Training 

Federal-provincial small business management training program, 
formerly under Department of Trade and Commerce, now part of 
Technical and Vocational Training Branch of Labour Department 



Courses conducted under the federal- 
provincial Small Business Management 
Training Program are having a beneficial 
effect on the operations of small businesses. 
This was illustrated at a conference last 
month in Ottawa of the administrators of 
Small Business Management Training from 
six provinces and one international trade 
association. 

The meeting was called by the federal 
Department of Labour, and included 
representatives from British Columbia, 
Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Prince Ed- 
ward Island and Nova Scotia. 

It was shown that, as a result of federally 
supported business courses in local com- 
munities, many owners and operators of 
small businesses are changing their methods 
of keeping records, handling accounts re- 
ceivable, keeping inventory, determining 
prices, interpreting financial statements, 
buying, budgeting, and conducting sales 
promotion and other business operations. 

The courses, prepared by the Department 
of Labour and written by authorities in 
each aspect of small business management, 
include: retailing, management accounting, 
and marketing for small manufacturers. The 
courses have been organized in some 30 
local communities by boards of trade, serv- 
ice clubs, businessmen's and trade associa- 
tions, and have been attended by 1,000 
owners of small businesses. 

The program is administered provincially 
by Departments of Education, which 
arrange for instructors chosen from the 
ranks of business and professional men. 

The meeting was told that the business 
community is giving the program a great 
deal of support. The provincial admini- 
strators reported a heavy demand for 
courses throughout their respective prov- 
inces. A number of companies are stuying 
the program with a view to adapting it to 
the needs of their dealers, retail outlets and 
industrial salesmen. 

Speaking at the opening of the meeting, 
Dr. C. R. Ford, Director, Technical and 
Vocational Training Branch, Department 
of Labour, stressed the necessity for man- 
agement training, stating that the courses 
specifically designed for Canadian small 
business can be of great assistance to con- 
tinuing economic growth in all parts of 
Canada. 



Improved small business performance is 
a decided asset to the growth of Canada's 
economy at the rate necessary to provide 
a satisfactory level of employment and 
standard of living, he said. 

Dr. Ford said that every survey and 
analysis of small business, both in North 
America and Europe, has established that 
managerial shortcomings outweigh all other 
reasons for small business failure and poor 
performance. He added that the conclusion 
must be drawn that management training 
will improve this situation. 

The Small Business Management Train- 
ing Program was formerly under the 
Department of Trade and Commerce. Dur- 
ing December 1963, it was transferred to 
the Department of Labour, where it has 
become a division of the Technical and 
Vocational Training Branch. 

D.S. Conger, who was formerly chief of 
the Management Training Division in the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, where 
the Small Business Branch was first estab- 
lished in 1958, is in charge of the program. 

The program comes under the Technical 
and Vocational Training Assistance Act, and 
is eligible for financial support under Pro- 
gram 4 of the Technical and Vocational 
Training Agreement. The courses, which 
are given at the local community level, 
are sponsored by a local trade or business 
association, service club, board of education 
or other interested group. 

A local sponsoring committee works with 
a provincial superintendent to select the 
required courses and then assumes responsi- 
bility for conducting and administering the 
courses. The courses now available for 
sponsorship are: Accounting for Owners, 
Bookkeeping for Owners of Small Busi- 
nesses, Marketing for Manufacturers, and 
Retailing. 

Interested sponsoring groups may write to 
the Department of Education in the prov- 
inces of British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, 
Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia, to 
get in touch with the provincial adminstra- 
tor or superintendent of small business man- 
agement training. Further information is also 
available direct from the Small Business 
Management Training Division, Technical 
and Vocational Training Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour, Ottawa. 



94 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



From the Labour Gazette, February 1914 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Fourth annual convention of British Columbia Federation of 
Labour adopts resolution condemning "grossly biased attitude" 
of two judges in trials of striking Vancouver Island miners 



A resolution condemning the "grossly 
biased attitude on the bench" of a county 
court judge of the County of New West- 
minster and a judge of the British Colum- 
bia Supreme Court, in the trials of miners 
from Vancouver Island, was passed by the 
fourth annual convention of the British 
Columbia Federation of Labour, held in 
New Westminster on January 26 to 30, 
1914. 

The resolution referred to the judges' 
"browbeating of the counsel for the defence, 
[and] the unwarranted denunciation of the 
witnesses for the defence as liars and per- 
jurers" during the trial. It provided for the 
setting up of a special committee "to confer 
with the solicitors for the defence with a 
view to preparing charges against one or 
both judges; and that the said charges be 
sent to the Hon. R. L. Borden, M.P., Prime 
Minister of Canada; Hon. C. J. Doherty, 
M.P., Minister of Justice; H. H. Stevens, 
M.P., and J. D. Taylor, M.P., with a request 
for the impeachment of the said judges." 

The report of this convention in the 
Labour Gazette of February 1914 said 
that a large part of the President's report 
was "devoted to a review of the coal miners' 
strike on Vancouver Island and the efforts 
put forth on behalf of the miners in an 
endeavour to effect a settlement." The 
President's report severely criticized the 
provincial Government for sending militia 
and special constables into the strike district, 
and "the militia as an institution was con- 
demned," the report said. 

"Disappointment was expressed at the 
lack of co-operation between officials of 
Vancouver Trades and Labour Council and 
officials of the Federation in the protest 
entered by the latter body against the use 
of the militia in connection with the miners' 
strike." 

The report of the convention continued: 
"In submitting the question of a 48-hour 
strike as a protest of organized labour 
against the treatment accorded the striking 
miners on Vancouver Island, the executive 
committee put the question as follows: Tf 
you are willing to lay down your tools and 
leave your employment for a period of 48 
hours in order to make the most emphatic 
protest possible against the actions of the 
Government, you will say Yes; if, however, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73933-4:— U 



• FEBRUARY 1964 



you approve of the use of the militia in an 
attempt to defeat the workers, you will 
say No.' Of the 120 organizations asked to 
vote on this question, only 12 sent in 
returns, the votes cast being 670 in favour 
of strike and 270 against." 

Among the other resolutions passed by 
the convention were some that: 

— Favoured the absolute exclusion of all 
Asiatics from Canada; endorsed the move- 
ment to obtain equal suffrage for women; 
favoured legislation to secure minimum 
wage boards and an eight-hour day for fe- 
male workers; declared that "neither the 
name nor the funds of the British Columbia 
Federation of Labour shall be used to pro- 
mote the interests of any political party"; 
declared against military training in schools; 

— Favoured the shortening of hours of 
labour in mines to six hours per day, bank 
to bank, and to seven hours per day for 
all other classes of labour in British Colum- 
bia, with a minimum wage of $4 per day; 
favoured the abolition of private employ- 
ment agencies; favoured the payment of 
wages at least fortnightly and in cash; 
favoured the expiry of all trade agreements 
with employers on May 1; 

— Decided that no fraternal delegate 
would be sent to the next meeting of the 
Trades and Labour Congress of Canada; 
recommended that all affiliated unions 
should have a clause inserted in their con- 
stitutions prohibiting members from be- 
longing to any military organization; and 
favoured the expulsion of all Asiatics from 
the mines, and urged that further restrictions 
be placed on their employment. 

CPR Financial Statement 

The value of the assets of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, according to a special 
valuation just completed by officials of the 
company, was $846,000,000, this journal 
reported. These assets included "lands, mile- 
age, stations, rolling stocks, steamships and 
all property owned by the company." 

The railway itself was valued at $452,- 
320,780, and the 70 vessels of its steamship 
fleet at $23,049,283. The company owned 
2,052 locomotives. 

The company's total income for the year 
ended June 1, 1913 was $139,395,000, with 
operating expenses of $95,145,875. 



95 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Government Planning Labour Standards Legislation 



Revised labour standards for industries 
coming under federal jurisdiction were part 
of the new legislation involving his Depart- 
ment that the Government had in mind for 
1964, Hon. Allan MacEachen, Minister of 
Labour, told the Windsor Chamber of Com- 
merce last month. 

There was already legislation providing 
for minimum standards regarding wages, 
hours, holidays and vacations in most 
provinces, but there was an important gap 
here to be filled, Mr. MacEachen said. 

Safety Legislation 

The Government was considering legisla- 
tion on occupational safety. There was at 
present no federal legislation directed to- 
ward the prevention of accidents in the 
course of employment and the elimina- 
tion of industrial dangers to health in the 
various works, undertakings and businesses 
within federal jurisdiction. 

The purpose of the proposed law, the 
Minister said, was to require the institution 



of measures to protect the health and safety 
of employees with respect to matters that 
did not already come within the province 
of other federal departments. 

Unemployment 

After referring to the steps the Govern- 
ment had taken in 1963 to reduce unem- 
ployment or alleviate its effects, Mr. Mac- 
Eachen said that further action was being 
considered for 1964 to improve existing 
machinery for dealing with unemployment. 
He alluded particularly to contemplated 
legislative changes to the Unemployment 
Insurance Act and the operation of the 
National Employment Service as a result of 
proposals made by the Gill Committee. 

A careful review of these proposals, in- 
cluding those relating to changes in organ- 
ization directed toward fuller co-ordination 
and integration of the work of the NES 
with that of the Department of Labour, had 
been under way for some time, the Minister 
said. 



Economic Council of Canada Meets, Announces First Project 



Dr. John J. Deutsch, Chairman of the 
new Economic Council of Canada and 
former Vice-Principal of Queen's University, 
last month stated that the first project of 
the Council is to produce a report on 
Canada's medium- to long-term prospects 
and problems. The report is to be completed 
by the end of the year. 

Dr. Deutsch also announced that the 
nucleus of a research staff would be 
engaged almost immediately. Its task will 
be to initiate the studies that will form 
the basis for the long-range economic sur- 
vey to be prepared by the 2 8 -member 
Council (L.G., Jan., p. 4). 

Executive Committee 

An initial meeting of the Council 
approved the formation of an executive 
committee composed of: Dr. Deutsch; 
J. L. E. Couillard and Arthur J. R. Smith, the 
two permanent Directors of the Council; 
Roger Charbonneau, Director of the 
Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales; 
Robert Fowler, President of the Private 
Planning Association of Canada; Claude 
Jodoin, President of the Canadian Labour 
Congress; and David Kirk, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Canadian Federation of 
Agriculture. Mr. Couillard was also named 
Vice-Chairman of the Council. 



The Council also established four stand- 
ing committees to delve into economic 
growth, labour-management relations, pro- 
ductivity, problems of adjustment, and 
industrial research and technology. 

Advice on Policies 

Hon. Maurice Lamontagne, the then 
President of the Privy Council, responsible 
to Parliament for the Economic Council of 
Canada, in addressing the meeting said 
the Government intended to ask the Council 
from time to time "for specific advice on 
policies having long-range implications." 
He also pointed out there would be no 
attempt by the Government to influence the 
Council. 

The Chairman emphasized that the 
Council was not intended to engage in 
economic planning that would be imposed 
on the various sectors of the country but 
to develop a consistent and logical set of 
policy recommendations that would pro- 
mote the best performance of the ecoonmy. 

Its goal is to seek a consensus among 
those responsible for making decisions in 
business, agriculture and government about 
the best way of promoting steady economic 
growth, he said. 



96 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



29,000 Apply for House-Building 
Incentive in Plan's First Month 

At the beginning of last month, the De- 
partment of Labour had received some 
29,000 applications for the construction of 
winter-built houses under the Winter House 
Building Incentive Program (L.G., Oct. 
1963, p. 862). As the program ends on 
March 31, by which date construction must 
be completed if the houses are to qualify 
for the $500 incentive payment, the flow 
of applications had likely passed its peak 
by January 1. 

A tabulation of the first 27,796 applica- 
tions received showed that 190 were can- 
celled by the applicant and about 900 did 
not meet the required conditions regarding 
the amount of construction permitted before 
December 1, 1963. 

Of the remaining 26,678 applications, 
Quebec and Ontario had produced the 
most, with more than 8,000 each. Alberta 
was third, with 3,627 applications. Figures 
for other provinces were: Newfoundland 
180, Prince Edward Island 49, Nova Scotia 
336, New Brunswick 233, Manitoba 1,288, 
Saskatchewan 1,156, British Columbia 
2,678, and Yukon and Northwest Territories 
31. 

The 26,678 applications covered 2,433 
duplexes, 184 triplexes, 539 four-unit build- 
ings, and 23,522 single houses. Seventy per 
cent are being built with National Housing 
Act financing. 

It is estimated that construction under 
the applications approved up to the begin- 
ning of the year will require 95,000 workers 
on the construction sites during the four 
winter months, and another 115,000 workers 
in the industries that manufacture, trans- 
port and sell building materials. 

Winter Works Incentive Program 
Surpassing Last Year's 

By January 24, federal government con- 
tributions under the 1963-64 Municipal 
Winter Works Incentive Program were 
higher than in the comparable period of the 
previous season, although the number of 
applications received was lower. The con- 
solidation of applications by participating 
municipalities accounts for the higher con- 
tributions on a lower number of applica- 
tions. 

And both the estimated cost of projects 
during the period of the program and the 
estimated number of men to be hired 
reached new records by January 24. 

The estimated federal government share 
of direct payroll costs for the 1963-64 pro- 
gram had reached $42,477,000, compared 



with a cumulative total of $35,811,000 for 
the comparable week last year. 

Applications received in the 1963-64 pro- 
gram were 5,678; in the 1962-63 program 
at this date they numbered 5,917. Applica- 
tions accepted numbered 5,608 and 5,853, 
respectively. 

Participating local authorities totalled 
2,400 for the 1963-64 period ended Janu- 
ary 24, compared with 2,293 for the similar 
1962-63 period. 

In the week ended January 24 this year, 
the estimated cost of projects during the 
period of the program reached 233,300,000, 
and the estimated direct payroll cost, 
$80,530,000. The estimated number of men 
to be hired during the period of the pro- 
gram was placed at 126,013 and the number 
of man-days of work at 5,564,246. 

U.S. Teamsters Win Agreement 
On First Nation- Wide Contract 

The International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters and the United States trucking 
industry last month reached agreement on 
a nation-wide contract, their first national 
labour contract. 

The contract encompasses more than 
400,000 Teamster members and 400 locals 
in a single bargaining unit, and involves 
some 16,000 local and long-distance truck- 
ing companies. Only negotiations in the 
U.S. steel industry, which usually affect 
some 500,000 workers, cover a greater 
number of workers. 

Among main provisions of the three-year 
contract, expiring March 31, 1967, are: 

— An increase of 28 cents an hour in 
three annual stages. 

— An increase of $3.00 in weekly pay- 
ments to the medical-care fund, spread 
over the three-year period. 

— An increase in the weekly pension 
fund payments, of $1.00 on February 1, 
1964 and $1.00 on February 1, 1966. 

— Four weeks vacation after 16 instead 
of 18 years of service. 

— An additional 1-cent-an-hour increase 
on February 1, 1965 for employees earning 
less than $3.13 an hour. 

— A two-year "moratorium" on the 
annual cost-of-living pay increases (in 
recent years averaging 3 cents a year). 

CNTU Appoints Vice-President 

The executive of the Confederation of 
National Trade Unions has appointed Jean- 
Noel Godin a Vice-President to succeed 
Rene Gosselin, who has been named a 
member of the Quebec Labour Relations 
Board. Since June 1959, Mr. Godin had 
been president of the National Federation 
of Clothing Workers. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



97 



Labour Attache in Belgium Returns, 
Heads International Affairs Branch 

A. J. L. Mainwaring, formerly Canadian 
Labour Attache at Brussels, Belgium, last 
month became Director of the International 
Labour Affairs Branch of the Department 
of Labour, which was formerly the Inter- 
national Labour Organization Branch. He 
succeeds Paul Goulet, who is on retire- 
ment leave. 

Dr. R. M. Adams, formerly Head of the 
Labour-Management Division, Economics 
and Research Branch, has taken Mr. Main- 
waring's place in Brussels. 

Mr. Mainwaring was associated with the 
ILO on numerous occasions; he had attended 
seven sessions of the International Labour 
Conference by the time he was posted to 
Brussels in November 1958, and had repre- 
sented Canada at other ILO meetings in 
North America and Europe. 

Before his assignment to Brussels, Mr. 
Mainwaring was Head of the Labour- 
Management Division, Economics and 
Research Branch, and before that, Assistant 
Editor of the Labour Gazette. He had 
joined the Department in 1942. 

Dr. Robert McDonald Adams has been 
associated with the Economics and Research 
Branch since 1958, and has been chief of 
the Labour-Management Division of the 
Branch since 1960. 




John Mainwaring 



Demand Continues Strong 
For University Graduates 

University graduates continue to be in 
strong demand in Canada, although the 
number of students graduating increased 
by 17 per cent — from about 26,500 to 
31,000— between 1962 and 1963. In 1964, it 
is expected that the total number of those 
receiving degrees — Bachelor, Master or 
Doctorate — will approach the 37,000 mark. 

Starting salaries are also continuing their 
upward trend. 

These and additional data, together with 
descriptions of job prospects for graduates 
of the various courses, are given in Supply 
and Demand — University Graduates 1963- 
64, published last month by the Executive 
and Professional Division of the National 
Employment Service. 

Graduating classes may be expected to 
become larger in the coming years as the 
enrolments at Canadian universities and 
colleges continue to increase rapidly, the 
booklet points out. Full-time enrolment 
reached 141,388 students in 1962-63, repre- 
senting an increase of about 10 per cent 
over the previous year. If the same rate 
of increase continues in 1963-64, then some 
156,000 full-time students will be studying 
at institutions of higher learning throughout 
the country. 

Estimated monthly starting salaries 
offered to the 1963 graduates are based 
largely on rates paid by the larger national 
employers. For Bachelors, they range from 
$345 to $470; Masters, $451 to $490; and 
Doctors, $658 to $700 (figures for the 
latter two categories are not complete). 

Increases in starting salaries apply to 
nearly all courses, and range from 5 per 
cent for graduates in economics and politi- 
cal science to 10 per cent for graduates in 
mathematics. In the engineering profession, 
salaries are from 1.5 to 3.5 per cent higher 
than in the previous year, metallurgical 
engineering showing the largest increase. 

On the demand side, the booklet includes 
the following estimates: 

— About 9 per cent more social scientists 
will be needed in 1964; universities and col- 
leges will require 13 per cent more. 

— Some 7.8 per cent more economists will 
be required in 1964, with universities need- 
ing the largest number. 

— Each year there are potential openings 
for 1,500 agricultural science graduates but 
new graduates total less than half that 
number. 

— There is a particular demand for high 
school specialists in mathematics, science, 
home economics and commercial work. 

— Demand for engineers continues to be 
strong in industry, government and uni- 
versities. 



98 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



AUTOMATION 



Employer speaker at AFL-CIO convention says automation "our 
greatest domestic problem" and calls for total preoccupation 
of all — industry, labour and government — with ways to solve it 



"I am convinced that as a result of auto- 
mation, as a result of our new relationship 
to machines, the relationship of the worker 
to both management and his union will 
also have to change. 

"I am convinced that because the problem 
is so enormous, we have entered into an 
era in which we must court totally new 
ideas and totally new ways of approaching 
our problems — ideas and techniques that 
will be far removed from any approaches 
we have known before. 

"All such ideas should get fair hearings, 
no matter how outlandish they may seem. 
Our very salvation, in my opinion, depends 
on innovation — innovation and the co- 
operative will of us all." 

These words were spoken by an employer, 
John I. Snyder, Jr., President and Chairman 
of the Board of U.S. Industries, Inc., at the 
5th biennial convention of the AFL-CIO. 
Mr. Snyder is co-chairman with A. J. 
Hayes, President of the International 
Association of Machinists, of the American 
Foundation on Automation and Employ- 
ment, his company produces automation 
machines and the subject of his address was 
"Automation." 

Automation is "our greatest domestic 
problem," he said. "We need to become 
totally preoccupied with this problem — all 
of us in industry, labour and government — 
if we intend to solve it. 

"It seems to me there is no question that 
we have already entered upon a time which 
requires a far greater degree of whole- 
hearted co-operation between labour, man- 
agement and government than mankind has 
ever known before." He said the Automa- 
tion Foundation was a sign pointing in that 
direction, a sign that such co-operation was 
possible. 

Mr. Snyder began by saying that he did 
not agree that automation was an evil. 
(In his presidential address to the conven- 
tion, George Meany had said that automa- 
tion was a curse to society.) 

I believe automation is necessary for this 
nation today if we are to produce and sell 
goods in the face of world competition, and 
that ultimately it can do greater good for man- 
kind, relieving man of much drudgery he has 
had to perform before. 

I also believe, however, it is in the best 
interests of all businessmen to work hard to 
solve the very real and immediate human prob- 
lems that automation is creating. 



There is no question that automation is 
displacing workers, Mr. Snyder said. But 
there is some question about the rate at 
which machines are taking jobs away from 
men. Here he found fault with the con- 
clusion reached by the President's Council 
of Economic Advisers that unemployment 
in the industries most affected by automa- 
tion was less than projections of early figures 
had indicated (L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 1071). 

The formula used in the Automation 
Foundation — the over-all employment figure 
multiplied by the rate of increase of output 
per man-hour — showed that in the United 
States in 1962 more than 2i million jobs 
were lost to automation. "That would be 
51,000 jobs a week. To allow for a margin 
of error, we have maintained that automa- 
tion has been a major factor causing the 
loss of jobs at the rate of 40,000 a week." 

There was nothing sacred or exact about 
that figure, Mr. Snyder continued. But what 
he did regard as sacred was the necessity to 
face up to two "hard and brutal" truths: 
automation is here to stay, and automation 
is putting and for a long time to come will 
continue to put a lot of people out of work. 

And these people include both blue- 
collar and white-collar workers: book- 
keepers, clerk statisticians, and accountants 
who are rapidly being replaced by "sophisti- 
cated electronic brains." 

Yet the country as a whole remains singularly 
unaroused and I can't help but wonder why. Is 
it because today we have so many benefits that 
we did not have back in the Thirties- 
social security, welfare, unemployment com- 
pensations, and all the other desirable, neces- 
sary, and good benefits which we fought so 
hard to win? Is it because the unemployed 
aren't organized or represented by any spokes- 
men? The unemployed would make a pretty 
big union. 

Mr. Snyder said he was angry about the 
emergence of a whole series of delusions 
that are widely accepted and have "a deep 
tranquilizing effect on many men and wo- 
men who otherwise might help solve the 
human problems automation is creating." 
These delusions must be exposed as the 
fallacies they are, he said. 

Fallacy No. 1 was that automation really 
is not going to eliminate many jobs. "Auto- 
mation is indeed eliminating jobs," he said. 
Detroit is the centre of automation and is 
also one of the country's largest and most 
critical unemployment areas. He cited 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



99 



figures from a June 1963 survey that 
showed that employment in companies, in 
various industries, had dropped at least 5 
per cent and at most 43 per cent; but in 
almost all of the companies, productivity 
was up. 

In addition, automation has displaced 
people through "silent firings," which Mr. 
Snyder defined as workers who without 
automation would eventually have been 
hired for specific tasks that are now auto- 
mated. 

There are also those workers who lose their 
jobs through vertical integration due to auto- 
mation, as in the case of a company which 
formerly supplied a third of Ford's body parts. 
When Ford automated its stamping plants, no 
Ford employees were displaced, but 5,000 
employees of the body company were 
obliterated from the payroll. 

Fallacy No. 2 was that automation will 
create jobs, not only in the running of 
machines but also in the building and main- 
tenance of them. But experience has shown 
that after the initial "debugging" of auto- 
mated machines, they require very little 
maintenance; if this weren't so it wouldn't 
make economic sense to automate. And if 
the same number of workers replaced by 
automation were needed to build the 
machines, there would be no point in 
automating. 

Fallacy No. 3 was that all the people who 
lose their jobs to machines can be rapidly 
retrained and placed immediately in other 
jobs requiring higher skills. "Most of our 
experience so far refutes this claim," he said 
"Unfortunately, many of our workers appear 
to be simply not retrainable by present 
techniques. 

"You cannot force people into retraining, 
and after you retrain them you can't manu- 
facture jobs out of thin air. We have not 
yet discovered a satisfactory system for 
retraining and re-employing a significant 
number of workers." 

Here Mr. Snyder touched on another bar- 
rier to retraining. In the face of an "appall- 
ing" lack of teachers, we can't provide 
retraining by using traditional training 



methods; yet we cannot use modern 
machine teaching techniques unless people 
accept them. 

Fallacy No. 4 related to the Negro. The 
key issue in the Negro protest movement 
was jobs, and automation has played a role 
in aggravating this problem. There was a 
relationship between the "Second Industrial 
Revolution" and the "Second American 
Revolution." 

These "Four Fallacies of Automation" 
were serving as "deep sedation for those 
who either cannot or will not come for- 
ward to grapple with the human problems 
caused by automation. 

"It is much easier to look for proof that 
these problems do not exist than to admit 
their existence and move ahead toward a 
solution." 

What are the solutions? Is tax reduction 
a solution? Will collective bargaining pro- 
vide a solution? Will the shorter work week 
be the solution to the problems of automa- 
tion? 

Mr. Snyder was of the opinion that a 
tax cut can be a partial solution — "if it 
creates enough purchasing power to stimu- 
late enough additional production to stimu- 
late additional employment." 

He did not believe that collective bargain- 
ing can help solve the human problems 
created by automation but he did believe 
that the collective bargaining process will 
prove invaluable if it is employed with the 
kind of wisdom and vision that resulted in 
the Kaiser steel agreement (see page 101). 

The shorter work week, he believed, had 
merit as a solution "in the absence of other 
solutions, and only because of some long- 
term benefits that it may produce." He 
explained: a shorter work week means 
more leisure time, more leisure time re- 
quires means of constructively using it, 
constructive use of leisure time will require 
new leisure-time industries, and new lei- 
sure-time industries mean more total jobs. 

It was here that Mr. Snyder appealed for 
the total preoccupation of industry, labour 
and government with the problem of auto- 
mation. 



Shorter Work Week No Cure for Unemployment — Cornell 



A shorter work week with the same 
weekly pay will not necessarily mean more 
jobs, according to a study carried on at 
Cornell University. 

Labour leaders are asking for a shorter 
work week because they believe that it will 
solve, at least partially, the problem of un- 
employment, explains Marcia L. Green- 
baum, a former research assistant in 



Cornell's New York State School of In- 
dustrial and Labor Relations. 

Union leaders, she says, are convinced 
that automation is a major cause of un- 
employment and that a shorter work week 
is needed to spread a decreasing amount of 
available work among an increasing num- 
ber of workers. 



100 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



But both management and government 
argue that reduction in working hours with- 
out a reduction in pay is more likely to 
destroy jobs than to creat new ones. Union 
demands for the maintenance of take-home 
pay is the equivalent of a large wage in- 
crease, and higher labour costs may dis- 
courage hiring, she points out in a bulletin, 
"The Shorter Workweek," issued by the 
School. 

To maintain take-home pay will require 
a 14.3-per-cent wage increase, which will 
almost always means an increase in the 
firm's labour costs, says Miss Greenbaum. 
If a firm is in such a highly competitive 
industry that it cannot raise its prices, 
management may attempt to offset a wage 
increase, economists believe, by reducing 
the number of workers or by increasing the 
productivity of the present workers, she 
maintains. On the other hand, if the firm in- 
creases prices, lower sales and less produc- 
tion may result. 

In neither case, says Miss Greenbaum, 
does the employer have any incentive to 
hire more workers. In addition, some mar- 
ginal firms might be pushed completely out 
of existence. 

Management and government officials also 
contend the shorter work-week with the 
same pay will probably mean a drop in 
living standards. The 14.3-per-cent wage 
increase is almost five times more than the 
normal annual productivity increases of 3 
per cent. Productivity would have to in- 
crease as much as wages increase to pre- 
vent inflation, explains Miss Greenbaum. 
The workers' real wages would be less since 
rising prices would mean higher living costs. 

Union leaders hope also to induce em- 
ployers to hire more workers when they 
need additional help by demanding double- 



time instead of time-and-a-half for overtime 
work. In particular, says Miss Greenbaum, 
unions would like to see the 35-hour week 
lead to an extra shift of workers in many 
plants now working a single 40-hour shift. 
Miss Greenbaum thinks, however, that 
demand for the employer's product would 
have to increase substantially to make two 
shifts profitable. 

Employers' increased costs from a shorter 
work week could eventually be met by in- 
creased productivity and increased labour 
efficiency, but not all at once. "With an 
annual productivity gain of 2 to 3 per 
cent predicted for the next few years, it is 
unlikely that this rise can offset in one fell 
swoop the 14.3-per-cent initial wage in- 
crease and possible additional costs from 
overtime payments or extra shift arrange- 
ments," Miss Greenbaum says. 

Some side effects of a shorter work week 
might be an increase in "moonlighting" and 
an increase in the labour force of "second- 
ary workers" such as housewives and 
retired workers. 

There are other ways of decreasing hours 
of work, such as longer weekends, longer 
vacations and earlier retirement ages. Miss 
Greenbaum also mentions the sabbatic 
leaves that are being introduced for older 
workers. And the working life of younger 
people is being shortened by longer voca- 
tional training and other education, which 
postpone their entrance into the labour 
force. 

In the future, the standard 40-hour work 
week is likely to disappear, concludes Miss 
Greenbaum. But she believes that the reduc- 
tion in working hours will occur more 
gradually than many labour leaders might 
prefer and in far less dramatic forms than 
the sudden leap to a 35- or 32-hour week. 



The Long-Range Sharing Plan of 

Kaiser Steel, United Steelworkers 

Employment-stabilizing sharing plan agreed to by Kaiser Steel 
and United Steelworkers set a precedent for entire industry 



When the Kaiser Steel Corporation in the 
United States signed its employment- 
stabilizing Long-Range Sharing Plan with 
the United Steelworkers of America (L.G., 
Jan. 1963, p. 6), it set a precedent for the 
entire industry. 

Details of the plan, which came into effect 
on March 1, 1963, were explained during 
the Staff Training Conference of District 6, 
United Steelworkers of America, held in 
Niagara Falls, Ont., on November 24-29, 
by Marvin J. Miller, Assistant to the Presi- 



tHE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

73933-4—2 



FEBRUARY 7964 



dent of the USW. Mr. Miller is co-ordinator 
of the Human Relations Committee estab- 
lished under the United States steel in- 
dustry agreements with the USW in January 
1960 and is one of the three union repre- 
sentatives on the tripartite USW-Kaiser 
Steel Long-Range Committee, which devel- 
oped the plan now in effect at the company. 
The basic objective of the Long-Range 
Sharing Plan entered into by the Corpora- 
tion and two Steelworkers locals is to pro- 



101 



vide employment protection against tech- 
nological change. 

Among major provisions of the Long- 
Range Sharing Plan are: 

— Allocation of 32± per cent of the 
monthly savings resulting from increased 
productivity or material savings to the more 
than 4,000 employees affected by the plan. 
Subtractions are made from this share, 
until a certain adjustment is reached, for a 
company-maintained Wage and Benefit 
Reserve. 

— A guarantee of at least as much in 
wages and fringe benefits as employees of 
other steel companies. 

— An employment guarantee, made ef- 
fective through establishment of a plant- 
wide employment reserve. 

— A displacement differential to be paid 
to any employee affected in his job classi- 
fication by technological change. 

— A "short-week" payment to employees 
scheduled for a work week of less than 40 
hours (because of technological changes or 
new work methods) and who are available 
for 40 hours of work in a week. 

— Incentive provisions of the collective 
bargaining agreement continued in effect, 
but the company will not establish new in- 
centives, and terms of the plan in general 
are such as to facilitate the switch to the 
Long-Range Sharing Plan on the part of 
incentive employees. 

— A minimum sharing guarantee, involv- 
ing payments by the company into the em- 
ployees' gross share, provided that the appli- 
cation of this feature does not cause the 
total actual labour and material and supply 
cost for the year in question, including the 
employees' share, to exceed standard costs 
of production. 

— Grievance and arbitration provisions of 
the collective bargaining agreement between 
the company and the union remain in 
effect; grievances involving interpretation 
of the plan are referred to the Long-Range 
Committee, and if necessary, to the public 
members of this tripartite committee (which 
has public, union and company members) 
for final and binding arbitration. Unless 
changed or modified by the provisions of 
the plan, all existing agreements between 
the company and the union remain in 
effect. 

— Annual review and revision of the plan 
by the company and the union are provided 
for, and are to be undertaken in the 90-day 
period prior to each anniversary date. The 
plan may be terminated by either party 
upon four months notice to the other party, 
which must be served within the 12 months 
following the fourth anniversary date of 
the plan, and each four years thereafter. 



The terms of the plan also state that its 
provisions shall not be construed as requir- 
ing the company to hire new employees, 
and it reaffirms management's rights and 
responsibilities with respect to "such mat- 
ters as sales policies, purchasing policies, 
research projects, management compensa- 
tion, expansion of capacity and other 
similar areas." 

Long Range Sharing Plan 

The groundwork for the Kaiser-USW 
Long-Range Sharing Plan was laid on 
October 26, 1959, when an agreement 
between the two parties provided for the 
establishment of a tripartite committee. This 
committee was to formulate "a long-range 
plan for equitable sharing in the company's 
progress." After more than two years of 
study and discussion, the committee devel- 
oped a plan, which was accepted by David 
J. McDonald, President of the United Steel- 
workers of America, on behalf of the 
union, and by Edgar F. Kaiser, Chairman 
of the Board, Kaiser Steel Corporation, on 
behalf of the company. 

Employees' Share of Gains 

A basic total of 32£ per cent of the 
monthly savings resulting from increased 
productivity or material savings — savings 
resulting from technological changes, im- 
provements in labour performance, material 
and supply usage, and related factors — 
goes to the more than 4,000 employees 
affected by the plan. 

Gains from these improvements are meas- 
ured from the base point of the company's 
actual operations in the calendar year 1961, 
the standards and improvements in manu- 
facturing costs being in terms of appro- 
priately weighted manufacturing cost per 
finished ton of iron and steel produced. 

Detailed rules are set out for the calcula- 
tion of gains, and the extent to which 
capital expenditures are taken into account 
is defined. Capital expenditures for new 
processes or new equipment to increase 
capacity do not figure in the adjustment of 
the total dollar gains. Costs of certain addi- 
tions and improvements for reducing product 
cost, however, are used in the adjustment, 
but such adjustments continue only until 
an amount equal to the capital expenditure 
itself has been prorated, and this class of 
adjustment is made only for the months in 
which the projected cost reductions are 
achieved. Maintenance jobs of $300,000 or 
more are prorated over a 12-month period. 

Lump sumps paid out by the company to 
eliminate incentive plans and out-of-line 
differentials (see below) are translated 
monthly into a current labour cost. 



102 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



The employees' gross share of the gains 
are regarded as consisting of two parts. 
The first part consists of 32.5 per cent of 
the total net dollar gains as calculated under 
terms described above. Graduated, monthly 
amounts are subtracted from this share for 
incorporation into a Wage and Benefit 
Reserve established as part of the plan. 
These subtractions started with one fifth of 
one per cent during the first month. From 
the Wage and Benefit Reserve there is sub- 
tracted each month the total increase in 
employment costs resulting from wage and 
benefit increases according to the guarantee 
provision of the plan (see below). There 
are certain exceptions to the subtractions 
from the Reserve. 

The progression of the subtractions from 
the employees' gross share is adjusted in 
such a way and under specified terms such 
that, six months after the effective date of 
any increase in wages or benefits occasioned 
by industry adjustments, the net balance of 
the Wage and Benefit Reserve is zero. 

The second part of the employees' gross 
share of gains involves lump sums paid by 
the company to eliminate incentive plans 
and out-of-line differentials. 

The plan incorporates a detailed schedule 
for the distribution of gains under the 32.5- 
per-cent gross share, taking various group 
classifications into consideration (units elect- 
ing to remain on incentive are excluded). 

Employment Guarantee 

The plan incorporates an employment 
guarantee, which is made effective by 
setting up of a plant-wide employment 
reserve. This provision is designed to give 
protection against unemployment because 
of technological change and new or im- 
proved work methods. It also covers any 
other operational changes that do not result 
from a decrease in man-hour requirements 
because of a drop in finished steel produc- 
tion or a change in product or production 
requirements. 

An employee who would normally be 
laid off as a result of basic changes as above 
is accepted into the plant-wide employment 
reserve. Any necessary layoffs are to be 
made through the employment reserve, the 
size of which and other conditions attached 
to it also being defined. There is an em- 
ployment reserve for the production and 
maintenance employees and another for the 
clerical and technical employees. 

Payment of Displacement Differential 

An employee whose job classification is 
affected by a technological change or new 
or improved work methods, in that he 
would otherwise be promoted under exist- 
ing seniority arrangements to a higher job 



classification, or an employee whose job 
classification is lowered because of such 
changes, receives a displacement differential. 
Such payment is not included in the cal- 
culation of incentive earnings. 

Payment of the displacement differential 
to an employee ends after 52 weekly pay- 
ments, or as follows: on the date when he 
fills a vacancy for a permanent job of a 
class equal to or higher than the one for 
which the differential was paid; and 
alternatively, on the date when the em- 
ployee rejects or fails to accept promotion 
to a permanent job of a higher rating, and 
which he is able to fill. The maximum dura- 
tion of any displacement differential is 
three years from the date the particular 
change was instituted. Other governing 
conditions are included. 

Short Weeks Provision 

Employees who are scheduled for a work 
week of less than 40 hours and who are 
available for 40 hours of work in a week 
receive a "short-week" payment when they 
are employed for the shorter week as a 
result of technological changes or new work 
methods. The payments make up the differ- 
ence. All such short-week payments are 
deducted from the total dollar gains as 
calculated under the sharing plan. 

Status of Incentives 

Under the plan, all incentive provisions 
of the collective bargaining agreement 
between the USW and Kaiser Steel Corpo- 
ration continue in effect, but the following 
provisions should be noted: 

— No new incentives will be established 
by the company, nor will incentives be 
applied to employees not covered by such 
incentives on the date of the plan's becom- 
ing effective. 

— Temporary incentives in effect before 
introduction of the plan are settled as 
permanent incentives by agreement of the 
parties or by final and binding arbitration 
after 60 days from the date of the plan's 
installation. 

— Employees belonging to an incentive 
unit and who received incentive payments 
during the 13 -week period immediately pre- 
ceding a company offer made under an 
applicable clause of the plan can choose 
from various options, some involving 
lump-sum payments for elimination of an 
incentive plan and transfer to the Long- 
Range Sharing Plan. Employees on incentive 
may remain on that basis under prescribed 
conditions, and continuing incentive plans 
may be adjusted. 

The amounts that would have been pay- 
able to former employees under elimina- 
tion of an incentive by a lump-sum pay- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 

73933-4— 2£ 



103 



ment or a related choice, or to employees 
who came under adjusted incentives, are 
added to the employees' gross share. 

Payments under Minimum Guarantee 

A minimum guarantee concerning the 
employee's share is provided in the plan. 
It involves payments by the company into 
the first part of the employees gross share, 
with the provision that these payments do 
not cause the total actual labour and 
material and supply cost for the year in 
question, including the employee's share, 
to exceed standard costs of production. 

Payments under this provision come into 
play when the total actual labour cost — 
including the employee's gross share — is a 
smaller percentage of total labour and 
material and supply cost than the per- 
centage that standard labour cost was of the 
standard total cost. 

The minimum guarantee clauses of the 
plan also continue in effect the provision in 
the Supplemental Memorandum of Agree- 
ment by the two parties, dated March 9, 
1961, that states that any wage and bene- 
fit adjustments agreed to by the union 
and the basic steel producers shall be put 
into effect by the company. The total in- 
crease in employment costs resulting from 
this provision (with the exception of any 
industry wage or benefit increase effective 
within six months after the effective date 
of the plan), is subtracted from the Wage 
and Benefit Reserve for each month. If the 
Reserve is insufficient under these conditions, 
the company makes up the difference. 

Termination of Agreement 

The plan is subject to review and revision 
by the parties each year in the 90-day 
period preceding each anniversary date of 
the plan. Termination of the plan by either 
party is provided for, contingent upon four 
months notice to the other party, the 
notice to be served within the 12 months 
following the fourth anniversary date of 
the plan, and each four years thereafter. 

In case notice of termination is given by 
either party, the plan provides that the 
parties jointly determine the provisions for 



the period following the termination, giv- 
ing consideration to guidelines provided in 
the plan. Failure of the parties to agree 
within 60 days calls for referral of the mat- 
ter to the public members of the Long- 
range Committee. Following their review of 
the matter, the public members of the 
committee are authorized under the plan 
to take any one of a series of alternative 
steps, including mediation and recommenda- 
tions to the parties. 

If no subsequent agreement follows termi- 
nation of the plan, a strike or lockout may 
be resorted to. And in case of termina- 
tion, the entire amount in the Wage and 
Benefit Reserve is to be paid to the em- 
ployees on the same basis as provided for 
under the plan. 



A new Kaiser Steel-USW pact broadens 
extended vacation plan coverage to include 
almost all of the company's hourly work 
force. 

The basic steel contract, signed last year 
by other major steel producers (L.G., July 
1963, p. 549), provides that the senior 50 
per cent of hourly work forces receive a 
13 -week vacation with 13 weeks pay every 
five years. It also provides additional vaca- 
tion benefits for all workers, depending on 
the money available in the vacation fund 
set up by the contract. 

The new Kaiser agreement will give 
about 75 per cent of the company's hourly 
work force a 13 -week vacation with 14 
weeks pay every five years, and most of 
the remaining hourly employees a 7-week 
furlough with 8 weeks pay every five years. 

The extended vacation plan will not 
affect Kaiser costs because such benefits 
are paid out of a fund provided by the 
Long-Range Sharing Plan that went into 
effect March 1. Nor will the new vacation 
plan have any effect on the bonuses paid 
to workers under the sharing plan, since 
money for this is already being funded 
under a schedule of deductions from the 
gross amount of the employees' share of 
cost savings. These deductions precede bonus 
payments. 



First Director of U.S. Women's Bureau Dead at 91 

Miss Mary Anderson, Director of the Women's Bureau of the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor from its founding in 1920 until her retirement in 1944, died in Washington 
on January 29 at the age of 91. 

Miss Anderson spent 18 years on a stitching machine in a Chicago shoe factory, 
during which time she became President of Local 94 of the Boot and Shoe Workers 
Union, and then became an organizer for the National Women's Trade Union League. 
In World War I, she was called to Washington to work with the Women in Industry 
Service of the National Defence. When the Service became the Women's Bureau in 1920, 
she was made its director. 



104 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



Labour Market Developments in 1963 

Business expansion shows no sign of slowing down. Last year, 
production, employment and incomes rose substantially, prices 
rose only modestly. Expansion continues to be broadly based 



The current business expansion, which 
started early in 1961, has already lasted 
longer than most of the postwar periods of 
expansion. But there is little evidence to 
indicate any slowdown within the next few 
months. 

In fact, the recovery seems to have picked 
up some momentum during the latter part 
of the last year. The major indicators reveal 
a substantial strengthening during the final 
months from the brief hesitancy apparent 
earlier in 1963. 

During the past year, the economy 
showed a strong advance. Production, em- 
ployment and incomes rose substantially; 
prices showed a fairly modest increase. The 
expansion continued to be broadly based, 
with most industries and most parts of the 
country sharing in the improvement. 

The most significant contribution to the 
increase in demand came from a sharp ex- 
pansion in merchandise exports, higher out- 
lays for fixed capital and increased con- 
sumer spending. 

Merchandise exports in the first half of 
1963 were $226 million higher than in the 
corresponding period of the previous year. 
This increase, which amounted to better 
than 7 per cent, resulted in an export sur- 
plus of $135 million on merchandise trade, 
compared with a $52 million deficit during 
the same period in 1962. 

Combined capital outlays on plant and 
machinery during the first half of 1963 
averaged 3.5 per cent higher than in 1962. 
The increase in expenditures on machinery 
and equipment brought the annual rate in 
the second quarter to the highest value 
since the high investment level of 1957. 

The upward trend in labour income 
seems to have had considerable influence on 
the buying mood of the average consumer. 
Retail sales have shown a strong advance. 
In the third quarter, they were running 
about 6 per cent ahead of the year before. 
Government spending on consumer goods 
and services was moderately higher in 1963 
than in 1962. Housebuilding was an addi- 
tional source of strength: housing starts in 
1963 were 16 per cent higher than in 1962. 

But there are still a number of problems 
to be solved. Unemployment is still high, 
despite the very considerable decrease that 
occurred during the past year. In addition, 
soft spots in particular industries and in 
particular areas require special attention. 



In December, employment was 268,000 
higher, and unemployment 68,000 lower 
than a year earlier. In September and 
October the seasonally adjusted unemploy- 
ment rate was 5.3 per cent, the lowest since 
early in 1957. 

The sharp fluctuations in seasonal activity 
continue to be one of the largest single 
causes of unemployment in Canada. As part 
of a program aimed at reducing this kind 
of unemployment, the Government has 
taken certain measures with respect to 
particular industries. The construction in- 
dustry, which accounts for a major part 
of seasonal unemployment, has been given 
particular attention. 

The Municipal Winter Works Incentive 
Program has been expanded and changed 
in several ways. This program has been 
broadened progressively since it was intro- 
duced in the winter of 1958-59, so that 
winter employment provided through the 
program has expanded steadily. This year, 
the ceiling on federal incentives for build- 
ings and municipal renovations was raised 
from $50 thousand to $100 thousand in 
order that municipalities could plan the 
inclusion of larger buildings in their winter 
work plans. 

A new incentive has been added to pro- 
vide further stimulus to construction in 45 
areas of high winter unemployment and 35 
areas of heavy long-term unemployment. 
The federal payments for approved proj- 
ects in these areas have been raised from 
50 to 60 per cent of payroll costs. 

To promote a higher level of residential 
construction, a new incentive has been tried 
this year: a direct payment of $500 to the 
first purchaser or owner of a house which 
is substantially built during the months 
December to March. This incentive has had 
a substantial impact on housebuilding em- 
ployment this winter: housing starts in 
December in urban centres of 5,000 popula- 
tion and over were 109.9 per cent more 
than starts in December 1962. 

In addition to action to reduce unemploy- 
ment during the winter months, a program 
has been established to attract new in- 
dustrial facilities to areas of slow growth 
and chronic unemployment. Under this 
program, firms establishing new enter- 
prises in 35 designated areas will be allowed 
a "tax holiday" for three years, and may 
thereafter claim accelerated depreciation 
for income tax purposes. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



105 



In many parts of eastern Canada, unem- 
ployment has been a more persistent and 
more serious problem than in other parts 
of the country. The Atlantic Provinces 
Development Board has been established 
to strengthen these provinces and a fund 
has been provided to promote capital invest- 
ment. 

The Government intends to increase its 
support to the training of unemployed 
workers. In order to provide further 
encouragement to the training of unem- 
ployed workers, the Government proposes 
to increase its contribution to the provinces 
from 70 to 90 per cent of the provincial 
training allowance. This additional con- 
tribution will allow the provinces to release 
more funds for additional programs. 

Action has also been taken to reduce 
unemployment among older workers. The 
Older Workers Incentive Program is an 
experiment to see whether the payment of 
part of wages will encourage employers 
to hire and train workers over 45 years of 
age who have been unemployed for six 
months or more. 

Wages and Working Conditions 

In August 1963, average weekly wages 
and salaries of non-farm workers in 
Canada was $83.28, an increase of $2.48, 
or 3.0 per cent, over August 1962. This 
increase represented a rise in real wages 
and salaries of more than 1 per cent over 
the twelve-month period. 

All major industrial groups in the 
economy shared in the increase of weekly 
wages and salaries achieved between 
August 1962 and August 1963. Earnings in 
manufacturing, construction, public utilities, 
mining, forestry, and transportation, storage 
and communication showed a greater rate 
of increase than the over-all industrial 
averages. The ranking of industries by 
average weekly wages and salaries was 
unchanged from 1962. As in the previous 
year, the largest relative increase in weekly 
income was in the Atlantic region. British 
Columbia continued to enjoy the highest 
average income. 

Over the past decade or so, Canadian in- 
dustry has reduced the work-year by reduc- 
ing the standard work week and by extend- 
ing annual paid statutory holidays and vaca- 
tions. A survey of working conditions in 
Canadian manufacturing industries shows 
that last year, 75 per cent of plant workers 
were employed in establishments with a 
standard work week of 40 hours or less, 
compared with 25 per cent in 1949. 

Over the same period, at least two weeks 
of vacation has become practically universal. 



In addition, the proportion of plant workers 
granted three weeks annual paid vacation 
after varying years of service increased to 
seven out of ten plant workers from the 
1949 level of three out of ten. A further 
change in the pattern of paid vacations has 
been the steady increase in the number of 
long-service employees entitled to a fourth 
week — 40 per cent in 1963 contrasted with 
only 4 per cent a decade ago. 

In the past ten years, the proportion of 
plant workers entitled to eight or more 
statutory holidays annually has increased 
from 50 per cent to nearly 75 per cent. 

Industrial Relations 

Collective agreements covering hundreds 
of thousands of workers were concluded 
without work stoppage during 1963. In the 
first nine months of the year, the propor- 
tion of working time lost through industrial 
disputes amounted to less than one tenth of 
one per cent. 

The most extensive strikes were in the 
construction industry in Ontario, manu- 
facturing in Quebec and in the fishing in- 
dustry in British Columbia. A strike involv- 
ing construction workers in the Toronto 
area resulted in an employment loss of 
63,000 man days. 

One of the more discouraging situations 
that had to be faced during the year con- 
cerned the actions of the Seafarers' Inter- 
national Union. In order to put an end to 
the harassment to maritime shipping, the 
Government accepted the recommendations 
of the Norris Industrial Inquiry Commis- 
sion and, after approval by Parliament of 
the necessary legislation, imposed a tem- 
porary Government trusteeship over mari- 
time transportation unions. 

During the first half of 1963, nearly 
150,000 workers across Canada were 
affected by 116 major collective agree- 
ments negotiated in all industrial sectors 
except construction. A major collective 
agreement is one that covers 500 or more 
employees. 

The duration of these major agreements 
ranged from one to three years; 27 were 
effective for a one-year term, 69 for two 
years, 16 for three years, and the rest for 
various other periods within the range. 

More than half of the one-year con- 
tracts provide wage increases of 3 to 6 cents 
an hour on labour rates. Nearly half of the 
two-year contracts gave increases of 7 to 
13 cents a year. Eight of the three-year 
agreements granted wage increases totalling 
10 to 13 cents an hour over the life of the 
agreement. 

— Employment and Labour Market Division, 
Economics and Research Branch. 



106 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



ILO Reports on World Labour Situation in 1963 

The world labour situation in 1963 fol- The total number of employed persons 

lowed the pattern of previous years: con- reached new record levels in 1963 in almost 

tinued improvement in industrialized all of the industrialized countries. In 

countries, a generally stagnant situation in several countries, however, the rate of in- 

the developing countries. Such is the picture crease was somewhat slower than in 1962. 

that emerges from the statistical data In the industrialized countries, workers in 

gathered by the International Labour Office agriculture and in mining continued to move 

and released last month. into other industries. 

In the industrialized countries, employ- Unemployment, as in previous years, was 
ment is rising and unemployment (except in unevenly spread in the world As a result 
a few cases) is diminishing, weekly hours of favourable conditions it has fallen in 
of work are going down, and money wage a number of countries (most of the in- 
creases generally exceed rises in con- dustnahzed countries of Europe and Japan) 
sumer prices, despite the fact that prices virtually to a rock-bottom level. In fact, 
have been increasing, in most cases at an ^ European countries have had a 
accelerating rate. shortage of manpower Scattered and in- 

^. , 4 . .u j i • complete data from the developing countries 

Figures relating to the developing indicate ^ unemployment and especially 

countries are spotty Nevertheless, the underemployment remained very high, 

available data show that the workers in , { as resmt of the increasing popula . 

these countries continue to suffer from t - f 

widespread unemployment and under- l The dse m consumer prices was slightly 

employment, often accompanied by price more rapid in 1963 than in the previous 

increases reaching as high as 40, 80 or year m most f the countries surveyed; but 

even over 100 per cent. The gap between j n one country out of five the rise slackened, 
the situation of workers in industrialized Money wages increased in virtually all 

and developing countries is thus widening. the countries for which data were available. 

Employment and Unemployment, January 

An estimated 6,231,000 persons were employed in January. The decrease of 197,000 
during the month was about in line with seasonal expectations. 

Unemployment increased seasonally by 120,000 between December and January, to 
466,000. The labour force declined by 77,000 to 6,697,000, mainly as the result of with- 
drawal of seasonal workers. 

Unemployment in January represented 7.0 per cent of the labour force, compared with 
8.3 per cent in January 1963 and 8.5 per cent in January 1962. In December the unem- 
ployment rate was 5.1 per cent. 

Seasonally adjusted, the January unemployment rate was 4.9 per cent, unchanged 
from December. 

Employment in January was up by 275,000, or 4.6 per cent, from a year earlier, and 
unemployment was down 75,000. The labour force was 200,000 higher than in January 
1963. 

Employment — The employment decline between December and January stemmed 
mainly from seasonal reductions in outdoor activities and the release of temporary help 
hired for the Christmas season. In non-farm industries, employment showed a net decrease 
of 189,000, which was about average for the period. The decline in farm employment 
was the smallest in several years. 

Compared with a year earlier, non-farm employment was up 240,000. The largest 
increases occurred in service, manufacturing and trade. Agricultural employment was 
35,000 higher than in January 1963. 

During the fall and early winter months, the number of employed men decreased less 
than usual, reflecting the strength of the goods-producing industries, particularly manu- 
facturing, forestry and residential construction. In January 1964, an estimated 4,416,000 
men were employed, some 143,000, or 3.3 per cent, more than a year earlier. This 
compared with an average annual rate of increase of 1.4 per cent during the past five 
years. Employment of women continued at a high level. 

Employment was up considerably from the previous year in all regions except the 
Atlantic, where it was virtually unchanged. The increases ranged from 4.4 per cent 
in Ontario to 6.7 per cent in British Columbia. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 107 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 



Manpower Situation, Fourth Quarter, 1963 



The last half of 1963 was a period of 
continuing economic expansion in Canada, 
during which industrial output, employment 
and incomes advanced to record levels. The 
improvement surpassed earlier expectations. 

For a brief period early in the sum- 
mer, the pace of business activity showed 
signs of slowing down: many key sectors of 
the economy experienced little or no 
advance for several months. In the last 
half of the year, however, the expansion 
me more broadly based. As a result, 
the momentum picked up considerably, 
ally in the final quarter of 1963. 
Moreover, most of the key business sectors 
which tend to foreshadow coming events 
showed a concerted rise. Thus, at the start 
of the new year, prospects for the months 
ahead were generally bright. 

Productive activity has been rising 
steadily during recent months. Between 
August and October, the seasonally ad- 
justed index of industrial production in- 
creased by 2.5 per cent. Production in- 
creases were recorded in almost all parts of 
manufacturing: especially large gains took 
place in some of the durable goods in- 
dustries. 

Data on new orders and unfilled orders 
indicate that the high level of activity in 
manufacturing will be sustained. Unfilled 
orders have risen steadily since August 
(discounting seasonal factors), climbing to 
12 - billion in October. The October total 
of unfilled orders — up 9 per cent from 
January 1963 — was the highest in almost 
six years. 

Increased consumer expenditures on 
goods and services provided a strong ex- 
pansionary influence during 1963. Sup- 
ported by a strong demand for automobiles 
and other durables, retail sales in the first 
11 months of the year were 4.9 per cent 
higher than in the corresponding period in 
1963; in the July-November period, the 
increase over the year was 6.1 per cent. 

Although quantitatively less important 
than consumer expenditures. exports, 
government spending, and investment on 
machinery and equipment increased sub- 
stantially over the year. Merchandise ex- 
ports in the first 11 months of 1963 were 
8.4 per cent higher than in the correspond- 
ing period in 1962. 

The upward trend in consumer spending 
has been reinforced by rising incomes. 
Between January and October, labour in- 



come increased by 4.6 per cent, after sea- 
sonal adjustment. All provinces and all 
major industries shared in the increase in 
labour income. 

Employment declined less than seasonally 
during the last quarter of 1963. This was 
the second consecutive quarter in which 
there was a noticeable improvement, the 
combined increase for the two quarters 
being 3.0 per cent, after seasonal adjust- 
ment. 

The average length of the work week in 
manufacturing was 40.9 hours in October 
compared with 40.5 hours in July, which was 
the low point for the year. Average weekly 
hours declined steadily between April and 
July, after which they began to increase 
again. Average hourly earnings, at S1.9" in 
October, were at an all-time high. The 
increase since the beginning of 1963 was 
6 cents an hour. 

Unemployment increased less than sea- 
sonally between the third and fourth 
quarters of 1962. Rising by 34,000, the 
increase was only about half the average 
for the period during the past five years. 
The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate 
declined steadily during the last half of the 
year, from 6.0 per cent in July to 4.9 per 
cent in December. At year-end, the unem- 
ployment rate was at its lowest since the 
summer of 195". 

Employment 

Employment in the fourth quarter of 1963 
averaged higher by 248.000, or 4.0 per cent, 
than in the corresponding period in 1962. 
Almost all of the increase was in non-farm 
industries. The largest gains occurred in 
service and manufacturing, which together 
nted for about three-quarters of the 
total advance. Smaller gains took place in 
trade, forestry and construction. In the 
remaining industries, employment levels 
were much the same as the year before. 

During the second half of 1963. total 
employment, seasonally adjusted, increased 
by 3.0 per cent, which represents some 
189.000 new jobs. This was a substantially 
higher rate of advance than in the first six 
months. The improvement was widespread; 
most of the major industrial divisions out- 
side of agriculture showed gains. By con- 
trast, in the earlier part of the year, the 
employment expansion was largely con- 
fined to the service industry. 

The remarkably strong performance of 
the economy during the second half of 



The review is prepared by the Employment and Labour Market Division of the 
Economics and Research Branch. 



108 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



1963 can be attributed, in large part, to 
the resurgence of activity in manufacturing. 
Employment gains in manufacturing were 
generally larger and more widespread than 
in any similar period of the current busi- 
ness upturn. Between June and November, 
total manufacturing employment increased 
by 2.0 per cent. The seasonally adjusted 
employment index in November climbed to 
118.0. This was 10.1 per cent above the 
trough of the last business cycle and estab- 
lished a new peak, breaking the previous 
record established in 1956. 

The durable goods sector of manufactur- 
ing has been a major expansionary force 
during recent months. Between June and 
November, employment in this component 
increased by 3.3 per cent, after allowing 
for seasonal factors. The automotive in- 
dustry continued to be the pace-setter. At 
the end of November, motor vehicle em- 
ployment was 16.4 per cent higher than the 
year before and 26.0 per cent higher than 
two years ago. Motor vehicle parts and 
accessories registered a similarly large 
advance. During the latter part of the year, 
activity in this industry was at an all-time 
high. 

Other durable goods industries that 
figured prominently in the business upturn 
during the past year were iron and steel, 
aircraft and parts and wood products. 
Activity in the electrical apparatus and sup- 
plies industries remained fairly stable dur- 
ing the first half of 1963, after expanding at 
an unusually rapid pace during 1961 and 
1962. More recently, this industry has 
resumed an upward trend, and recorded an 
employment gain of 1.3 per cent between 
July and November. Except for shipbuild- 
ing, which registered a slight decrease, em- 
ployment levels increased over the year in 
all of the durable goods industries. 

Responding to the upward trend in orders 
from such important steel consuming in- 
dustries as building construction and the 
automotive industry, output and employ- 
ment expanded noticeably in almost all 
branches of iron and steel products. Cana- 
dian mills turned out 8 million tons of steel 
ingots in 1963, an increase of 14.2 per cent 
from the previous year. 



To an increasing extent, Canadian pro- 
ducers were supplying the domestic 
market. At the same time, there has been 
a strong advance in exports. In the first 
eleven months of 1963, exports of iron and 
steel products were more than one-fifth 
higher, in value, than in the corresponding 
period in 1962. The largest employment 
advance during the year was in primary 
iron and steel; in November, the employ- 
ment index was 6.1 per cent higher than 
a year earlier and 19.5 per cent above the 
cyclical low point, which was reached at 
the beginning of 1961. 

In the non-durable goods sector, em- 
ployment expanded during the second half 
of 1963 in the clothing and textile industries. 
Each of these registered a year-to-year em- 
ployment advance of 5.0 per cent at the 
end of November. Elsewhere in this sector 
of manufacturing, employment levels showed 
little year-to-year change. 

The service industry experienced a 
relatively slow rate of employment growth 
during the first half of 1963 but it has been 
a major expansionary force since then. In 
the final quarter of 1963, employment in the 
service industry averaged 108,000 higher 
than in the corresponding quarter of 1962. 
The largest gains were in community, and 
personal service. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment declined noticeably dur- 
ing 1963, particularly during the last half 
of the year. The unemployment rate 
averaged 4.5 per cent in the fourth quarter 
of 1963, the lowest of any fourth quarter 
since 1956. 

Between the fourth quarter of 1962 and 
the fourth quarter of 1963, the unemploy- 
ment rate dropped from 6.0 per cent to 
5.1 per cent for men and from 3.2 per cent 
to 2.9 per cent for women. 

In December 1963, unemployment was 
estimated at 346,000, down 68,000 from the 
year before. Virtually all of the drop was 
among persons unemployed for more than 
one month, and more than four fifths of 
the decrease was among persons 25 to 64 
years of age. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Shortage 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 




January 
1964 


January 
1963 


January 
1964 


January 
1963 


January 
1964 


January 
1963 


January 
1964 


January 
1963 




6 
13 
5 

27 


8 
16 

6 
39 


6 
11 

9 
26 


4 
10 

8 
18 












2 








Major agricultural 









Minor 


4 














Total 


51 


69 


52 


40 


6 

















THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



109 



Regional Manpower Situation 

ATLANTIC 



In the Atlantic region, employment 
showed an above-average decrease during 
the latter part of 1963. Between the third 
and fourth quarters, total employment fell 
by an estimated 36,000, which compares 
with an average decline of 24,000 during 
this period in the previous five years. By 
contrast, each of the nation's other four 
regions registered better-than-seasonal gains 
during this period. 

The slowing-down that became apparent 
in the October-December period followed a 
fairly strong third quarter. Between the 
second and third quarters of 1963, total em- 
ployment in the region, allowing for 
seasonal factors, increased by 1.7 per cent, 
the same rate of advance as for the country 
as a whole. The first half of 1963 was a 
period of relatively slow growth, so that the 
net advance for the full year was fairly 
small. 

The lack of over-all employment growth 
during the fourth quarter of 1963 is some- 
what surprising, considering the improve- 
ments in certain key industries. Manufactur- 
ing, for example, has shown further 
strengthening, with virtually all major 
sectors of the industry sharing in the im- 
provement. 

Mining employment edged down during 
the last half of the year but it continued 
substantially above year-earlier levels. The 
construction industry was a constant source 
of weakness throughout 1963. In the service- 
producing industries, employment changes 
during the final quarter of 1963 were about 
in line with seasonal patterns. 

In the fourth quarter of 1963, employment 
averaged 555,000, about the same as the 
year before. The year-to-year comparison 
shows a mixture of gains and losses among 
individual industries and areas. Employ- 
ment was higher than the year before in 
manufacturing, mining and forestry, and 
lower in transportation and construction. 
There was little change over the year in 
the number of employed persons in the 
service industries. 



Employment in manufacturing increased 
considerably during the past year. At the 
end of October, the index (1949=100) was 
120.1, up from 115.0 a year earlier and up 
from 110.0 two years before. The improve- 
ment in this industry was remarkably wide- 
spread. Except for railway rolling stock, 
which showed little or no change, all parts 
of manufacturing shared in the increase. 
Year-to-year gains ranged from 2.8 per 
cent in paper products to 11.0 per cent in 
shipbuilding. 

Activity in metal mining showed an 
irregular decline during the last half of 
1963. Nevertheless, total mining employ- 
ment remained appreciably higher than a 
year earlier. At Bell Island, Nfld., opera- 
tions were resumed in September, after a 
two-month shutdown, although small reduc- 
tions in the work force took place again 
during the final quarter of 1963. In the fourth 
quarter, employment was higher than the 
year before in both metal mining and non- 
metal mining. Activity in fuels showed 
little change over the year. 

Forestry employment increased more than 
seasonally during the latter part of 1963, 
after being at an unusually low level for 
more than a year. The construction in- 
dustry, which has been a continuing source 
of weakness throughout the current busi- 
ness upswing, failed to improve during 
the last half of the year. Prospects were a 
little brighter, however, as a result of an 
upward trend in contracts awarded. In the 
July-October period, the value of construc- 
tion contracts awarded was 11 per cent 
higher than in the summer months in 1962. 

Unemployment in the Atlantic region 
during the fourth quarter of 1963 averaged 
45,000, or 7.6 per cent of the labour force. 
In the fourth quarter of 1962, the average 
unemployment rate was 9.1 per cent and 
in 1961, it was 8.8 per cent. 

In December, the classification of the 
21 labour market areas in the region (last 
year's figures in brackets) was as follows: 
in substantial surplus, 17 (18); in moderate 
surplus, 4(3). 



QUEBEC 



The last half of 1963 featured a strong 
employment advance in the Quebec region. 
Increasing by 2.3 per cent in the third 
quarter and 1.5 per cent in the fourth 
quarter (allowing for seasonal factors), the 
expansion represents a net gain of about 
65,000 new jobs since April-June. This was 
a substantially faster pace of advance that 



in any previous six-month period of the 
current business upswing. This rise in em- 
ployment was accompanied by a strengthen- 
ing in labour force growth. 

The number of unemployed, adjusted 
for seasonal variations, remained relatively 
high during the summer months but 



no 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



registered a decline during the last half 
of 1963. 

Consumer expenditures on goods and 
services have provided an important stimulus 
to the employment expansion. In October 
and November, retail sales in Quebec were 
about 6 per cent higher than in the sum- 
mer months in 1962. Providing additional 
support was the rising trend in exports, 
increases being recorded in a fairly wide 
range of products. 

Estimated employment in the fourth 
quarter of 1963 averaged 1,803,000, which 
represents a net gain of 93,000, or 5.2 per 
cent, over the fourth quarter of 1962. All 
of the advance was in non-farm industries. 
Farm employment was slightly lower than 
a year earlier. 

One of the more notable developments in 
the Quebec labour market during the 
second half of 1963 was the unusually 
strong advance in service employment. The 
improvement appears to have been mainly 
in business, community and personal service. 
Other industries, which recorded noticeable 
employment gains since the middle of the 
year, discounting seasonal influences, were 
trade, finance, insurance and real estate. 

Increasing job opportunities in the service- 
producing industries attracted a large num- 
ber of women into the labour market, and 
an equally large number found jobs. In 
December, the number of women in the 
labour force of the Quebec region was 
estimated to be 48,000 higher than a year 
earlier. Between 1960 and 1961, and 1961 
and 1962, (December figures), the number 
of women in the labour force showed very 
little change. 



Employment levels in manufacturing 
have been generally well maintained. 
Industries that showed further signs of 
strengthening were clothing, textiles and 
wood products. Activity in shipbuilding and 
electrical apparatus declined during this 
period. 

Construction and mining employment 
declined seasonally during the fourth 
quarter. Residential construction was 
reported to have held up better than usual, 
but decreases in other sectors of construc- 
tion appear to have been about in line with 
seasonal patterns. Housing starts in Novem- 
ber were 12 per cent higher than a year 
earlier. 

The largest year-to-year employment 
gains took place in the service-producing 
industries. Manufacturing registered a net 
gain of about 1 per cent with gains in food, 
textiles, clothing, wood products and non- 
ferrous metals. The employment advances 
in these industries more than made up for 
the losses in shipbuilding and electrical 
apparatus. At the end of October, the em- 
ployment index in construction was 148.8, 
up from 146.8 a year earlier. Mining and 
forestry registered small year-to-year 
declines. 

Unemployment in the fourth quarter of 
1963 averaged 114,000, or 5.9 per cent of 
the labour force. In the last quarter of 
1962, the unemployment rate was 7.0 per 
cent; in 1961, it was 6.5 per cent. 

In December, the classification of the 24 
labour market areas in the region (last year's 
figures in brackets) was as follows: in 
moderate surplus, 6(7); in substantial sur- 
plus, 18(17). 



ONTARIO 



The pace of business quickened in 
Ontario during the last half of 1963. The 
improvement was reflected in increased em- 
ployment and income and a substantial 
decrease in the number of unemployed. By 
the end of the year, production levels con- 
tinued to be well maintained in most 
industrial centres. Much of the support has 
come from heavy expenditures on consumer 
goods. Other important contributing factors 
stemmed from an upward trend in exports 
and a renewed expansion of expenditures 
on capital goods. 

Total employment, seasonally adjusted, 
increased by an estimated 23,000, or 1 per 
cent, between the third and fourth quarter 
of 1963. The main supporting strength can 
be traced to manufacturing and the service- 
producing industries. Service employment, 
which expanded relatively slowly during 
1962 and the first half of 1963, has shown 



a strong advance during the past three 
months. A similar trend has been apparent 
in trade, the most marked improvement 
being in retail trade. 

The upward trend in manufacturing 
employment that began in the second 
quarter of 1962 continued unabated during 
recent months. Showing the strongest year- 
to-year advances were the automotive and 
automotive parts industries, steel, lumber 
and textiles. Production of passenger cars 
in the last five months of 1963 was one- 
fifth higher than in the corresponding period 
of the previous year. For the calendar 
year, output of motor vehicles (passenger 
cars and trucks) totalled 630,550, establish- 
ing a new record. At year-end, employment 
in the automotive industry was 15 per cent 
higher than the year before. 

Steel plants operated at close to rated 
capacity during the fourth quarter, with 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



111 



ingot production showing a subtantial in- 
crease over the year. As a result of ex- 
panding rolling-mill facilities, which have 
made it possible to produce an increasing 
variety of extra-wide plates and sheets, 
there has been a substatnial reduction in 
imports. About 90 per cent of Canadian 
requirements are now being met by domestic 
producers. Over the year, employment in 
primary iron and steel, and steel products 
other than transportation equipment, rose 
by approximately 5 per cent. 

Among the metal-using industries that 
showed sizeable gains during the last half 
of 1963 were agricultural implements — 
benefitting from increased domestic and 
export sales — machinery — where bookings 
were still increasing — and makers of iron 
castings. There was some improvement, too, 
in the aircraft industry. Activity in the 
electrical-goods industry has levelled off 
at the high plateau that was reached in the 
early part of the year. 

Except for certain parts of non-ferrous 
metals, which experienced cutbacks in pro- 
duction and employment during the latter 
part of the year, employment levels were 
well maintained in all parts of the durable- 
goods industries. In the soft-goods sector, 
there was evidence of further strengthening. 



There were moderate gains in textiles and 
clothing, both of which showed an im- 
provement over the year. In other non- 
durable goods industries, employment levels 
have shown little change since the middle 
of the year, apart from seasonal fluctuations. 

The construction industry showed some 
improvement in the final quarter of 1963, 
after contributing little to the expansion 
of the economy during the spring and sum- 
mer months. Housing starts increased 
sharply during the latter part of the year. 
Suppliers of building materials were reported 
to be very busy, reflecting the pick-up in 
residential construction. 

In farming and forestry employment, 
changes between the third and fourth 
quarter followed seasonal patterns. Em- 
ployment in metal mining showed a some- 
what larger than seasonal decrease. 

Unemployment in Ontario increased 
seasonally between the third and fourth 
quarter of 1963. Averaging 77,000, or 3.1 
per cent of the labour force, it was slightly 
lower than a year earlier. 

In December, the classification of the 34 
Labour market areas in the region (last 
year's figures in brackets) was as follows: 
in balance, 5(4); in moderate surplus, 27 
(25); in substantial surplus, 2(5). 



PRAIRIE 



A record wheat crop, estimated at 703 
million bushels, gave the Prairie economy 
a considerable boost during the last half 
of 1963. The bumper crop found a ready 
market in Russia, China and other Com- 
munist countries. The resulting increase in 
farm cash income provided a strong 
stimulus for expansion of consumer goods 
and services which, in turn, gave rise to a 
pick-up in employment throughout the 
region. Reflecting the increase in farm 
cash income, purchases of farm implements 
during the latter part of 1963 were run- 
ning 15 per cent ahead of a year earlier. 

In the fourth quarter of 1963, employ- 
ment was estimated to average 1,136,000, 
an increase of 36,000, or 3.3 per cent, over 
the fourth quarter of 1962. Most of the 
improvement took place in the last half 
of the year. The largest gains over the year 
were in non-farm industries — mainly in 
trade, finance and services. Farm employ- 
ment, however, increased by an estimated 
18,000, against the secular trend. 

During the seasonal peak in farm 
activities last summer, employment in agri- 
culture was estimated to be 346,000, which 
was some 9,000 higher than the year before. 
However, even with a larger farm work 
force, farm help was reported to have been 
in short supply in most areas during the 



112 



harvesting season. With the completion of 
grain harvesting, the demand for farm 
workers eased noticeably. During Novem- 
ber and December, cattle feeders and 
general farm workers were in demand in 
a number of areas. 

The construction industry experienced a 
relatively slow third quarter but showed 
some improvement in the final quarter of 
the year. Housing was a little stronger at 
year-end, although it still lacked much of 
the vigour which was in evidence a year 
earlier. Activity in non-residential construc- 
tion continued at about the same level as 
the year before, a decline in institutional 
building being offset by gains in other 
sectors, notably in pipeline construction. 

Manufacturing employment continued to 
expand. In the fourth quarter, year-to-year 
gains were apparent in clothing, wood prod- 
ucts, iron and steel and transportation 
equipment. The aircraft and parts industry 
showed a particularly strong advance. Rail- 
road and railway rolling stock equipment 
showed a more modest improvement. 

Employment was lower than a year earlier 
in non-metallic minerals and petroleum and 
coal products. Mining employment rose 
during the last half of 1963, mainly as a 
result of increased output of non-ferrous 
metals and potash. Some improvement 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



occurred also in coal mining and oil drilling. 
During the last half of 1962 and the first 
half of 1963, mining employment had been 
following a downward course. 

The general prosperity of the region 
brought about a decided increase in 
activity in trade, finance and services during 
both the third and fourth quarters. In 
transportation and public utilities, employ- 
ment was remarkably stable during the 
period under review, aside from seasonal 
variations. 



Unemployment in the region dropped 
seasonally in the third quarter of 1963 and 
increased less than seasonally in the final 
quarter, when it averaged 33,000, or 2.8 
per cent of the labour force, compared 
with 41,000, or 3.6 per cent of the labour 
force, a year earlier. 

In December, the classification of the 
19 labour market areas in the region (last 
year's figures in brackets) was as follows: 
in balance, 1 (0); in moderate surplus, 17 
(14); in substantial surplus, 1 (5). 



PACIFIC 



The brisk upward trend that was char- 
asteristic of employment in the Pacific 
region during the early part of 1963 gained 
momentum as the year progressed. Over 
the year, total employment in the region 
rose by an estimated 27,000, a gain of 
about 5 per cent. Except for a temporary 
pause during the second half of 1962, the 
region has experienced an uninterrupted 
expansion during the past three years. The 
largest gains in the latter half of 1963 
took place in forestry, manufacturing, con- 
struction, trade and finance. 

Construction employment has shown a 
strong advance since mid-summer, resulting 
in the busiest fourth quarter since 1959. 
The most marked improvement was in 
residential construction. Housing starts in 
October-November were 35 per cent higher 
than in the corresponding months of 1962. 
Activity in the non-residential sector also 
increased, as work advanced on several large 
business and engineering projects. The $73.5 
million Portage Mountain hydro dam on 
the Peace River is one of the larger 
engineering projects presently under con- 
struction. 

Employment in all major sectors of the 
forestry industry showed increases during 
1963, the total gain being approximately 
5 per cent. The logging, lumber and ply- 
wood industries experienced substantial 
advances in production and sales, and bene- 
fited from improved prices. Increased lum- 
ber shipments to the United States helped 
to bolster activity in this industry. The two- 
month strike of the United States west-coast 
lumber industry provided a temporary 
stimulus to output and employment in 
Canadian mills. 

Mining employment remained fairly 
stable during the second half of 1963, after 
registering an advance during the early part 



of the year. New markets were secured 
with Japan for coal, copper and iron ore. 
Another development that had an impact 
on the mining industry during the year was 
the completion of the oil pipeline linking 
the Peace River district and the coast, 
thereby allowing shipments to the United 
States. 

Manufacturing employment rose by about 
2 per cent over the year, most of the gain 
occurring in the last half of 1963. Advances 
were recorded during the third and fourth 
quarters in wood and paper products. 
Printing shops and chemical plants also 
contributed to the employment rise. The 
iron and steel industry continued to operate 
at a high level, turning out structural and 
reinforcing steel, conveying equipment, and 
various machinery items. 

In the shipbuilding and food industries, 
employment levels were moderately lower 
than the year before. Layoffs were reported 
to have taken place in a number of meat 
processing plants during the past year as a 
result of automatic equipment being 
installed. 

All parts of the transportation industry 
experienced a busy fourth quarter; employ- 
ment was slightly higher than a year earlier. 
In trade, finance and service establishments, 
employment rose by about 5 per cent over 
the year. About half of this was in the 
final two quarters. 

During the fourth quarter of 1963, un- 
employment in the Pacific region averaged 
38,000, or 5.8 per cent of the labour force. 
In the fourth quarter of 1962, it averaged 
42,000, or 6.7 per cent of the labour force. 

In December, the 1 1 labour market areas 
in the region (last year's figures in 
brackets) were classified as follows: in 
moderate surplus, 7 (6); in substantial sur- 
plus, 4 (5). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



113 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-JANUARY 





Substantial 


Moderate 








Labour 


Labour 


Approximate 


Labour 


— 


Surplus 


Surplus 


Balance 


Shortage 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




CALGARY -< — 
EDMONTON -<-— 


Halifax 
Hamilton 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Quebec-Levis 
St. John's 


Montreal 
Ottawa-Hull 






(labour force 75,000 or more) 


Vancouver-New 
Westminster- 
Mission City 

WINNIPEG -< — 


Toronto 
Windsor 








Corner Brook 


Brantford 


— >-GUELPH 






CORNWALL -< — 


Kitchener 


— ^KITCHENER 






Farnham-Granby 


London 








FT. WILLIAM- 


Oshawa 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 


PT. ARTHUR -< — 

Joliette 


Peterborough 
Rouyn-Val d'Or 






(labour force 25.000-75,000; 


Lac St. Jean 


Saint John 






60 per cent or more in non- 


Moncton 


Sarnia 






agricultural activity) 


New Glasgow 
Niagara Peninsula 
Shawinigan 
Sherbrooke 
Sydney 


Sudbury 

Timmins-Kirkland Lake 
Victoria 








Trois Rivieres 










Charlottetown 


Barrie 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 


PRINCE ALBERT ■< — 
Riviere du Loup 


Brandon 
Chatham 






AREAS 


Thetford-Lac Megantic- 


Lethbridge 






(labour force 25,000-75,000; 


Ville St. Georges 


MOOSE JAW -< — 






40 per cent or more in 


YORKTON -< — 


North Battleford 






agriculture) 




Red Deer 

Regina 

Saskatoon 








Bathurst 


Belleville-Trenton 


Gait 






BEAUHARNOIS -< — 


Brampton 


St. Thomas 






Bracebridge 


Central Vancouver 


Stratford 






Bridgewater 


Island 


Woodstock- 






Campbellton 


Cranbrook 


Tillsonburg 






Chilliwack 


Dawson Creek 








Dauphin 


Drumheller 








Drummondville 


Fredericton 








Edmundston 


Goderich 








Gaspe 


Kamloops 








Grand Falls 


Lachute-Ste. Therese 






MINOR AREAS 


KENTVILLE -< — 
Montmagny 


Lindsay 

LISTOWEL <— 






(labour force 


Newcastle 


Medicine Hat 






10.000 to 25.000) 


Okanagan Valley 
Prince George-Quesnel 
Quebec North Shore 
Rimouski 


North Bay 
Owen Sound 
Portage la Prairie 
Pembroke 








Ste. Agathe-St. Jerome 


— >-PRINCE RUPERT 




* 




St. Stephen 


Sault Ste. Marie 








Sorel 


Simcoe 








Summerside 


Swift Current 








Truro 


Trail-Nelson 








Valleyfield 


St. Hyacinthe 








Victoriaville 


St. Jean 








Woodstock, N.B. 


Weyburn 








Yarmouth 


Walkerton 







NOTE: Kitimat — Labour Market Area is no longer included in this listing. 

^The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month ; an arrow indicate* the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classification used see page 491. June 1963 issue. 



114 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1944 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous 
Month 



Previous 
Year 



Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 
Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) .... 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg ) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars (1949 = 

100) 

Total labour income $000,000. 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 

New Residential Construction (b) 

Starts 

Completions 

Under Construction 



January 
January 
January 
January 
January 

January 
January 
January 

January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 

January 
January 

November 
November 

Yr 1963 
Yr 1963 



January 
January 
January 



November 
November 
November 
November 
January 

November 
November 



December 
December 
December 
December 



January 
January 
January 



6,697 
6,231 
573 
5,658 
5,141 

5,274 
789 
168 



72 

173 

120 

54 

47 

428 
38 

128.7 
118.5 

93,151 
45,866 



13 

1,756 
21,730 



$84.63 

$ 1.97 

41.5 

$81.95 

134.2 

146.3 
1,884 



199.7 
174.2 
178.3 
170.7 



8,313 

6,238 

81,125 



- 1.1 

- 3.1 

- 1.4 

- 3.2 

- 3.5 

- 3.5 

- 2.2 
+ 9.1 

+34.7 
+44.0 
+33.1 
+34.8 
+45.9 
+17.5 

+31.3 
+90.0 

- 0.5 

- 0.7 



■59.4 
■59.6 
■43.3 



0.0 
0.5 
0.2 
1.3 
0.0 

1.1 
0.8 



5.4 
7.1 
6.9 
7.3 



-40.7 
-30.1 
+ 2.4 



+ 3.1 

+ 4.6 

+ 6.5 

+ 4.4 

+ 4.0 

+ 3.1 

+18.1 

- 1.8 

-13.9 

-18.2 

- 9.9 

- 7.7 
-26.0 
-19.0 

-14.9 
0.0 

+ 3.5 
+ 3.3 

+24.9 
+24.8 



-45.8 
-61.5 

-72.8 



3.8 
3.7 
0.7 
4.9 
1.7 

3.2 
8.1 



+ 9.6 
+ 8.7 
+ 9.8 

+ 7.7 



+87.1 
- 3.5 
+38.5 



(a) Estimates of the labour force, the employed and the unemployed, are from The Labour Force, 
a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics which also contains additional details of 
the characteristics of the labour force, together with definitions and explanatory notes. 

(b) Centres of 5,000 population or more. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



115 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Older Workers 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

of Older Disabled Persons 

Little-known feature of Canada's federal-provincial program 
of vocational rehabilitation services for disabled persons is 
that it has no upper age limit. Of 1,814 cases of successful 
rehabilitation in 1962-63, more than 400 were aged 45 or more 



Canada's federal-provincial program of 
vocational rehabilitation services for dis- 
abled persons is fairly well-known. What 
is not so well-known is that the program 
has no upper age limits. Many persons of 
advanced age have been and are being suc- 
cessfully rehabilitated, many to suitable 
employment. 

It is widely accepted that age in itself 
can be a significant social handicap to ob- 
taining or returning to gainful employment. 
When this handicap is coupled with a physi- 
cal disability the odds against a return to 
self-sustaining status are multiplied. 

In view of those difficulties, success in 
even a relatively small number of cases is 
significant and offers ample evidence that 
older, and sometimes quite elderly disabled 
persons can become self-sustaining. If it can 
be done for those with disabilities what 
might be accomplished for those who are 
able-bodied and in good health? 

Of 1,814 cases of successful rehabilitation 
reported in 1962-63, 407 or 22.7 per cent 
were aged 45 or over. Of this number, 267 
were men and 140 were women. Eighty- 
four of these older people, 46 men and 38 
women, were in the age group 66 and over; 
121, of whom 82 were men and 39 women, 
were in the 56-65 age group; the remaining 
202 — 139 men and 63 women — were aged 
from 45 to 55 (see table, Part A). 

These older people suffered from various 
types of disabilities in the following clas- 
sifications: amputations, neuro-muscular- 
skeletal, hearing, seeing, neurological, 
respiratory, cardio-vascular and neuro- 
psychiatric problems (see table). 

Despite these disabilities and their 
advanced ages, 227 of them — 184 men and 
43 women — were rehabilitated into gainful 
employment and the remainder were enabled 
to look after their own needs or to assume 
their normal roles as housewives (see table, 
Part B). 

The types of occupations entered by these 
227 disabled older people is significant also. 
Nine men and two women entered the pro- 
fessional and managerial field; 40 men and 
11 women became sales persons or clerical 
personnel; 37 men and 26 women were 



placed in service occupations; 22 men went 
into agriculture, fishery or forestry occupa- 
tions; 30 men and 1 woman became skilled 
workers; 12 men and 1 woman became 
semi-skilled workers; and 34 men and 2 
women were placed in unskilled occupa- 
tions. 

Part 3 of the table indicates that 
rehabilitation services take time. For 
71 of these older disabled persons more 
than 24 months were required; but for 143 
less than six months were needed. 

The numbers involved were relatively 
few but still represented a significant pro- 
portion (22.7%) of all cases reported to 
Civilian Rehabilitation, Department of 
Labour, in 1962-63. 

The following case histories are typical. 

Case 1 — Mr. X, aged 63, with a Grade 
9 to 10 education, had had arteriosclerotic 
gangrene necessitating above-knee amputa- 
tion of the right leg. His previous occupa- 
tion had been toolmaker. His rehabilitation 
services, which lasted nine months, included 
surgery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy 
and an artificial limb. He was enabled to 
return to tool and die making, earning $347 
monthly. 

Case 2 — Mr. Y, aged 65, had educational 
qualifications ranging from the equivalent 
of Grades 5 to 8. His disability was inter- 
vertebral disc deterioration in the lumbar 
region. He suffered back pains and had dif- 
ficulty in walking. The disability began in 
1958. He had been a labourer, but was on 
public assistance at acceptance for rehabili- 
tation services. After eight months of medi- 
cal treatment and physiotherapy he was 
placed in unskilled labour at $300 a month. 

Case 3 — Mr. A, aged 71, has educational 
equivalents Grades 5 to 8. His disability was 
vascular deficiency, necessitating amputation 
of the left leg below the knee. On Old Age 
Security, he was formerly a labourer. 
Rehabilitation services took eight months 
and included surgery, provision of an arti- 
ficial limb and counselling, after which he 
became self-employed at odd jobs, sup- 
plementing his old age pension by about 
$25 monthly. 

{Continued on page 161) 



116 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



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THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



117 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



Collective Bargaining, Fourth Quarter, 1963 



During the fourth quarter of 1963, col- 
lective bargaining in Canada led to nearly 40 
major settlements covering approximately 
80,000 workers in a wide range of industries. 

Three of these settlements brought an 
end to strikes of longshoremen at St. 
Lawrence River ports, and at two manu- 
facturing plants in St. Jerome, Que. Other 
major agreements signed during the period 
included contracts covering employees in 
air transportation, telephone communica- 
tions and uranium mining. 

Contract negotiations affecting more than 
120,000 workers in the railway industry 
were opened during the quarter with 16 
unions presenting their proposals to the 
major companies. 

In the longshoring industry, approxi- 
mately 3,800 port workers at Montreal, 
Quebec and Three Rivers returned to work 
October 14 after a ten-day strike against 
member companies of the Shipping Federa- 
tion of Canada. The strike came to an end 
when members of the International Long- 
shoremen's Association, which had been 
negotiating with the Shipping Federation 
for nearly a year for the renewal of con- 
tracts that had expired on December 31, 
1962, voted to accept settlement terms 
recommended by Judge Rene Lippe, federal 
mediator in the dispute. 

The settlement gave wage increases of 
30 cents an hour to longshoremen at 
Montreal and Quebec, 39 cents an hour to 
longshoremen at Three Rivers, 33 cents an 
hour to checkers at Quebec, and 34 cents 
an hour to checkers at Montreal in new 
three-year agreements. In addition, premium 
pay clauses were amended. Rates for Satur- 
day work, previously straight time until 
noon, were changed to time and one half 
all day; for work from midnight to 5 a.m., 
previously time and one half, to double 
time. The formula for vacation pay is to be 
4 per cent of gross earnings in lieu of the 
previous 8 cents per man-hour worked. The 
employers will also increase their contri- 
bution from 29 cents to 33 cents per man- 
hour worked toward the pension, welfare 
and vacation plans. 

An important part of the settlement is 
provision for an enquiry into the admin- 
istration and operation of the Shipping 
Federation of Canada-ILA trust funds, as 
recommended by a conciliation board the 
previous month (L.G., Oct. 1963, p. 886). 



At the outset of negotiations, the Shipping 
Federation bargained with an ILA com- 
mittee representing about 4,000 workers at 
Halifax and 2,800 workers at Saint John 
as well as employees at the St. Lawrence 
River ports. Agreement was reached last 
February — the proposed terms included 
annual wage increases of 5 cents an hour 
and annual increases of 2 cents an hour 
in company contributions to the welfare 
plan in a two-year contract — but the terms 
were rejected by the union locals at 
Montreal, Quebec and Three Rivers. 

The union locals at Halifax and Saint 
John, however, accepted these proposals 
tentatively with the understanding that fur- 
ther meetings would be held if a different 
settlement were negotiated for the St. 
Lawrence River ports. 

In November, negotiations between the 
Shipping Federation and the Halifax and 
Saint John locals were reopened and the 
employer representatives proposed terms 
along the lines of the Montreal settlement. 
The terms were subsequently accepted by 
the longshoremen. 

Two strikes involving approximately 
1,800 workers at St. Jerome, Que., ended 
during the quarter with the signing of new 
agreements between the Rubber Workers 
and Dominion Rubber in October and the 
Textile Workers' Union and Regent Knitting 
Mills in December. 

The work stoppage at the Dominion 
Rubber plant had begun in September and 
lasted six weeks until a settlement was 
ratified by members of the Textile Workers' 
Union. The new agreement is for a term of 
three years and gives wage increases of 11 
cents an hour to male employees and 9 
cents an hour to female employees, and a 
reduction in the work week from 45 to 44 
hours. Other terms of settlement include 
an increase in the night shift premium to 
7 cents from 5 cents an hour, a minimum 
monthly pension of $97.50, which had 
previously been $87.50, and a reduction in 
the qualifying period for four weeks vaca- 
tion from 25 to 22 years of service. 

At Regent Knitting Mills, an 18-week 
strike that had started in August ended with 
the signing of a three-year contract giving 
general wage increases amounting to 14 
cents an hour and classification adjustments 
ranging from 4 to 43 cents an hour. 
Furthermore, the work week is to be 



This review is prepared by the Collective Bargaining Section, Labour-Management 
Division, of the Economics and Research Branch. 



118 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



reduced from 49 to 45 hours in two steps 
for about 80 workers and from 48 to 46£ 
hours in two steps for some 200 workers, 
with other employees remaining on a 45- 
hour work week. Provision is also made 
for three weeks vacation after 18 years of 
service in 1964, after 17 years of service in 
1965 and after 16 years of service in 1966. 

Collective bargaining with Canada's 
major railways was opened in November as 
existing contracts of 15 unions representing 
non-operating employees and of the 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen were due 
to expire December 31. 

When contract negotiations began, 14 
of the non-operating employees unions sub- 
mitted their proposals jointly to the CNR, 
CPR and other railways on behalf of 80,000 
employees of the companies. The Canadian 
Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and 
General Workers, bargaining agent for 
about 22,000 non-operating employees of 
the CNR and the Ontario Northland Rail- 
way, later presented its demands separately. 
In previous years, the CBRT had entered 
negotiations along with the other unions; 
this year it withdrew from joint bargaining 
in November. 

According to newspaper reports, the non- 
operating employees unions were seeking a 
one-year agreement that would establish 
parity between their average hourly rates 
and wages paid in such durable goods in- 
dustries as wood products, iron and steel 
products, transportation equipment, non- 
ferrous metal products and electrical 
apparatus and supplies manfuacturing. The 
CBRT requested, in addition, longer vaca- 
tions, a new system for sick leave, increases 
in health and welfare benefits, and a job 
freeze for employees with more than five 
years of service. 

In November, Bell Telephone negotiated 
five company-wide agreements with its 
independent employees' associations — the 
Canadian Telephone Employees' Associa- 
tion, representing clerical and associated 
employees, communications sales employees 
and craft and services employees, and the 
Traffic Employees' Association, bargaining 
agent for telephone operators and dining 
service personnel. 

More than 27,000 workers in numerous 
centres in Ontario and Quebec are covered 
by the new contracts, which supersede agree- 
ments that had expired in November. With 
the exception of the agreement covering 
telephone operators, which is for a term of 
15 months, all contracts are of one year's 
duration. 

The agreement covering employees in 
clerical and associated occupations gives 
wage increases ranging from $1 to $2.75 a 
week on top salary rates and from $1.50 to 



$4.50 a week on starting salaries, such in- 
creases varying according to the grades and 
localities of the employees. 

The wage increases granted to com- 
munications sales employees amount to 
$18 a month in all localities plus an addi- 
tional $6 a month in communities other 
than Toronto, Montreal and Windsor. 

In the bargaining unit comprising craft 
and services employees, wage increases of 
up to $3 a week on starting rates and of 
$2.25 to 3.50 a week on top rates, depend- 
ing on the localities and classes of em- 
ployees, were granted as a result of the 
settlement. 

Under the agreement applying to traffic 
operators, wage increases on top salaries 
range from $1.25 to $2.50 a week, depend- 
ing on locality. The agreement negotiated 
by the Traffic Employees' Association on 
behalf of dining service employees provides 
for wage increases of $1.50 to $2 a week 
on top rates for female employees and of 
$2.25 a week for male employees, and wage 
increases on starting rates for female em- 
ployees of $2.50 to $5 a week and for 
male employees of $1.75 a week. 

During the quarter, TCA negotiated two 
major settlements. One of these agreements, 
with the Canadian Air Line Flight 
Attendants' Association, is for a 20-month 
term and provides for annual salary in- 
creases of 2i per cent. Included in the con- 
tract is a new rule that stewardesses and 
pursers based in Montreal will be required 
by May 1, 1965 to be bilingual; the com- 
pany will provide courses of instruction. 

The other TCA settlement resulted from 
negotiations on a mid-term wage reopener 
provided in a two-year agreement with the 
Machinists. The agreement covers about 
4,400 employees in the maintenance and 
overhaul, station services and stores depart- 
ments of the company. 

In October and November a conciliation 
board assisted in the negotiations. In its 
report, the board noted that this was the 
first time in the 14-year history of col- 
lective bargaining between TCA and the 
Machinists that the two parties required the 
services of a conciliation board, and com- 
mended the existing relationship. In Decem- 
ber a settlement was reached and ratified by 
the union membership. It gives increases of 
4 per cent effective November 5, 1963 and 
provides for settlement pay of $60 prorated 
from July 2, 1963 for employees on the 
payroll November 27. 

In December, the United Steelworkers 
and Denison Mines, with assistance from a 
conciliation board, reached a settlement 
covering approximately 870 employees at 
Elliot Lake, Ont. The new agreement is of 
two years duration and provides for a wage 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



119 



increase of 5 cents an hour in September 
1964 and an additional wage increase of 2 
cents an hour for hoistmen with com- 
pressor's papers. 

During negotiations, an important issue 
in dispute had been a provision for separa- 
tion allowances. Previously, the separation 
allowance was $6 per month of service to 
a maximum of $400. The union was request- 
ing that the $400 limit be removed. Under 
the new agreement, continuity pay for em- 
ployees in the bargaining unit will be a 
maximum of $450 up to September 1, 1964 
and $500 after that date, to be accumulated 
at the rate of $6 a month of continuous 
service by employees from their last date of 
hiring to the expiry date of the agreement. 
Employees who have more than six months 
of continuous service with the company 
will qualify for continuity pay. No severance 
pay shall be granted, however, unless the 
severance is directly due to a complete shut- 
down. 

To obtain severance pay, the employee 
must remain in the employ of the company 



until his services are permanently severed 
for the above reasons. The obligation of the 
company to pay severance pay will cease at 
the termination of the agreement on August 
30, 1965. 

At an annual convention of the United 
Packinghouse Workers held in Vancouver 
during October, the delegates approved pro- 
posals for submission to meat packing com- 
panies in forthcoming negotiations. Con- 
tracts between the union and Burns and 
Company, Canada Packers and Swift Cana- 
dian are due to expire in March 1964. 

The proposals formulated include: a 
reduction in the 40-hour work week to 37£ 
hours, an increase in the night shift premium 
from 12 cents to 21 cents an hour, up to 
six weeks vacation after 25 years of serv- 
ice, double pay for vacation taken outside 
the summer months, sabbatical leave of 
13 weeks every five years for employees 
with 15 years of service, elimination of part- 
time work, wedding and bereavement pay 
for three days, voluntary overtime and 
separation pay. 



Major Settlements in 1963 



During 1963, collective bargaining in 
Canada in industries outside the construc- 
tion sector resulted in 211 major settle- 
ments — those covering bargaining units of 
500 or more employees — and produced 
new contracts for approximately 293,000 
workers. More than half of these settle- 
ments were negotiated in manufacturing 
industries, and close to 20 per cent were 
signed in the service sector, which includes 



such employers as municipal and provincial 
governments, hotels, hospitals and educa- 
tional institutions. 

Most of the major agreements reached 
during the year were signed for a two- or 
three-year term; two-year contracts pre- 
dominated. Only 43 out of the 211 major 
agreements were for a period of one year. 

Twenty-five of the major settlements gave 
no general wage increases but provided for 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING 1963, BY INDUSTRY 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more employees concluded between January 1 and December 31, 1963 ex- 
cluding agreements in the construction industry and agreements with wage terms in piece or mileage rates only. The 
data are based on preliminary reports where copies of new collective agreements had not been received before compilation. 



Industry and 


Term of Agreement in Months 


Total Wage 
Increase in Cents 


Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27-32 


33 and over 


per HourU) 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Forestry 

1 


2 

1 
1 


1,000 
600 
600 


















5 


















6 


















9 






1 

1 


1,600 
500 










11 














1 


2,000 


13 






1 


500 








14 






1 
5 

2 

1 
1 
2 


800 
4,950 

1,250 

900 

2,290 

6,500 










17 










3 


1,750 






Mining 
















5 


















8 


















13 


















17... 














\ 


2,200 


18 


















1,500 


19 


















13,500 


21 










1 


1,600 






2,000 



















120 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING 1963, BY INDUSTRY— Concluded 



Industry and 


Term of Agreement in Months 


Total Wage 
Increase in Cents 


Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27-32 


33 and over 


per Hour' 1 ' 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Manufacturing 




5 


4,590 






16 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 
2 
8 
3 
3 
3 
1 
5 


24,890 
500 
1,900 
3,400 
730 
4,220 
2,850 
7,900 
1,200 
8,220 
2,700 
2,600 
3,400 
1,400 
3,580 






1 


500 


2 












3 


3 
2 
2 


2,800 
1,050 
1,250 














4 . 














5 










1 


2,700 


6 












7 


3 
3 


5,260 
6,200 














8 










1 


900 


9 












10 














3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 


11,120 


11 














1,200 


12 














1,100 


13 . 














2,530 


14 














530 


15 














1,100 


16 














2,000 


17 










2 

1 


2,300 
600 






500 


18... 














2,450 


19 














800 


20 










1 
2 

1 


800 

1,100 

850 






1,080 


21.. 
















23 


















24 










1 


1,000 


2 

1 


1,200 


25 














1,100 


32 












600 








Transportation, 
Storage and 
Communication 




1 

2 

1 

1 
3 


540 
1,230 
980 
1,400 
8,100 
15,100 
4,400 














1 


















2 


















3 


1 


8,500 


1 


500 










4 










6 


1 


1,200 


1 
2 
2 


750 
1,300 
2,900 










8 










10 














12 














1 


2,100 


13 










1 


1,000 








15 










1 


4,300 






16 


1 


500 














19 






1 


500 










30 














1 
1 


5,400 


44 


















2,400 


Public Utility 
Operation 

8 


1 


840 










1 


1,500 




10 






3 


2,700 






12 










1 


1,300 






Trade 

3 










1 
1 


1,000 
1,500 






11 


















15 














1 


1,400 


18 










1 

1 


900 
2,480 








Service 

1 


















4 


1 
2 
3 


630 
2,380 
3,480 














5 






1 


500 










6 










1 

2 


750 


7 






2 
5 
3 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 


3,300 

5,930 

2,510 

600 

700 

3,250 

5,700 

630 






1 000 


9 


1 


1,710 












10 










1 
1 


500 


11 










600 


12 
















13 


















14 


















15 


1 
1 


5,000 
800 














16 














17 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


3,700 
500 
750 
650 
800 










18 


















19 


















28 


















30 




































Total 


43 


70,440(2) 


3 


10,200 


119 


141,180 


7 


9,850 


39 


66,160 



W The wage increases shown relate only to base rates, i.e., labour rates or their equivalent. Fractions of a cent are 
rounded to nearest cent. The data on the number of employees covered are approximate and include all classifications 
covered by the agreement. 

W Includes two bargaining units (600 and 4,400 employees) for which two wage settlements were concluded during 
1963. The number of employees in each of these bargaining units appears twice in the table. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



121 



other improvements. Most of the settlements About two-thirds of the 43 major one- 

that provided no general wage increase year agreements signed during the year 

were in the pulp and paper industry in gave wage increases of 3 to 8 cents an hour 

eastern Canada; their main features were on labour rates. 

classification adjustments for skilled trades- Of the 119 major two-year agreements 
men, higher shift premiums, provisions for reached in 1963, more than half provided 
jury-duty pay, shorter qualifying periods for for labour rate increases ranging upward 
four weeks vacation, higher company con- from 10 cents an hour, 
tributions toward hospital and medical in- In about one-third of the 39 three-year 
surance plans, and improvements in contracts, wage increases of 10 to 14 cents 
group life insurance and pension benefits. an hour on labour rates or their equivalent 
A few settlements in this industry, however, were provided for; in one-half of the three- 
provided for wage increases ranging from year contracts, wage increases ranging up- 
2 to 6 cents an hour. ward from 15 cents an hour. 

Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During February, March and April 

(except those under negotiation in January) 

Company and Location Union 

Anglo-Nfld. Development, Bowater's Nfld. Pulp 

& Paper, Nfld. Contractors' Assn., Nfld. . Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC (loggers) 

Assn. Patronale du Commerce (Hardware), 

Quebec, Que. Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Burns & Co. (Eastern), Kitchener, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC 

Canada Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. Celanese, Drummondville, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNR, system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind). 

CNR, system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

Cdn. Westinghouse, Hamilton, Ont UE (Ind.) 

Cdn. International Paper (Gatineau Woods Div.), 
Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Cdn. International Paper (St. Maurice Woods 

Div.), Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Cascapedia Mfg. & Trading, Gaspe Peninsula, 

Que. Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ont CLC-chartered local 

Dominion Stores, Hamilton & other centres, Ont. Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar Newsprint, Dolbeau, Que Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Domtar Pulp & Paper, East Angus, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Domtar Pulp & Paper (Howard Smith Paper 

Div.), Cornwall, Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & 

Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Domtar Pulp & Paper (Kraft & Boxboard Div.), 

Windsor, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

E.B. Eddy, Hull, Que Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Fisheries Assn. & cold storage cos., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) & Native Brotherhood 

(Ind.) (shore wkrs.) 

Fisheries Assn., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) (tendermen) 

Food stores (various), Vancouver, Victoria & 

New Westminster, B.C. Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Halifax Shipyards (Dosco), Halifax & Dartmouth, 

N.S Marine Wkrs. (CLC) 

Kimberly-Clark Paper, Terrace Bay, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

& IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Legrade Inc. & Eastern Abattoirs, Montreal & 

Quebec, Que Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lever, Bros., Toronto, Ont. Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC/ (traffic empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical & 

maintenance empl.) 

Moirs Limited & Moirs Sales, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Ontario-Minnesota Paper, Fort Frances & 

Kenora, Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

122 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



Company and Location Union 

Power Super Markets, Hamilton, Oshawa & 

Toronto, Ont Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Provincial Paper, Thorold, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(inside empl.) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(outside empl.) 

RCA Victor, Montreal, Que IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ready-mix concrete companies, Toronto, Ont. .. Teamsters (Ind.) 

Rolland Paper, Mt. Rolland & St. Jerome, Que. Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Spruce Falls & Kimberly-Clark, Kapuskasing, 

Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During January 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Assn. Patronale des Inst. Religieuses (5 hospitals), 

St. Hyacinthe & other centres, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Assn. Patronale des Mfrs. de Chaussures, Quebec, 

Que Leather & Shoe Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers, garages (various), Vancouver, B.C. Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Automatic Electric, Brockville, Ont IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Bowater's Nfld. Pulp & Paper, Corner Brook, 

Nfld Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

B.C. Telephone B.C. Telephone Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Burns & Co. (6 plants), Western Canada Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Cobourg & Oakville, Ont. IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Montreal & Quebec, Que. IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNR, CPR & other railways 15 unions (non-operating empl.) 

Cdn. Vickers (Engineering Div.), Montreal, Que. Boilermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Machinists 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Cdn. Vickers, Montreal, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Canada Packers (8 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cluett Peabody, Kitchener & Stratford, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting, Trail, Kimber- 

ley, Riondel & Salmo, B.C Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Crane Limited, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Davie Shipbuilding, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

G.T. Davie & Sons, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Dominion Corset, Quebec, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Dominion Engineering, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Steel & Coal, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Stores, Toronto & other centres, Ont. Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Textile, Montreal, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dupuis Freres, Montreal, Que Commerce & Office Empl. (CNTU) 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Glove Mfrs. Assn., Loretteville, Montreal, St. 

Raymond & St. Tite, Que. Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Hamilton General Hospitals, Hamilton, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Hollinger Gold Mines, Timmins, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (10), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

International Nickel, Thompson, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO-CLC) 

Kelly, Douglas & Co., Vancouver & other centres, 

B.C Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Manitoba Rolling Mill, Selkirk, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marine Industries, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel., company-wide, N.S IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Montreal Cottons, Valleyfield, Que. United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Northern Electric, London, Ont Empl. Assn., (Ind.) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, Ottawa, Ont. Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Philips Electronics, Leaside, Ont IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Polymer Corp., Sarnia, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission, Montreal & 

other centres, Que. Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Regina General Hospital, Regina, Sask Public Empl. (CLC) 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Swift Cdn. (6 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Board of Education, Toronto, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (caretakers) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 123 



Company and Location Union 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Metro, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto Metro, Ont. Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

University Hospital, Saskatoon, Sask Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. ... Public Empl. (CLC) 
Vancouver Police Commissioners Board, Van- 
couver, B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Winnipeg Metro., Man Public Empl. (CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont..... Teamsters (Ind.) 

CBC, company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 
Cdn. General Electric, Guelph, Peterborough & 

Toronto, Ont UE (Ind.) 

Cdn. Steel Foundries, Montreal, Que Steel & Foundry Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum, Montreal, Que. CNTU-chartered local 
Dominion Textile, Montmorency, Sherbrooke, 

Magog & Drummondville, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Handbag Mfrs. Council, Montreal, Que Leather & Plastic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Nfld. Employers' Assn., St. John's, Nfld Longshoremen's Protective Union (Ind.) 

Page-Hersey Tubes, Welland, Ont UE (Ind.) 

Smith & Stone, Georgetown, Ont Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Soo-Security Motorways, Ont., Man., Sask. & 

Alta. Teamsters (Ind.) 

Winnipeg Metro (Transit Dept.), Man Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

CBC, company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cyanamid of Canada (Welland Plant), Niagara 

Falls, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domil Limited, Sherbrooke, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

DuPont of Canada, Maitland, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines, Schumacher, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, 
B.C Various unions 

Arbitration 

Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, (5 
hospitals), Drummondville & other centres, 

Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, Que- 
bec, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (female 

empl.) 
Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, Que- 
bec, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (male 

empl.) 
Hospitals (13), Montreal & other centres, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) (registered 

nurses) 

Hotel Dieu St. Vallier, Chicoutimi, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Quebec Natural Gas, Montreal, Que Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Work Stoppage 

(No cases during January) 

Part 111— Settlements Reached During January 

Turn to page 175 



124 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



Women's Bureau 



Education and Training of Girls in Britain 

Women in Britain today spend more years in paid work outside 
home. Two recent studies of educational programs for girls 
deal with training in industry and total preparation of girls 



Women of today's generation in Britain 
are spending more years in paid work out- 
side the home. More free time from family 
duties, coupled with thriving economic 
conditions in the country, have created a 
new situation that has brought a pressing 
need to re-appraise educational programs 
for girls. Of special interest are two recent 
studies directed to this end. 

The first of these, "Training Girls in 
Industry," a 35-page booklet published by 
the Industrial Training Council*, stresses 
the advantages of organized training pro- 
grams for girls in industry. For employers 
it is sound business, as, in a competitive 
labour market, companies offering the best 
training schemes attract the better candi- 
dates. 

Such training programs ease the transi- 
tion from school to work. Well-planned use 
of time reduces the instruction period and 
minimizes waste of materials. A higher 
standard of work, increased production, 
lower turnover rate and improved morale 
bring further benefits to management. 

The trainees themselves improve their 
earning capacity as a result of learning 
quick, safe and correct methods of work. 
Prospects of promotion are also greater for 
well-trained workers. And for young women 
who marry and later wish to return to work, 
proficiency gained when they were young 
should facilitate re-entry into the labour 
force. 

The best training schemes combined on- 
the-job training with study at a technical 
college. They were based on a thorough 
study and analysis of the work to be done. 
Trainees were selected with full regard for 
aptitude and suitability, and well qualified 
instructors provided. Special induction pro- 
grams and release during working hours for 
attendance at technical colleges eased the 
transition from school to work. 

The second study, "the Education and 
Training of Girls" t, was undertaken by a 
working party of women versed in the needs 
of the community rather than being expert 
in the field of education. Their concern was 
with the total preparation of girls, testing its 

* Set up by the British Employers' Confederation 
in 1958. 

t A study by the Women's Group on Public Wel- 
fare, published by the National Council of Social 
Service, 26 Bedford Square, London, W.C. 1. 



adequacy for their future roles in a chang- 
ing society — at home, at work and as 
citizens. Views were sought from school 
principals, teachers, employers, social 
workers and youth organizations as well as 
parents and girls themselves. 

One headmistress of a grammar school 
described the expectations of her girls, aged 
15 to 18, as: early marriage, a family, and 
work outside the home. She said that the 
girls were interested in housewifely arts but 
viewed them as a "co-operative enterprise" 
in which husbands and children would share. 

Home economics teachers proposed a 
course on Preparation for Marriage and 
Home Life, to be followed by another on 
Preparation for the Community Life. They 
were of the opinion that every girl should 
have some knowledge of these wider aspects 
of living before leaving school, and that 
boys, too, would benefit from such courses. 

Discussions with employers revealed fre- 
quent lack of preparation for first jobs. 
Girls whose standards were not high enough 
to enter clerical and secretarial work had 
been accepted because of desperate shortages 
of personnel. In the London area, it was 
found there were 30 such jobs for every 
girl applicant. 

School girls themselves believed that 
education gave one greater scope in choos- 
ing a career and enabled one to earn a good 
living. Many of those who had recently left 
school had already realized that education 
does not end with school graduation — one 
must "go on learning all through life." 

Although fewer girls than boys were 
receiving formal post high-school educa- 
tion, the numbers of women attending even- 
ing institutes, where they far outnumbered 
men, suggested eagerness to continue with 
further education if given the opportunity. 

The women's group ruled out "soft op- 
tions" for girls; they should have the best 
education they can get before marriage and 
have ready access to further education and 
training in later life. There should be 
equal opportunities for women in the uni- 
versities and in the professions. 

For girls, more and varied schemes of 
"day release" for further education were 
recommended. Also, the schools should give 
more attention to advising girls about 
careers and opportunities for employment. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

73933-4—3 



FEBRUARY 7964 



125 



TEUIWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



"It works. It fills a need. It's in its 20th 
year. We intend to keep it." Frank Gresty, 
personnel manager at the drug firm of John 
Wyeth & Brother (Canada) Limited, used 
this capsule comment recently to sum up 
the Windsor plant's assessment of its Em- 
ployees' Operational Committee. 

Union spokesman Roy Girard expressed 
similar sentiments. Mr. Girard is chairman 
of Local 9-368, Oil, Chemical and Atomic 
Workers' International Union (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC). "Joint consultation has a definite 
place in industry", he declared. "It is good 
for the general welfare of the whole group. 
People need to be in contact with each other 
on the job." 

Founded 1944 

Founded in 1944, the EOC's main 
responsibility is to promote employee co- 
operation in production, efficiency, attend- 
ance, safety, good housekeeping and sug- 
gestions, and to sponsor sports, entertain- 
ment and a variety of special projects — one 
of which, by way of example, was an em- 
ployee course in civic administration. 

A true joint consultation committee in all 
its functions, the group is composed of 10 
elected employee members, the company 
president, personnel manager, plant chair- 
man and two department managers. 

The committee convenes on two occasions 
each month. One of them is a dinner meet- 
ing featuring a banquet and floor show as 
a suitable aftermath to business. 

In addition to the regular members of the 
Employees' Operational Committee, two 
guests are invited, one from among plant, 
the other from among office personnel. 
Priority is determined by the date on which 
an employee joined the company. 

Eventually all personnel will have been 
guests of the committee. The plan is aimed 
primarily at the preservation and extension 
of the company's team spirit. At the same 
time, personnel are thereby introduced 
gradually to the responsibilities they will 
one day assume when their turn comes to 
serve on the committee. 



There are special reasons behind the 
name for the committee. Its title, Em- 
ployees' Operational Committee, repre- 
sents an attempt to get away from what 
are described as "unnecessary distinctions" 
among employees. 

As personnel manager Frank Fresty ex- 
plained it recently: "We think that talk of 
•labour' and of 'management' sets up bar- 
riers. It implies two factions. Our idea is to 
avoid distinctions between plant and cleri- 
cal and supervisory personnel. What we 
have here is a team, and we want to keep it 
that way." 

Team Concept 

The Wyeth firm is solidly for this team 
concept. Management spokesmen point out 
that every member of the organization is 
essential — "otherwise he wouldn't be on 
our payroll." They emphasize that it is 
important that the good housekeeper and 
the chief chemist do their jobs equally well. 

Consistent co-operation and stability are 
the keynote of employee-employer relations 
at John Wyeth, according to one manage- 
ment spokesman. 

During a recent interview, Frank Gresty 
stated that the team spirit of the firm's 200 
employees shines through, both on the job 
and off. 

Of the roughly 150 suggestions and ideas 
submitted by personnel each year, 70 to 75 
per cent receive some form of recognition 
or award for their utility. Practical sugges- 
tions take the major share, of course, but 
management believes that "good thinking" 
deserves encouragement too. 

Teamwork among plant and office em- 
ployees has also led to an impressive safety 
record. The first million hours of "no lost- 
time accidents" was passed in September 
1962. The latest figure made public stands 
at close to 1,500,000 hours. Management 
says the credit belongs jointly to the com- 
mittee's safety program and enthusiastic em- 
ployee response to that program. 

On the social side of life, it is not uncom- 
mon for Wyeth personnel, relatives and 
friends to show up at the annual "family 
Night" in numbers over 500 strong. 

There is a similar keen participation in 
bowling, swimming and other sports and 
entertainment organized by the plant Em- 
ployees' Operational Committee. 



Establishment of Labour-Management Committees is encouraged and assisted by the 
Labour-Management Co-operation Service, Industrial Relations Branch, Department of 
Labour. In addition to field representatives located in key industrial centres, who are 
available to help both managements and trade unions, the Service provides various aids in 
the form of booklets, posters and films. 



126 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



CERTIFICATION AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board 
met for three days during December. The 
Board issued four certifications designating 
bargaining agents, ordered one representa- 
tion vote, rejected three applications for 
certification, and granted one application 
for revocation of certification. During the 
month the Board received 17 applications 
for certification and allowed the withdrawal 
of three applications for certification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. National Association of Broadcast 
Employees and Technicians, on behalf of a 
unit of maintenance technicians and pro- 
gram operators at Radio Station CHML, 
Hamilton, Ont., employed by Maple Leaf 
Broadcasting Company Limited (L.G., 
Dec. 1963, p. 1109). 

2. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of bargemen employed by Van- 
couver Tug Boat Co. Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. 
(L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 1110). 

3. District 50, United Mine Workers of 
America, Local Union 13946, on behalf of 
a unit of building cleaners and maintenance 
men employed by Central Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation at its Domaine Etria 
and Pavilion Mercier projects in Montreal, 
Que. The application had also included the 
Place Gouin project in Montreal, but the 
Board deemed that the appropriate unit 
should not include these employees (L.G., 
Dec. 1963, p. 1110). 

4. Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
on behalf of a unit of locomotive engineers 
employed by The Algoma Central and Hud- 
son Bay Railway Company, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont. (L.G, Dec. 1963, p. 1110). 

Representation Vote Ordered 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
applicant, The Algoma Central and Hudson 
Bay Railway Company, Sault Ste. Marie, 
respondent, and the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Firemen and Enginemen, intervener. 
The Board directed that both the name of 
the applicant and the intervener appear on 
the ballot (L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 1110) 
(Returning Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 



Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. International Longshoremen's Associa- 
tion, Local 1657, applicant, and various 
companies as represented by The Shipping 
Federation of Canada, Incorporated, 
respondents (L.G., July 1963, p. 601) (see 
"Reasons for Judgment," below). 

2. Transport Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers' Union, Local 106, of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, applicant, and Hubert Transport 
Inc., Ste. Therese, Que., respondent (L.G., 
Dec. 1963, p. 1109). The application was 
rejected for the reason that it was not sup- 
ported by a majority of the employees af- 
fected in the representation vote conducted 
by the Board. 

3. Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers, Local No. 91 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, applicant, and John L. Bray, 
Ottawa, Ont., respondent (mail service) 
(L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 1109). The applica- 
tion was rejected for the reason that it was 
not supported by a majority of the em- 
ployees affected in the representation vote 
conducted by the Board. 

Application for Revocation Granted 

The Board granted an application for 
revocation of certification affecting Tiger 
Transfer Ltd., Calgary, Alta., applicant, 
and Dairymen, Warehousemen, Cartage- 
men, Truckers and Helpers, Local Union 
No. 987, of the International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers of America, respondent (L.G., 
Dec. 1963, p. 1110). Local 987, the certi- 
fied bargaining agent, did not contest the 
application. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. United Steelworkers of America, Local 
5115, on behalf of a unit of longshoremen 
employed by Kitimat Wharves Limited, 
Kitimat, B.C. (Investigating Officer: D. S. 
Tysoe). 

2. National Syndicate of Employees of 
Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd., on behalf of 
a unit of employees of Ogilvie Flour Mills 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 
73933-4— 3J 



FEBRUARY J 964 



127 



Co. Ltd., Montreal, Que. (Investigating United Mine Workers of America, on 

Officer: Miss M.-P. Bigras). behalf of a unit of operating engineers em- 

3. National Syndicate of Employees of ployed by Robin Hood Flour Mills Ltd., 
Robin Hood Flour Mills Ltd., on behalf of Montreal, Que. (Investigating Officer: Miss 
a unit of employees of Robin Hood Flour M.-P. Bigras). 

Mills Ltd., Montreal, Que. (Investigating 7. office Employees' International Union, 

Officer: Miss M.-P. Bigras). Local 15, on behalf of a unit of office em- 

4. General Truck Drivers and Helpers' ployees of Canadian Freightways Limited, 
Union, Local 31 of the International Calgary, Alta., employed at its North 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Burnaby, B.C. terminal (Investigating 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, on Officer: G. H. Purvis). 

behalf of a unit of employees of Tourist 8 Brotherhood of R ai i wa y and Steam- 
Services Ltd., Whitehorse, Y.T. (see ship Clerks5 Freight Handlers, Express and 
"Applications for Certification Withdrawn, Stadon EmployeeSj on beha lf of a unit of 
below) (Investigating Officer: G. H. Pur- employees of Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd., 
v * s )- Montreal, Que. (Investigating Officer: Miss 

5. National Syndicate of Employees of ^ _p Bigras) 

Quebec Air Transport on behalf of a unit - Brotherhood of Railway and Steam . 

of employees of Quebecair Inc., Rimouski , . _ t t _ . - . TT „ _ , 

East, Que., employed in its traffic, mainten- shl P Clerks ' Frei S ht H ^dlers Express and 

ance, and operations departments (Investi- Statlon Employees, on behalf of a unit of 

gating Officer: R. L. Fournier). employees of Robin Hood Flour Mills 

6. National Union of Operating Engineers Limited, Montreal, Que. (Investigating 
of Canada, Local 14850, District 50, Officer: Miss M.-P. Bigras). 

Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 

Conciliation services under the Industrial relations and Disputes Investigation Act 
are provided by the Minister of Labour through the Industrial Relations Branch. The 
branch also acts as the administrative arm of the Canada Labour Relations Board in 
matters under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act came into force on September 
1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, which became 
effective in March, 1944, and repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, which 
had been in force from 1907 until superseded by the Wartime Regulations in 1944. 
Decisions, orders and certificates given under the Wartime Regulations by the Minister 
of Labour and the Wartime Labour Relations Board are continued in force and effect by 
the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, interprovincial and international steamship lines 
and ferries, aerodromes and air transportation, radio broadcasting stations and works 
declared by Parliament to be for the general advantage of Canada or two or more of 
its provinces. Additionally, the Act provides that provincial authorities, if they so desire, may 
enact similar legislation for application to industries within provincial jurisdiction and 
make mutually satisfactory arrangements with the federal Government for the administra- 
tion of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of conciliation officers, conciliation boards, and Industrial 
Inquiry Commissions concerning complaints that the Act has been violated or that a party 
has failed to bargain collectively, and for controlling applications for consent to prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is established under the Act as successor to 
the Wartime Labour Relations Board to administer provisions concerning the certification 
of bargaining agents; the writing of provisions — for incorporation into collective agree- 
ments — that fix a procedure for the final settlement of disputes concerning the meaning 
or violation of such agreements; and the investigation of complaints referred to it by the 
minister that a party has failed to bargain collectively and to make every reasonable effort 
to conclude a collective agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations Board 
are available upon request to the Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported here under two headings: (1) Certification and other Proceedings before the 
Canada Labour Relations Board and (2) Conciliation and other Proceedings before the 
Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the Department of Labour are stationed at Vancouver, 
Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, Newfoundland. 
The territory of four officers resident in Vancouver comprises British Columbia, Alberta 
and the Yukon and Northwest Territories; two officers stationed in Winnipeg cover the 
province of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario; four officers resident 
in Toronto confine their activities to Ontario; five officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and St. 
John's represent the Department in the Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations Branch and the Director of Industrial Relations 
and staff are situated in Ottawa. 

128 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



10. Brotherhood of Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and 
Station Employees, on behalf of a unit of 
employees of Maple Leaf Mills Limited, 
Montreal, Que. (Investigating Officer: Miss 
M.-P. Bigras). 

11. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 
on behalf of a unit of road conductors em- 
ployed by Northern Alberta Railways Com- 
pany, Edmonton, Alta. (Investigating 
Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

12. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 
on behalf of a unit of sleeping- and parlour- 
car conductors employed by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Montreal, Que. 
(Investigating Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

13. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 
on behalf of a unit of road conductors em- 
ployed by the Ontario Northland Railway, 
North Bay, Ont. (Investigating Officer: A. 
B. Whitfield). 

14. National Association of Broadcast 
Employees and Technicians, on behalf of 
a unit of employees of Colonial Broadcast- 
ing Company, St. John's, Nfld., employed 
at Radio Station VOCM (Investigating 
Officer: D. T. Cochrane). 

15. National Syndicate of Employees of 
Maple Leaf Mills Limited, on behalf of a 
unit of employees of Maple Leaf Mills 
Limited, Montreal, Que. (Investigating 
Officer: Miss M.-P. Bigras). 



16. Canadian Air Line Dispatchers' 
Association, on behalf of a unit of flight 
dispatchers employed in Canada by Empresa 
Consolidada Cubana de Aviacion (ECCA) 
Cubana Airlines (Investigating Officer: 
Miss M.-P. Bigras). 

17. National Syndicate of Employees of 
Quebec Air Transport, on behalf of a unit 
of hostesses and flight agents employed by 
Quebecair Inc., Rimouski, Que. (Investigat- 
ing Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

Applications for Certification Withdrawn 

1. Miscellaneous workers, Wholesale and 
Retail Delivery Drivers and Helpers, Local 
351, of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, applicant, and O'Con- 
nor Transport Limited, North Burnaby, 
B.C., respondent (L.G., Jan., p. 40). 

2. Communications Workers of America, 
applicant, British Columbia Telephone 
Company, Vancouver, B.C., (traffic divi- 
sion), respondent, and Federation of Tele- 
phone Workers of British Columbia, inter- 
vener. (L.G., Jan., p. 40). 

3. General Truck Drivers and Helpers' 
Union, Local 31 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, 
applicant, and Tourist Services Ltd., White- 
horse, Y.T., respondent (see "Applications 
for Certification Received," above). 



Reasons for Judgment in application 
for certification affecting 

International Longshoremen's Association Applicant 

and 

12 Companies as Represented by The Shipping 

Federation of Canada, Inc. Respondents 



This is an application for certification of 
the Applicant as bargaining agent for a 
unit of employees of the Respondents* 
engaged in the handling of ocean freight 
in and out of the port of Montreal and 
classified as checkers, coopers, timekeepers, 
manifest clerks and office clerks excluding 
supervisory and confidential employees — 
engaged on the docks in the port of 
Montreal. 

* Empire Stevedoring Co. Ltd., Watts Watts Ship- 
ping Ltd., Kerr Steamship Limited, Brown & Ryan 
Limited, Wolfe Stevedores Limited, McLean Ken-- 
nedy Limited, The Cunard Steamship Company 
Limited, The Robert Reford Co. Ltd., Eastern 
Canada Stevedoring Co. Ltd., Canadian Pacific 
Steamships Limited, Furness Withy & Company 
Limited, Montreal, Australia, New Zealand Line 
Limited. 



The initial application covered the em- 
ployees in these classifications of 35 com- 
panies, members of The Shipping Federa- 
tion of Canada, engaged in shipping in 
and out of the port of Montreal. On July 
9, 1963, the Applicant asked leave to sub- 
mit, and submitted an amended application 
for certification, excluding therefrom such 
of the said companies named in the orig- 
inal application as did not have employees 
engaged on a regular basis in the classi- 
fications comprising the proposed bargain- 
ing unit. The effect of the amendment 
would be to reduce the number of com- 
panies to 12. These are the ones designated 
as the Respondents. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



129 



The Respondents oppose this amendment 
of the application but, subject to the 
Board's decision with respect thereto, gave 
consent to being joined in the application 
pursuant to and subject to the provisions of 
Section 9(3) of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act. 

In view of the circumstances and in the 
exercise of the discretion accorded to it 
under the aforesaid Act, the Board has 
granted leave to the Applicant to amend 
its application for certification as requested. 

The basic issue between the parties con- 
cerns the appropriateness of the bargaining 
unit in respect of which certification is 
applied for. 

The Applicant is and has been for a 
number of years the bargaining agent of 
employees of the Respondents and other 
member companies of The Shipping Federa- 
tion of Canada, employed as checkers and 
coopers (cargo repairmen) at the port of 
Montreal under the terms of an existing 
collective agreement between them, as 
well as under preceding collective agree- 
ments. 

The effect of the present application, if 
granted, would be to extend the scope of 
this existing bargaining unit in so far as it 
relates to the employees of the Respondents, 
by adding thereto timekeepers, manifest 
clerks and office clerks employed by them 
on the docks in the port of Montreal. The 
Applicant claims an over-all majority mem- 
bership of employees in this proposed 
enlarged unit, but has not a majority mem- 
bership of employees comprising the addi- 
tional group whom it thus seeks to add to 
the existing unit. 

According to the evidence given to the 
Board, checkers and coopers are hired by 
the Respondents on a day-to-day basis 
through the Applicant and are paid on an 
hourly basis. They are employed only dur- 
ing the open port season. On occasions, 
the services of checkers may be used as 
clerks on the docks to help clean up an 
accumulation of work on the docks. In such 
instances, under the existing collective agree- 
ment, they are to be paid an additional 
hourly rate while so employed. 

After the port of Montreal is closed 
down in the winter, some checkers originally 
from Saint John may be sent down to the 
port of Saint John, N.B., to do similar work 
during the winter months when this port's 
activities increase, and they may in such 
event in some instances be employed as 



clerks on the docks if the latter are in 
short supply. 

The office personnel, including the clerks 
and timekeepers on the docks, are paid on 
a monthly-salary basis, are hired directly 
by the company, and are generally employed 
on a year-round basis. In the winter period, 
when the port of Montreal is closed, these 
employees are engaged in clerical work in 
the main offices of their company in Mont- 
real or are transferred by their employer 
for similar employment in the Maritime 
ports to help look after the substantial in- 
creased shipping activities during that period. 
These office workers are accorded the same 
pension rights, medical benefits and vaca- 
tion-with-pay rights as other clerical em- 
ployees of their employer in the main 
office. 

The Respondents contend that the work 
of the clerical staff on the wharves is 
simply an extension of the work done by 
the clerical staff in the main offices and 
that their functions are essentially the same, 
and that the timekeepers who keep the time 
of the longshoremen on the docks are a 
part of the company payroll department. 
The Respondents submit that their com- 
munity of interests is with the office em- 
ployees in the main office rather than with 
the checkers and coopers who it is claimed 
are in fact casual employees. 

The applicant contends that though there 
is a clear line of demarcation between the 
work of the office clerks on the wharves and 
the checkers, the unit is appropriate in 
view of the homogeneity of their work and 
the common situs of their work. 

The Board has reached the conclusion 
upon the facts as adduced in the evidence 
concerning the manner in which the work 
is carried on and in the disparate conditions 
of employment, that the unit applied for 
is not appropriate in this instance. 

In the course of the hearing, some refer- 
ence was made to a certification granted by 
the Board in 1950 to Local 1764, Steam- 
ship Checkers & Cargo Repairmen & 
Weighers & Samplers, ILA, as bargaining 
agent for employees of a number of ship- 
ping companies represented by The Ship- 
ping Federation of Canada, as employed 
in the port of Saint John, N.B., and 
described as steamship checkers, cargo 
repairmen, weighers and samplers, to- 
gether with manifest clerks and office em- 
ployees on the docks. 



The Board consisted of A. H. Brown, Vice-Chairman and Acting Chairman, and A. 
H. Balch, E. R. Complin, J. A. D'Aoust, A. J. Hills, Donald MacDonald and A. C. Ross, 
members. The judgment of the Board was delivered by the Vice-Chairman and Acting 
Chairman. 



130 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



A check of the record of that 1950 case 
indicates that the only classifications of em- 
ployees shown on the companies' payroll 
records at that time were checkers and 
coopers. Such clerical employees as were 
employed on the docks were apparently in- 
cluded within the checker category and 
were employed and paid upon the same 
basis and at the same rates as checkers. The 
collective agreements entered into sub- 
sequently between the parties to the 
certification have apparently covered only 
checkers and cooper classifications of em- 
ployees. In these circumstances, that deci- 
sion has little relevance to the facts of the 
present application. 



The application is rejected accordingly. 
(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
V ice-Chairman and Acting Chairman 

P. Cutler 

L. G. Taylor 

G. Tremblay 

B. Fisher 

For the Applicant 

P. F. Renault 

C. T. Mearns 
J. A. Crichton 
Capt. P. N. Bolger 
P. V. O. Evans 

For the Respondents. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 19, 1963. 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During December, the Minister of 
Labour appointed conciliation officers to 
deal with the following disputes: 

1 Asbestos-Eastern Transport Inc., 
Asbestos, Que., and Locals 106 and 938 
of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (Conciliation Officer: 
C. E. Poirier). 

2. Canadian Arsenals Limited (Small 
Arms Division), Long Branch, Ont., and 
United Steel workers of America (Con- 
ciliation Officer: T. B. McRae). 

3. Baton Broadcasting Limited, Agin- 
court, Ont., and National Association of 
Broadcast Employees and Technicians (Con- 
ciliation Officer: T. B. McRae). 

4. Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited, 
Vancouver, and Canadian Air Line Pilots' 
Association (Conciliation Officer: G.R. 
Currie). 

5. Soo-Security Motorways Ltd., Winni- 
peg, and Local 979 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 
(Conciliation Officer: J. S. Gunn). 

6. Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Com- 
pany Limited and National Association of 
Broadcast Employees and Technicians (Con- 
ciliation Officer: T. B. McRae). 

7. National Harbours Board and Civil 
Service Association of Canada (Quebec 
Harbour Police) (Conciliation Officer: C. 
E. Poirier). 



Settlements by Conciliation Officers 

1. Canadian Arsenals Limited (Small 
Arms Division), Long Branch, Ont., and 
United Steelworkers of America (Concilia- 
tion Officer: T. B. McRae) (see above). 

2. Pacific Western Airlines, Vancouver, 
(I.F.R. and V.F.R. Divisions), and Cana- 
dian Air Line Pilots' Association (Con- 
ciliation Officer: G. R. Currie) (L. G., 
Jan., p. 41). 

3. The Toronto Harbour Commissioners 
and Local 1842 of the International Long- 
shoremen's Association, Toronto (Concilia- 
tion Officer: T. B. McRae) (L.G., April 
1963, p. 309). 

Conciliation Boards Appointed 

1. Radio Station CHRC Limitee, Quebec, 
and National Association of Broadcast Em- 
ployees and Technicians (L.G., Nov. 1963, 
p. 1016). 

2. Central Truck Lines Ltd., Val d'Or, 
Que., and Locals 938 and 106 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America (L.G., Jan., p. 40). (Note: Local 
106 has been added to the dispute at the 
request of the parties.) 

Conciliation Boards Fully Constituted 

1. The Board of Conciliation and In- 
vestigation established in November to deal 
with a dispute between Robin Hood Flour 
Mills Limited (laboratory department em- 
ployees), Humberstone, Ont., and United 
Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers 
(L.G., Jan., p. 41), was fully constituted in 
December with the appointment of W. H. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



131 



Dickie of Toronto as Chairman. Mr. 
Dickie was appointed by the Minister on 
the joint recommendation of the other two 
members of the Board, Norman L. Mathews 
of Toronto and F. Stewart Cooke of Hamil- 
ton, who were previously appointed on the 
nomination of the company and union, 
respectively. 

2. The Board of Conciliation and Investi- 
gation established in November to deal with 
a dispute between Robin Hood Flour Mills 
Limited (plant employees), Humberstone, 
Ont., and United Packinghouse, Food and 
Allied Workers (L.G., Jan., p. 41), was 
fully constituted in December with the 
appointment of W. H. Dickie of Toronto as 
Chairman. Mr. Dickie was appointed by the 
Minister on the joint recommendation of 
the other two members of the Board, Nor- 
man L. Mathews of Toronto and F. 
Stewart Cooke of Hamilton, who were 
previously appointed on the nomination of 
the company and union, respectively. 



3. The Board of Conciliation and In- 
vestigation established in October to deal 
with a dispute between National Harbours 
Board, Montreal Harbour, and National 
Harbours Board Police Brotherhood (L.G., 
Dec. 1963, p. 1115), was fully constituted 
in December with the appointment of Frank 
Godine, Q.C., of Montreal, as Chairman. 
Mr. Godine was appointed by the Minister 
in the absence of a joint recommendation 
from the other two members of the Board, 
Francis Eugene Carlin and Louis-Claude 
Trudel, both of Montreal, who were pre- 
viously appointed on the nomination of 
the company and union, respectively. 

Board Reports of Settlement Received 

1. Denison Mines Limited, Elliot Lake, 
Ont., and District No. 6, United Steel- 
workers of America (L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 
1115). 

2. Trans-Canada Air Lines, Montreal, 
and Lodges 714 and 1751 of the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists (L.G., 
Nov. 1963, p. 1016). 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Denison Mines Limited 

and 

United Steelworkers of America 



Pursuant to the provisions of the In- 
dustrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act, a Board of Conciliation and In- 
vestigation was established With His Wor- 
ship, Magistrate J. A. Hanrahan, Chairman, 
G. B. S. Ferguson, Q.C., nominee of the 
Company, and Peter Podger, nominee of 
the Union. 

The Board met with the parties in 
Toronto, Ont., on December 6, 1963. 
There appeared for the Company: 
H. E. Houck, Consultant 
M. J. DeBastiani, Manager 
C. B. Banks, Superintendent. 
There appeared for the Union: 
O. Mancini, Area Supervisor 
G. Gilchrist, Representative 
A. Brunet, Representative 
J. Norton, Representative 
And members of a bargaining committee. 



Comprehensive briefs were presented by 
the parties. From these, the Board learned 
the previous agreement had expired June 
23, 1963. There are some 870 now em- 
ployed in this mine. Despite lengthy meet- 
ings between the parties, assisted finally on 
two occasions by a conciliation officer, 19 
items remained in dispute. 

An exhaustive review of the difficulties 
facing the uranium industry in Canada was 
given by Mr. Houck. He stated only the 
Canadian Government's contract to stock- 
pile, which is due to expire July 1964, keeps 
this mine in operation. There is hope for 
the future but no immediate prospects for 
an additional market. 

Against that gloomy background, the 
Board commenced its efforts. Despite de- 
tailed information contained in the briefs 
concerning the non-monetary items remain- 
ing in dispute, the Board determined to 
direct its attention first to what appeared 



During December, the Minister of Labour received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to deal with a dispute between Denison Mines 
Limited, Elliot Lake, and District No. 6, United Steelworkers of America. 

The Board was under the Chairmanship of Magistrate J. A. Hanrahan of Windsor, 
Ont. He was appointed by the Minister on the joint recommendation of the other two 
members, George Ferguson, Q.C., of Toronto, and Peter Podger of Streetsville, Ont., 
nominees of the company and union, respectively. The report is reproduced ibwrc 



132 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



to be four basic matters that would have 
to be favorably resolved if any progress 
were to be made at this level. These were: 
the term of the renewal, continuation of 
the separation provision that exired with the 
previous agreement, wages, and union 
security. 

Although early in the negotiations it 
appeared the Company would renew the 
separation-allowance provision in its 
original terms, providing a complete agree- 
ment could be reached, this was not what 
the Union sought. It not only wanted the 
$400 maximum changed to no limit to 
what the $6.00 monthly contribution could 
produce, but also that its terms should apply 
to those on layoff at the time of closure. 

The terms of the agreement varied as 
possible patterns were considered. While 
two years seemed a potential possibility, at 
one stage the Union changed its demands 
to cover a one-year agreement, based on 
a 5-cent-an-hour improvement as of this 
date, plus improvements in certain cate- 
gories. 

The question of union security proved 
troublesome to the end. Finally, the Union 
would have been content to agree to a 
voluntary irrevocable [checkoff], subject to 
an escape clause [applicable within] 30 days 
from the expiry date, but this was firmly 
rejected. 

The major part of the day-long effort 
was spent trying to develop some suitable 
plan for renewal of the severance-allowance 
provision. The solution finally created was 
owing in no small measure to the valued 
contributions made by the Chairman's fel- 
low-members, which he wishes to gratefully 
acknowledge. 

The package design that finally evolved 
included the dropping of a number of items, 
and was only realized by pressure applied 
on both sides, upwards and downwards. 
This was the result — a memorandum of 
agreement — signed by the parties, as 
follows: 

The parties hereto agree to renew their 
previous agreement for a period expiring 
August 31, 1965, with only the following 
changes: 

1. To contain all matters previously resolved 
before the date of this hearing. 

2. Wages: Effective September 1, 1964, an 
increase of five cents an hour; effective the 
same date, an additional two cents an hour foi 
hoistmen with compressor's papers. 

3. Upon execution of the proposed renewal, 
the Company undertakes to deliver to the Union 
a letter as to severance pay as per provision 
outlined in the document in the custody of 
the Chairman. 



The signatories hereto agree to accept 
and recommend to their principals the fore- 
going as a settlement of all matters in dispute. 

Dated at Windsor, Ontario, this 10th day 
of December, 1963. 

(Sgd.) J. A. Hanrahan, 

Chairman. 

Form of Letter referred to in Memorandum 

Whereas at the time of these negotiations 
it appeared there was a possibility that the 
Company's operations at Elliot Lake might 
be shut down during the term of the col- 
lective agreement; 

And whereas it is mutually agreed in such 
event the following provisions for sever- 
ance pay should apply: 

1. The continuity pay for employees in 
the hourly bargaining unit of Denison Mines 
Limited at the Elliot Lake property will 
be a maximum of $450.00 per employee 
up to September 1, 1964 and $500.00 per 
employee after September 1, 1964 and to 
the expiry date of the collective agreement, 
to be accumulated at the rate of $6.00 per 
month of continuous employment since 
the last date of hiring; [and] 

2. Continuity pay will be paid to those 
employees who have in excess of six months 
continuous service with the Company. A 
month's service for the purpose of con- 
tinuity pay will be any money wherein the 
employee worked at least 75 per cent of 
his scheduled shifts for that month, unless 
he was prevented from doing so because 
he was on Workmen's Compensation as 
result of an occupational accident incurred 
working for Denison Mines Limited. 

3. The Company agrees that it will pay 
the applicable severance allowance out- 
lined above to all employees whose em- 
ployment is permanently severed at the 
time of shutdown or prior to shutdown. 
However, no severance pay shall be granted 
unless the severance is directly due to a 
complete shutdown. 

4. To obtain severance pay the employee 
must remain in the employ of the Com- 
pany until his services are permanently 
severed for the above reasons. 

5. The obligation of the Company to pay 
severance pay will cease at the termination 
of the collective agreement, August 30, 
1965. 

6. Any dispute arising from implementa- 
tion of these provisions may be referred 
to an arbitration panel to be established by 
the parties. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 

73933-4—4 



133 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Trans-Canada Air Lines 

and 

International Association of Machinists 



The Board of Conciliation consisting of 
Mrs. Frances Bairstow, Union nominee; H. 
M. Sparks, Company nominee, and W. H. 
Dickie, Chairman, met with the parties at 
Montreal on October 10 and 11, November 
1 and 2, and again on November 25, 26, 
and 27, 1963. 

Appearing for the Company were: 

F. C. Eyre, Director Industrial Relations 

G. E. Bolton, Director Personnel and In- 

dustrial Relations 

A. D. Bertoir, Manager Labour Relations 
D. H. Gray, Director Maintenance and 

Overhaul 

G. R. McKillop, Supervisor of Labour 
Relations 

R. Peterson, Assistant General Super- 
intendent of Overhaul Base 

S. Sheldrake, Supervisor Administration 
Services 

C. Hodgson, Supervisor of Training and 
Labour Relations 

B. Horan, Labour Relations Assistant 

A. Sadler, Vice-President Administration. 

Appearing for the Union were: 

Mike Pitchford, Chairman Negotiating 

Committee 
Frank Heisler, Airline Co-ordinator IAM 
Don Wasserman, Research Dept. IAM 
M. Rygus, General Vice-President IAM 
Ed Smith, General Chairman Lodge 714 

IAM 
J. King, Committee Member Lodge 714 

IAM 
Ron Ulmer, Committee Member Lodge 714 

IAM 
L. Foreman, Committee Member Lodge 714 

IAM 
Ross Secord, Committee Member Lodge 

714 IAM 
Frank Grennan, President Lodge 1751 

IAM 
Wilf Bulger, Committee Member 1751 

IAM 
Jean Bowles, Committee Member 1751 

IAM 
John Farrell, Committee Member 1751 

IAM 
R. N. Gray, Grand Lodge Representative. 

The parties to the dispute are Trans- 
Canada Air Lines, and the International 
Association of Machinists as represented by 
Airline Lodge 714 and Trans-Oceanic 
Lodge 1751. 



The Union represents certain classifica- 
tions of employees in the maintenance and 
overhaul, station services and stores depart- 
ments, of the Company. The total number 
of employees involved as of June 1, 1963 
is 4,398, which constitutes 37.6 per cent 
of the total employees of the Company. 

The collective agreement in question 
became effective July 1, 1962, and remained 
in effect until June 29, 1964, with the 
exception of the basic wage rates and the 
trade differentials, which were to remain 
in effect only until July 1, 1963, at which 
time the contract could be reopened for 
negotiation of these two items. 

After a series of negotiating and con- 
ciliation meetings, which extended over the 
period from June 25, 1963 to August 13, 
1963, the parties came to this Board with 
the same two issues unresolved. 

The Company and Union both presented 
excellent briefs with exhibits that were 
supported by oral argument. The Board 
met with the parties collectively and 
separately, and examined in detail all of 
the aspects of this dispute. 

It should be noted that this is the first 
time in their 14-year collective bargaining 
history that these two parties have been 
to a Conciliation Board. This speaks well of 
their relationship. 

After our hearings on November 2, an 
executive meeting was held by the Board 
members on November 9, after which it was 
decided that we should try again to resolve 
the dispute. Accordingly, hearings were 
scheduled for November 25. As a result of 
long and arduous efforts made by all con- 
cerned, a memorandum of settlement was 
reached and has since been ratified by the 
Union membership. We are pleased to 
report the details as follows: 

Memorandum of Settlement 

The parties hereto agree to recommend to 
their principals the acceptance of the fol- 
lowing terms as a settlement of all the 
items in dispute. 

{Continued on page 161) 



During December, the Minister of Labour received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to deal with a dispute between Trans-Canada Air 
Lines, Montreal, and Lodges 714 and 1751 of the International Association of Machinists. 

The Board was under the Chairmanship of W. H. Dickie of Toronto. He was 
appointed by the Minister on the joint recommendation of the other two members, Mrs. 
Frances Bairstow of Beaconsfield, Que., and H. M. Sparks of Montreal, nominees of the 
union and company, respectively. The report is reproduced here. 



134 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



Quebec Court of Queen's Bench rules on validity of decree 
under province's Collective Agreement Act. B.C. Supreme 
Court enjoins picketing of trucks delivering to customers; 
in another decision rules that arbitration board should hear 
evidence regarding custom of honouring lawful picket lines 



In Quebec, the Court of Queen's Bench, 
upholding a Superior Court judgment, 
ruled that a decree under the Quebec Col- 
lective Agreement Act establishing a five- 
day week and prescribing Sundays and 
Wednesdays of each week as non-working 
days for the distribution of bread in a speci- 
fied area was constitutionally valid as being 
concerned with subject matters within pro- 
vincial legislative competence, and did not 
trespass on federal jurisdiction respecting 
Sunday observance. 

In British Columbia, the Supreme Court 
ruled that, under Section 3(2) of the Trade- 
unions Act, picketing of trucks making 
deliveries to customers is prohibited be- 
cause the phrase "the employer's place of 
business, operations, or employment" in 
Section 3(1) of the Act does not include 
any place such as a street, lane or a park- 
ing area where an employer's driver stops 
his delivery truck to make a delivery to a 
customer. 

In another decision, the British Columbia 
Supreme Court ruled that in arbitration 
proceedings under a collective agreement, 
the Board of Adjustment, before deciding 
whether the employer had reasonable cause 
in dismissing employees who refused to 
cross a picket line, should accept evidence 
regarding an alleged usage or custom where- 
by the employees may, without violating 
the terms of their collective agreement, 
properly refuse to cross a picket line set 
up in consequence of a lawful strike. 

Quebec Court of Queen's Bench . . . 

• . . rules that decree establishing hours 
of work is within provincial jurisdiction 

On June 4, 1963, the Quebec Court of 
Queen's Bench, Appeal Side, dismissed an 
appeal from a judgment of the Quebec 
Superior Court and held that a decree 
under the Collective Agreement Act, ap- 
proved as required by order in council, 
that established a five-day week and 
prescribed Sundays and Wednesdays of 



each week as non-working days for the 
distribution of bread in a specified area 
did not trespass on federal power respect- 
ing Sunday observance. 

The Court held that the object of the 
decree is not the observance of Sunday as 
a religious day but concerns the establish- 
ment of hours of labour and a five-day 
work week, which are subject matters within 
provincial legislative competence. 

A company operating a bakery in Mont- 
real was summoned in March 1961 to 
appear before a Judge in the Court of 
Sessions of the Peace, District of Montreal, 
to answer a complaint laid by the Parity 
Committee that on Wednesday, February 
8, 1961, it had committed an offence by 
delivering bread and other similar products 
in Montreal in violation of Art. V of the 
decree issued under Section 9 of the Col- 
lective Agreement Act. 

Article V of the decree, as approved by 
Order in Council 1639 dated October 5, 
1960, amending No. 85, provides: 

V. Hours of work, working days and non- 
working days: The standard work week shall 
consist of five (5) working days and there shall 
be no delivery on Sundays and Wednesdays of 
each week, and all Sundays and Wednesdays 
are specified as non-working days. 

However, in any week where a holiday occurs 
other than on a Wednesday, the Wednesday 
shall become a working day. 

Section 9 of the Collective Agreement 
Act (as amended in 1960) in part provides: 

Without restricting the generality of the 
preceding paragraph, the decree shall render 
obligatory, with respect to hours of labour, 
among other provisions of the collective agree- 
ment those specifying working days and non- 
working days or parts thereof, as well as the 
time when a working day shall begin and end 
for each category of employees. 

The company applied to the Superior 
Court for a writ of prohibition challenging 
constitutional validity of the decree in ques- 
tion, as well as the validity of Section 9 
of the Act as amended in 1960. 

On April 4, 1962, the Superior Court 
dismissed the application for a writ of 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73933-4— 4i 



• FEBRUARY 1964 



135 



prohibition and declared constitutional, 
legal, valid and binding the decree and 
Section 9 of the Act. 

On appeal, the company did not attack 
the enabling provisions of the Collective 
Agreement Act, but contended that Part V 
of the decree was ultra vires of that statute. 
In particular, the company argued that 
the decree, in prohibiting deliveries on Sun- 
day, was trespassing in the field of criminal 
law, reserved by S. 91 of the B.N.A. Act 
to the Parliament of Canada. In this 
respect, the company relied on the decision 
of the Supreme Court of Canada in Henry 
Birks & Sons (Montreal) Ltd. v. Montreal 
and A. G. Que. (L.G. 1956, p. 417), which 
set aside a Quebec statute purporting to 
authorize municipal councils of cities and 
towns to pass by-laws for the closing of 
stores on certain religious holidays, and the 
by-law of the City of Montreal passed 
under that statute. 

Mr. Justice Hyde, in his reasons for judg- 
ment, distinguished the Birks case from the 
decree in question. He held that, in the 
Birks case, the Court found that the legisla- 
tion was concerned with the observance of 
certain days as Holy Days and not simply 
as holidays, whereas, in the situation at bar, 
as was held by the trial judge, the disputed 
enactment deals essentially with the labour 
agreement, does not provide a penalty for 
a crime, provides for a matter within pro- 
vincial competence, and is therefore intra 
vires of the Legislature of Quebec. 

Further, Mr. Justice Hyde added that the 
true character and object of the decree is 
not Sunday observance but hours of labour 
and the organization of a five-day working 
week, which is a subject within the legisla- 
tive competence of the province as deter- 
mined by the Supreme Court of Canada in 
the reference Re Treaty of Versailles, The 
Hours of Labour (L.G. 1925, p. 671); nor 
is the decree objectionable in specifying in 
Art. VI nine named days as "holidays" for 
its purposes merely because two of the 
days have religious significance. 

The Court ruled that the Judge of the 
Court of Sessions of the Peace did not 
exceed his jurisdiction in dealing with the 
complaint brought against the company, 
and that the Judge did not err in declaring 
valid the two orders in council sanctioning 
a decree issued in accordance with the Col- 
lective Agreement Act, and" prescribing 
non-working days for the distribution of 
bread in a specified area. Regina v. Court of 
Sessions of the Peace, Ex parte Richstone 
Bakeries Inc., (1963) 40 D.L.R. (2d) Part 
2, p. 246. 



British Columbia Supreme Court . . . 

. . . rules that the picketing of trucks 
making deliveries to customers is illegal 

On July 23, 1963, Mr. Justice Aikins of 
the Supreme Court of British Columbia, 
dismissing an application to vary the terms 
of an injunction to restrain picketing, ruled 
that the phrase "the employer's place of 
business, operations, or employment" in 
Section 3 of the B.C. Trade-unions Act 
does not include any place where an em- 
ployer's driver stops his delivery truck to 
make a delivery to a customer. Therefore, 
such a place may not be lawfully picketed 
under this section. 

The plaintiffs were wholesale and retail 
dealers in meat, with business premises 
situated at 1811 Cook Street, Victoria, B.C. 
As part of their business, they used trucks 
to make both wholesale and retail deliveries 
to customers. 

On June 28, 1963, Mr. Justice Wootton 
granted an ex parte injunction restraining 
Local 212 of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters 
and Butcher Workmen of North America 
from unlawfully picketing the plaintiff's 
place of business. 

On July 4, the same judge, on a motion 
to continue the injunction, granted an in- 
junction restraining the union until the 
trial or until further order from, inter alia, 
unlawfully watching or besetting or picket- 
ing the premises of any of the customers or 
suppliers of the plaintiffs, persuading any- 
one not to deal or handle the products of 
the plaintiffs or do business with the plain- 
tiffs, and interfering with the contractual 
relations of the plaintiffs with any other per- 
son or corporation, except at the plaintiffs' 
place of business, situated at 1811 Cook 
Street in Victoria. 

Further, the union was restrained from 
molesting or threatening the employees or 
customers of the plaintiffs, interfering with 
such employees or customers entering or 
leaving the plaintiffs' premises, and from 
interfering with the employees, agents or 
servants of the plaintiffs while they were 
engaged in delivering the merchandise of 
the plaintiffs or while otherwise engaged in 
the course of their employment. 

The union applied for variations of the 
injunction order and, in particular, asked 
to have added as a separate paragraph of 
the order, the following: 

Provided nothing herein shall prevent the 
defendants or any of them from lawfully watch- 
ing or besetting or picketing the plaintiffs' 
place of business situate at 1811 Cook Street, 
Victoria, British Columbia, and the plaintiffs' 
trucks used in the business or operation or 
service of the plaintiffs. 



136 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



The union's motion was dealt with by 
Mr. Justice Aikins of the British Columbia 
Supreme Court, who noted that the order 
made by Mr. Justice Wootton preserved the 
union's right to lawfully picket at the 
plaintiffs' place of business at 1811 Cook 
Street, Victoria. Consequently, the real 
substance of the union's application was to 
have the order varied so as to permit them 
to lawfully picket the plaintiffs' trucks used 
in the plaintiffs' business. 

The union did not ask for permission 
to have mobile pickets in a vehicle which 
would move in close proximity of one of 
the plaintiffs' trucks as it proceeded from 
place to place on the plaintiffs' business, 
displaying signs or placards as the vehicle 
was in movement, but asked that the union 
should be allowed to picket wherever one 
of the plaintiffs" trucks stopped to make 
delivery and then only for so long as the 
truck stopped at the point of delivery and 
the driver or other workman was making 
a delivery of merchandise to a customer. 

Apparently what the union proposed to 
do was follow a delivery truck belonging 
to the plaintiffs and, as soon as it stopped 
to make a delivery at a customers' place of 
business, either display a placard from the 
following vehicle, which would also come 
to a stop, or discharge picketers from the 
following vehicle with placards to picket the 
delivery vehicle so long as it remained 
stationary at the place of delivery and while 
the delivery was taking place. 

Section 3 of the B.C. Trade-unions Act, 
relevant to the issue at bar, reads: 

3(1) Where there is a strike that is not 
illegal under the Labour Relations Act or a 
lockout, a trade union, members of which are 
on strike or locked out, and anyone authorized 
by the trade-union may, at the employer's place 
of business, operations, or employment, and 
without acts that are other wise unlawful, per- 
suade or endeavour to persuade anyone not to 

(a) enter the employer's place of business, 
operations, or employment; or 

(b) deal in or handle the products of the 
employer; or 

(c) do business with the employer. 

(2) Except as provided in subsection (1), 
no trade union or other person shall persuade 
or endeavour to persuade anyone not to 

(a) enter an employer's place of business, 
operations, or employment; or 

(b) deal in or handle the products of any 
person; or 

(c) do business with any person. 

Under the provisions of Section 3(1) of 
the Act, where there is a legal strike (as 
was the case in the situation under review ) , 
a trade union may, at the employer's place 
of business, operations, or employment, 
without acts that are otherwise unlawful, 
persuade or endeavour to persuade anyone 



not to do business with the employer or 
deal in or handle his produce. In Mr. Justice 
Aikins' opinion, the act of persuasion or 
endeavouring to persuade must be at the 
employer's place of business, place of 
operations or place of employment. The 
words "operations" and "employment" used 
must be read as if the words "place of" 
immediately preceded each word. 

Further, Mr. Justice Aikens held that, 
unless the place where a delivery truck 
stops on a street, lane or in a parking area 
to make a delivery becomes, for the time 
that the truck is stopped and the delivery is 
being made, a place of business or a place of 
operations or a place of employment of the 
employer who owns the truck, then, for 
the union at that place to persuade or at- 
tempt to persuade any person not to do 
business with the employer or deal in or 
handle his produce is unlawful under sub- 
section (2) of Section 3 of the Trade-unions 
Act. 

Consequently, the question to be decided 
by the Court was whether the place where a 
delivery truck stops to deliver an em- 
ployer's merchandise to a customer is to be 
regarded as either the employer's place 
of business, or the employer's place of 
operations, or the employer's place of em- 
ployment. If such a place falls within 
either one or other of the three categories, 
then the union may lawfully picket at such 
place for the purpose of persuading or 
endeavouring to persuade persons not to 
deal in or handle the produce of the em- 
ployer, provided that the picketing is done 
without acts that are otherwise unlawful. 

Counsel for the union argued that the 
Trade-unions Act of 1959, having the effect 
of limiting previously enjoyed rights of 
picketing, should not be construed restrict- 
tively, but rather be given the broadest rea- 
sonable interpretation so as to preserve 
rather than eliminate a right to picket, 
which it was asserted was enjoyed without 
question prior to the passage of the present 
Act. 

The union found support for giving the 
particular words a broad or liberal inter- 
pretation in the following principle ex- 
pressed by Mr. Justice Rand in Aristocratic 
Restaurants (1947) Ltd. v. Williams and 
Morrison (L.G. 1951, p. 1553): 

The fact that two of the restaurants were not 
within the unit of employees for which the 
union was authorized to act does not affect 
the question; the owners' economic strength is 
derived from his total business; and it is against 
that that the influence of information is being 
exerted. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



137 



The union argued that the Act should be 
interpreted so as to permit picketing at any 
place where the employers did anything to 
further their business so that the union 
could bring pressure to bear on the total 
economic strength of the employers. 

Mr. Justice Aikens held that the union's 
argument might be of assistance if the 
relevant words of the statute did not have 
an easily ascertained plain or ordinary 
meaning. The words used in the statue "the 
employer's place of business, operations, or 
employment" do not seem to be ambiguous, 
nor does it seem that giving them their 
ordinary meaning in relation to the issue at 
bar would result in any absurdity or mani- 
fest injustice that might be presumed to be 
outside the intent of the legislative as- 
sembly. 

In Maxwell On Interpretations of Statutes, 
11th ed., at p. 6, a reference was made to 
what is called the "cardinal rule" or the 
"golden rule" of interpretation. In this 
respect, Mr. Justice Aikens referred to the 
following words of Chief Justice Jervis in 
Mattison v. Hart (1854), 14 CB 357, 
23 LJCP 108, which seemed to him to be 
particularly relevant to the situation at bar: 

We ought to apply to this case what has 
been called the golden rule of construction, 
namely, to give to an Act of parliament the 
plain, fair, literal meaning of its words, where 
we do not see from its scope that such mean- 
ing would be inconsistent, or would lead to 
manifest injustice. 

Mr. Justice Aikens held that adopting the 
ordinary sense of the words "employer's 
place of business" or "employer's place of 
employment" does not mean any place at 
which an employer's delivery truck hap- 
pened to stop momentarily to make delivery 
of merchandise to a customer. In his 
opinion, such a place cannot be held to be 
one of the employer's places of business or 
one of the employer's places of employ- 
ment. 

The union argued, however, that the 
plaintiffs' business is, in part, the delivery 
of meat to customers and that, therefore, 
the delivery of meat is an operation of the 
employer's business; that whenever a 
delivery takes place there is a business 
operation and that, therefore, the place 
where the delivery is consummated is one 
of the employer's places of operation for 
the length of time that the delivery is taking 
place. 

Mr. Justice Aikens could not accept the 
contention that the particular place where 
a delivery truck stops on a street, lane, or 
parking area can be said to be one of the 
plaintiffs' places of operations. He added 
that the Act does not say "anywhere that 



138 



the employer operates, or does anything 
forming part of the operation of his busi- 
ness." The words are "the employer's place 
of . . . operations." The word "place" im- 
plies something rather less transitory and 
fortuitous than the place on street, lane or 
parking area selected by a driver to stop his 
vehicle and make a delivery. The word 
"operations" is in the plural and implies 
more than a single delivery of goods. 

Mr. Justice Aikens concluded that, 
adopting the ordinary meaning of the words 
used, the phrase "the employer's place of 
. . . operations" does not mean any place 
that an employer's driver stops a delivery 
truck to make a delivery to a customer. 

The application to vary the terms of the 
injunctions was dismissed. Williams et al v. 
Local 212, Amalgamated Meat Cutters and 
Butcher Workmen of North America et al, 
(1963), 44 WWR, Part 8, p. 458. 

British Columbia Supreme Court . . . 

. . . rules arbitration board should hear 
evidence on honouring of picket lines 

On June 19, 1963, the British Columbia 
Supreme Court ruled that, in arbitration 
proceedings under a collective agreement 
concerning dismissals of employees allegedly 
without reasonable cause, the Board of 
Adjustment should accept evidence regard- 
ing an alleged usage or custom that union 
members may properly refuse to cross a 
picket line set up in consequence of a law- 
ful strike. The Court held that such evidence 
was relevant to the application of the col- 
lective agreement even when the agree- 
ment was silent on the question of picket- 
ing and also silent on the question of 
whether the employees have the right to 
refuse to cross lawful picket lines. 

Further, the Court ruled that it was 
equally open to the employer to show that 
no such custom or usage existed, or, if 
such did in fact exist, it was not applicable 
in the particular circumstances of the case. 

Then, it would be for the Adjustment 
Board to determine, in the light of all 
the evidence adduced on both sides, whether 
the employer had reasonable cause in dis- 
missing employees who failed to carry out 
their duties under the collective agreement 
because of their refusal to cross a picket 
line, or whether the employees had, with- 
out violating the terms of their collective 
agreement, the right to honour picket lines 
where a lawful strike was in progress. Re 
Canadian Air Line Pilots Association and 
Pacific Western Airlines Ltd., Ex parte 
Bray et al, (1963) 40 D.L.R. (2d), Part 1, 
p. 125. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 









Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

Ontario issues comprehensive foundry safety rules. Manitoba 
establishes five classes of gas fitters' licences. Quebec 
extends Workmen's Compensation Act coverage. Newfoundland 
replaces its regulations for boilers and pressure vessels 



In Ontario, comprehensive safety regula- 
tions for foundries set out detailed require- 
ments with respect to working spaces and 
working conditions, sanitation, ventilation, 
heating and personal protective equipment. 

New regulations under the Manitoba Gas 
and Oil Burner Act provide for five classes 
of gas fitters' licences. 

In Newfoundland, revised regulations for 
boilers and pressure vessels provide for 12 
types of operators' certificates. 

In Quebec, the coverage of the Work- 
men's Compensation Act has been extended, 
bringing under the Act many small estab- 
lishments previously excluded because of 
the small size of the regular work force. 

Manitoba Gas and Oil Burner Act 

Manitoba has issued new regulations 
governing the installation and alteration 
of gas-burning devices which, among other 
matters, make major changes with respect 
to the licensing of gas fitters and, for the 
first time, impose on gas suppliers import- 
ant obligations designed to ensure the safe 
operation of such equipment. Issued under 
the Gas and Oil Burner Act as Man. Reg. 
100/63, gazetted November 23, they came 
into force on January 1, repealing Part II 
of Man. Reg. 9/57 (L.G. 1957, p. 469). 

Classes of Gas Fitters' Licences. The 
new regulations replace the previous gas 
fitter's licence with the following five classes 
of licences: commercial and industrial gas 
fitter's licence; domestic gas fitter's licence; 
liquid petroleum gas fitter's licence; utility 
gas fitter's licence; and special gas fitter's 
licence. 

There are important differences in the 
scope of the work that each of these licences 
authorizes into holder to perform. A person 
with a commercial and industrial gas fitter's 
licence may install any gas equipment. The 
holder of a domestic gas fitter's licence 
may install any gas equipment where the 
input of a single installation does not exceed 
400,000 British Thermal Units per hour, 
as may a person holding a utility gas fitter's 
licence in the course of employment with 
a gas utility; the latter also is specifically 
authorized to inspect, service or repair any 
gas equipment. 

The holder of a liquid petroleum gas 
fitter's licence is restricted to installing gas 
equipment using liquid petroleum gas where 



the input to any single installation does not 
exceed 125,000 British Thermal Units per 
hour. A person holding a special gas fitter's 
licence may install, service and repair gas 
equipment manufactured by the firm speci- 
fied on his licence. 

Qualifications for Licences. There are 
three ways in which a person may qualify 
for a commercial and industrial gas fitter's 
licence. He may be issued such a licence if 
he has held continuously a gas fitter's 
licence, issued under the Act, during the 
two-year period immediately prior to Janu- 
ary 1, 1964, and if, in addition, he satisfies 
the Board of Examiners that, within that 
period, he has had at least one year of 
experience in installing and servicing com- 
mercial and industrial gas-fired equipment 
with an input exceeding 400,000 British 
Thermal Units per hour, or equivalent ex- 
perience. 

Alternatively, an applicant must have at 
least four years of practical experience 
under the direct supervision of a person 
holding a commercial and industrial gas 
fitter's licence. Also acceptable is a 
plumber's or steamfitter's certificate and, in 
addition, two years of practical experience 
under the direct supervision of a person 
holding a commercial and industrial gas 
fitter's licence. 

There are two ways in which a person 
may qualify for a domestic gas fitter's 
licence. He may do so if he has at least 
two years of practical experience as a 
steamfitter, or in related work acceptable 
to the Board, and has one year of practical 
experience under the direct supervision of 
a person holding a gas fitter's licence, and, 
in addition, has completed a study course 
acceptable to the Board. Alternatively, he 
must have held, for at least two years, a 
licence to install and service oil-burning 
equipment, and have had experience, accept- 
able to the Board, in connection with gas- 
burning equipment. 

In order to qualify for a liquid petroleum 
gas fitter's licence, an applicant must have 
had at least one year of practical experience 
in a related trade acceptable to the Board. 
In addition, he must have completed a 
course relating to liquefied petroleum instal- 
lation. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



139 



A utility gas fitter's licence may be issued 
to a person who has specialized knowledge, 
acceptable to the Board, of the installation, 
servicing and repair of a particular type of 
gas equipment. 

A provision for recognizing licences of 
other jurisdictions authorizes the Minister 
of Labour, on the recommendation of the 
Board, to issue a licence to a person who 
holds one of a similar type issued by 
another licensing authority. 

Issue and Control of Licences. A licence 
is valid for the period shown on it and 
must show the date of expiry. If a licensee 
does not renew his licence for three or more 
years, he may be required to pass a new 
examination before a new licence is issued 
to him. 

There are several controls on licences, 
which are intended to ensure that gas fit- 
ters comply with the legislation and obey 
the orders of inspectors. If a gas fitter fails 
to do so, the chief inspector may suspend 
his licence for 30 days or recommend its 
cancellation by the Minister. 

The licensee may appeal to the Minister 
the suspension of a licence or a recom- 
mendation for its cancellation. The Min- 
ister, at his absolute discretion, may confirm 
the suspension or cancel the licence, or vary 
the suspension or recommendation. 

The chief inspector may recommend to 
the Minister the reinstatement of a licence, 
and the Minister is empowered to do so, 
when the cause of the suspension no longer 
exists. 

The Minister may reinstate a licence that 
has been suspended for an unstated period 
or cancelled. A licence suspended for a 
definite period is automatically reinstated 
when the period of suspension expires. 

Permits. No person may install, alter or 
make an addition to gas equipment unless he 
first submits to the chief inspector a writ- 
ten application for a permit, giving the 
location of the premises and of the gas 
equipment, and specified information con- 
cerning the equipment. Drawings and 
specifications, as required by the chief 
inspector, must also be submitted if the 
total input of gas equipment exceeds 
400,000 British Thermal Units per hour. 

The chief inspector may not issue a per- 
mit until he is satisfied that all matters in 
the application, and in drawings and 
specifications, are in accordance with the 
legislation. 

CSA Standard B 149- 1962, Installation 
Code for Gas Burning Appliances and 
Equipment, is adopted as a minimum 
standard for the installation, alteration, or 



addition to gas equipment. The chief in- 
spector, however, may require higher safety 
standards, if necessary. 

Gas Suppliers' Responsibilities. Gas 

utilities are prohibited from supplying gas 
or connecting gas equipment until the gas 
fitter produces a permit for the installa- 
tion and a utility gas fitter has made a 
complete inspection of it. 

Similarly, no person may connect a 
liquid petroleum gas container to a new gas 
installation unless an application for a per- 
mit has been made. If the gas equipment is 
not approved, or if the hourly input of the 
gas equipment exceeds 60,000 British 
Thermal Units, the application must be 
approved by the chief inspector and a per- 
mit issued before the installation may be 
connected. In addition, a licensed gas 
fitter must first make a complete inspection 
of the installation and verify that it com- 
plies with the regulations and the code. 

In the case of both the gas utility and the 
person supplying liquid petroleum gas, a 
written report must be made to the chief 
inspector within seven days from the time 
gas is made available, showing: location of 
the premises, licence number of the gas 
fitter who made the installation, and serial 
number of the permit. The report must also 
state whether the gas fitter's tag was 
attached to the gas equipment, whether all 
appliances carried the seal of approval, and 
if the installation complied with the regula- 
tions and the code. 

In addition, the gas utility's report must 
show whether the installation was checked 
for leaks with a dial test on the meter, and 
the report of the liquid petroleum gas sup- 
plier must state the name of the person who 
inspected the installation. 

Gas Fitter's Responsibilities. In order to 
identify the person making a gas installa- 
tion and place upon him responsibility for 
the standard of his work, each gas fitter 
has a tag bearing a number assigned to him 
by the Department of Labour. When he 
completes an installation, he must affix one 
of these tags to it. 

He must also post in a visible location 
his name, address, telephone number, and 
the manufacturer's instructions for the 
operation of the gas equipment that he has 
installed. 

When the oil storage tank is removed on 
conversion of oil-fired equipment to gas 
firing, the gas fitter must remove the fill and 
vent pipes. Certain responsibilities are also 
imposed upon him with respect to safety 
valves on hot water or steam boilers that 
have been fired by another fuel and con- 
verted to gas. 



140 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



Powers of Inspectors. The chief inspector 
is required to have inspections of gas 
equipment made. He may approve or reject 
equipment conditionally or unconditionally. 

An inspector has authority to enter 
premises to inspect gas equipment during 
reasonable hours. If equipment is improp- 
erly installed or altered, he may order 
the owner of the building or premises not 
to use it until the installation or alteration 
conforms with the regulations. 

The owner may appeal to the chief in- 
spector against such an order. The chief 
inspector must give written notice to the 
installer and to the owner of the equip- 
ment — who are required to comply with it 
— specifying any defects and the time 
allowed for their correction. 

Provision is made, however, for an 
appeal to the Minister from an order of 
the chief inspector. The Minister has 
absolute discretion to confirm or vary an 
order, and his decision is final. 

Other Safety Matters. The regulations 
provide that no person may weld or make a 
welded connection to any gas equipment 
unless he holds a welder's certificate issued 
under the Steam and Pressure Plants Act, 
and each weld must be stamped by his 
number. 

Running repairs to gas-burning equip- 
ment may be made by the holder of a 
Third Class Operating Engineer's certificate, 
or higher, in the plant where he is em- 
ployed, but not elsewhere. 

No person may alter approved gas equip- 
ment unless he first obtains the chief in- 
spector's approval to do so. 

N.B. Workmen's Compensation Act 

In New Brunswick, the operation of 
taverns was brought under Part I of the 
Workmen's Compensation Act, the collec- 
tive liability section, by O.C. 63-845, 
gazetted December 11. 

Newfoundland Boiler and Pressure 
Vessel Act, 1959 

New Boiler and Pressure Vessel Regula- 
tions, 1963, in Newfoundland provide for 
12 types of certificates of competency for 
operators and allow specified types of pres- 
sure plants of smaller capacity, equipped 
with automatic controls and safety devices, 
to be operated under certain conditions by 
uncertified personnel. These regulations, 
gazetted December 3, are the first to be 
issued under the Boiler and Pressure Vessel 
Act, 1959, which was proclaimed in force 
on December 2, 1963. The Boiler and Pres- 
sure Vessel Regulations, 1950, are revoked. 

The regulations, which are in four parts, 
set out requirements for plant registration 



and certification of operators, and lay down 
procedures for welding and the qualifica- 
tions of welders. 

Plant Registration. Pressure plants ex- 
ceeding specified total horsepower ratings 
are governed by the legislation and must be 
registered. They are divided into seven 
classes as follows: stationary high-pressure 
heating plants; stationary low-pressure heat- 
ing plants; stationary high-pressure heating 
and power plants; stationary refrigerating 
pressure plants; stationary compressed-gas 
pressure plants; stationary combined-pres- 
sure plants; and portable pressure plants. 

The owner of a pressure plant, when 
applying for a plant registration certificate, 
must inform the Board of Examiners of the 
name and index number, class and year of 
issue of the certificate of competency held 
by each stationary engineer and every 
other operator engaged in the operation of 
the plant. He must also inform the Board of 
any subsequent changes in staff. 

A certificate of plant registration must 
show the classification and total horsepower 
rating of the pressure plant concerned and 
the classes of personnel required to operate 
it. 

Inspection. Most provisions relating to in- 
spection are contained in the Act itself. The 
regulations, however, specify that all in- 
spectors must be conversant with the CSA, 
ASME, and ASA codes applicable to the 
design, construction, maintenance, repair 
and inspection of all classifications of 
boilers, pressure vessels and pressure plants. 
The chief inspector or an assistant inspector 
must be a stationary engineer, first class, 
grade A or AB; an inspector must be a 
stationary engineer, second class, grade A 
or AB, or higher. 

Certificates of Competency. The regula- 
tions provide for the following 12 types of 
certificates of competency, and specify the 
type of work the holder may do: stationary 
engineer, first class, grades A and AB; 
stationary engineer, second class, grades A 
and AB; stationary engineer, third class, 
grades A and AB; stationary engineer, 
fourth class, grades A and AB; fireman; 
compressor operator; and refrigeration 
operator, grades A and B. 

The scope of responsibilities of the holder 
of a compressor operator's certificate or a 
refrigeration operator's certificate has been 
increased, eliminating the requirement to 
have an operating engineer in charge of 
plants of large capacities in these categories. 

Board of Examiners. The regulations also 
contain directions for the Board of 
Examiners set up under the Act to appraise 
qualifications of candidates for certificates 
of competency and to appraise and deter- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



141 



mine the classification of pressure plants. 
The Board is required to meet at least four 
times a year on specified dates. 

Operation of Automatic Plants. Special 
provisions now relax requirements for the 
supervision of certain automatically con- 
trolled pressure plants by certified person- 
nel. Where specified types of pressure plants 
are equipped with automatic controls and 
safety devices, and production is normally 
curtailed at night, on Sundays and on holi- 
days, the Board may allow an uncertified 
person to act as shift engineer or operator. 

In such a case, however, a stationary 
engineer, fourth class, employed as chief 
engineer on a regular shift, would also 
assume responsibility for and supervision of 
the other shifts and be on call. Uncertified 
personnel would be repsonsible to him. 

The types of plant to which the foregoing 
provisions apply are as follows: a stationary 
combined-pressure plant or a stationary 
high-pressure heating plant, not exceeding 
50 horsepower; and a stationary low-pres- 
sure heating plant, a stationary refrigera- 
tion pressure plant or a stationary com- 
pressed-gas pressure plant, not exceeding 
150 horsepower. 

Adoption of Codes. The new Act author- 
izes the chief inspector, with the approval 
of the Minister of Labour, to adopt by 
reference, the ASA, CSA, or ASME codes, 
which will be enforced by inspectors. The 
chief inspector has now adopted two CSA 
codes, CSA B5 1-1.960, Code for the Con- 
struction and Inspection of Boilers and 
Pressure Vessels, sixth edition, and CSA 
B52-1951, Mechanical Refrigeration Code, 
second edition. 

Ontario Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act 

In Ontario, comprehensive new safety 
regulations for foundries, the first such 
regulations to be issued in the province, were 
gazetted as Ont. Reg. 332/63 on December 
21 to go into force 10 days after publica- 
tion. 

The new regulations, which were issued 
under the Factory, Shop and Office Build- 
ing Act, implement a recommendation of 
the Royal Commission on Industrial Safety. 
In its report the Commission stated that 
safety regulations for foundries had been 
prepared in 1955 but had never been pro- 
mulgated, due principally to "certain objec- 
tions relating to ventilation and sanitation 
raised by industry." 

Inspectors of the Department of Labour, 
however, were said to be applying certain 
provisions without any defined authority to 
do so, and the Commission urged that the 
draft regulations be set out in a practicable 
form and implemented. 



As recommended by the Commission, the 
regulations were rewritten and then reviewed 
by the Labour Safety Council, which re- 
ceived briefs from representatives of man- 
agement and labour. 

The regulations not only contain general 
safety rules for foundries, but also set 
out detailed requirements with respect to 
working spaces and working conditions, 
sanitation, ventilation, working temperatures 
and personal protective equipment. 

Coverage. The new foundry regulations 
apply in premises where base metals or 
their alloys are cast in moulds or where 
dust-causing operations ancillary to the 
casting process are carried on. They do not, 
however, apply to places where steel in- 
gots only are cast, or to metal refineries, 
nor do they cover die casting or the print- 
ing industry. 

General Safety Rules. The regulations 
make it clear that, while the major 
responsibility for compliance rests with the 
employer, employees are obliged to use 
the personal protective equipment provided 
and to observe all applicable safety rules. 

Any new foundry in which any part of 
the lowest floor level of any working space 
(this does not include offices, storage rooms, 
locker-rooms, etc.) is below the adjacent 
ground level, may not be put into operation 
without a written authorization from the 
chief inspector. Any existing foundry in 
which a similar condition prevails may not 
continue operating without the approval of 
the chief inspector. 

No new foundry or addition to any exist- 
ing foundry may be put into operation un- 
less the ceiling height above the floor of 
every working space is at least 16 feet. 

No parting material (a fine sand or other 
powdery substance used to prevent adhesion 
to the surfaces of the parts of a mould) 
may contain more than 2 per cent free silica 
unless approved in writing by the chief 
inspector. 

All buildings, equipment and machinery 
must be maintained in safe working condi- 
tion and must be regularly inspected by the 
employer or person designated by him to 
ensure the safety of persons in the 
foundry. 

It is the employer's responsibility to see 
that certain precautions are taken with a 
cupola (the furnace used for melting iron 
or other metal in large quantities). 

The bottom of every cupola must be 
supported by one or more adequate metal 
props with metal bases and wedges sup- 
ported on concrete or other solid footing. 
The employer must provide shields or solid 
screens to protect employees at the slag- 
holes, spouts and tap holes of every cupola 



142 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



or furnace. Every cupola with a closed top 
must have doors on the top of the cupola 
hinged to act as explosion vents to the 
outdoors. 

When work is performed in a cupola or 
similar place, the employer must ensure 
that an approved overhead protective 
wooden or metal cover or screen supported 
by props or overhead slings is provided to 
protect persons from falling objects. 

It is also his duty to see that every cupola 
is equipped with a blast gate or automatic 
damper in the air supply pipe to the cupola, 
or with other positive means of preventing 
the accumulation of combustible gases in 
the air supply system when the air supply 
fails. 

To prevent explosions, the employer must 
ensure that a continuous open flame or 
other positive means of ignition is main- 
tained above the charging level of the 
cupola while it is in operation and until 
all combustible material is consumed. 

It is also the employer's duty to see that 
every wheel moving on tracks at floor level 
is shielded so as to prevent injury to the 
feet of employees. Every skylight must be 
fitted with wired or shatter-proof glass or 
non-shatterable translucent material, or 
with protective wire netting attached to its 
underside. 

Where metal castings or scrap are broken 
by means of a dropping device, a permanent 
shield of wood planking two inches thick, 
or equivalent protection, adequately sup- 
ported, must be provided by the employer 
to protect persons from flying metal frag- 
ments. 

Every tumbling mill is to be equipped 
with a positive locking device to prevent 
any movement of the mill when being 
loaded or unloaded. The regulations fur- 
ther provide that the employer must en- 
sure that every moving part of the mill is 
either fully enclosed or guarded to a height 
of six feet or more above the adjacent 
walking surface. 

Some responsibility for compliance is 
also placed on employees. The regulations 
expressly state that foundry employees are 
equally responsibile with the employer for 
seeing that the six following general safety 
rules are observed: 

— The employer and the employees are 
responsible for ensuring that the legs and 
supports of every cupola are protected from 
damage by molten metal. 

— It is their duty to see that any coke, slag 
and unmelted metal resulting from the dropping 
of the cupola bottoms is removed by a me- 
chanical rake or other mechanical means as 
soon as practicable after the cupola is 
emptied. 

—Before the bottom of a cupola is dropped, 
a visual and audible signal must be given for 
at least three minutes, after which the prop or 



props must be removed by a winch or similar 
device operated from outside a wall or shield at 
the cupola or from another safe location. 

— No material containing ice or moisture may 
be charged into any furnace containing molten 
metal except a cupola. 

No completely enclosed vessel may know- 
ingly be charged into any furnace without 
first being broken open. 

— Finally, the employer and employees must 
ensure that sufficient care is taken of chains, 
slings, wire-ropes and other hoisting equipment 
to ensure the safety of persons, having regard 
to the temperatures to which such equipment is 
exposed and the uses to which it may be put. 

General floor conditions. The floor and 
any water system immediately surrounding 
any melting unit are to be constructed so as 
to prevent any accumulation of moisture 
under or near the melting unit. 

All moulding floors, gangways (defined 
passageways between a metal-melting unit 
and a metal -pouring area), passageways 
and aisles must have a firm surface without 
holes or depressions and without slopes hav- 
ing a gradient of more than one in sixteen. 

All permanent gangways are to be clear- 
ly marked and gangways not used for 
carrying molten metal are to be at least 
three feet wide. The regulations also 
prescribe the minimum width of gangways 
used for carrying molten metal, taking into 
consideration the type of container, the 
number of workers conveying the metal, 
and the direction of the traffic. 

In addition, they stipulate that, where any 
ladle is carried by an overhead crane, 
adequate warning must be given before it 
is moved, and all employees must im- 
mediately leave the area over which the 
ladle is to be transported. 

If molten metal is handled on a gallery 
or other area having any working space 
below it, the gallery or area must have a 
solid floor that will prevent molten metal 
from leaking or burning through it. A gal- 
lery must also have a solid barrier at least 
three and one-half feet high on all exposed 
sides to prevent metal spillage. 

The regulations specify the minimum 
width of pouring aisles, the width varying 
according to the type of ladle used. 

Any pit more than 24 inches deep must 
have its inside walls reinforced with brick, 
concrete, steel plate or other non-com- 
bustible material that will not cave in. 

When in use, every pit is to be securely 
protected with railings or chains secured 
to stanchions, or with a solid wall, the top 
of which must be at least three and one- 
half feet above the surrounding floor. 
Similar precautions must be taken when a 
pit is not in use or, alternatively, the pit 
may be covered with substantial material. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



143 



Housekeeping provisions. All equipment 
and material must be kept so that they will 
not interfere with free movement of per- 
sons or materials, and will not constitute a 
safety, health, fire or explosion hazard. 

Any waste material is to be removed 
from the working space of a foundry at 
least once a day. Any sand that is of no 
further use must be removed at a time and 
in a manner so as not to create a hazard 
to employees. 

Pouring aisles, cleaning-room floors or 
other areas where dust is likely to accumu- 
late, and the surface of any sand pile, must 
be kept sufficiently damp at all times to 
prevent the dissemination of dust into the 
general air of the foundry. They must not, 
however, be dampened to such an extent 
that molten metal in contact with the 
dampened sand or water is a hazard to 
persons in the vicinity. 

All gangways and pouring aisles must be 
kept clear of obstructions at all times. 

Any accumulation of dust is to be 
removed from equipment, material, and the 
interior of the foundry, in such a way as 
not to create a hazard to employees. 

Melting units and ladles. In every foundry, 
a clear space, adequate for safe operating 
and maintenance purposes, must be pro- 
vided between the outer shell of any melting 
unit and any wall, structure, equipment or 
any operation. The firing portion and fuel 
supply controls of each melting unit must 
be accessible from an aisle or be in a loca- 
tion remote from the unit. 

If a melting unit is installed after the 
regulations come into force, any passageway 
or aisle adjacent to the unit must be at 
least four feet wide. The dimensions of the 
working space at any newly installed melt- 
ing unit are also prescribed. 

Every ladle is to be dried before use and 
located in a place which is so ventilated 
that no smoke or gas will enter the working 
space. 

Guards or other protective devices are 
prescribed for various types of ladles. 

Ventilation. The provisions dealing with 
ventilation, which are very detailed, are 
designed to prevent silicosis. The regulations 
set out standards for general ventilation 
equipment and very detailed requirements 
for local exhaust systems. These last are 
intended to provide for the collection and 
disposal of process-created harmful dusts 
or substances at their source of production. 

Every foundry must be ventilated by a 
local exhaust system or by a general venti- 
lation system or both (see also "General 
Ventilation," below), but whatever the 
method used, the system must be designed, 



fabricated, installed and maintained so as 
to remove, as far as practicable, every im- 
purity in the air produced by the opera- 
tions that might endanger the health or 
safety of persons in the foundry. 

Every ventilation system must discharge 
the air to the outside so that it does not re- 
enter the building. 

It is the employer's responsibility to en- 
sure that adequate provision is made for 
the entry of air into the foundry to replace 
the air discharged from the building. He 
must see that this air is heated when neces- 
sary to maintain in each working area at 
least the minimum temperature required by 
the legislation. This air must not be taken 
from a region contaminated with silica or 
other noxious dust or substance, and must 
enter the foundry in such a manner as not 
to create a dusty condition in the atmos- 
phere of the foundry. 

This air must enter the working space 
through air inlets of sufficient number and 
area and so arranged, located and equipped, 
as to give a reasonably uniform air flow 
across the working space without subjecting 
workers to air velocities exceeding 200 feet 
per minute. The velocity of the incoming 
air, may exceed this limit if an inspector 
thinks it is adequately controlled so as not 
to affect the health or comfort of an 
employee. 

General Ventilation. As 1 has been indi- 
cated, a general ventilation system is per- 
mitted in a foundry provided it is used to 
supplement but not to replace any pre- 
scribed local exhaust ventilation. 

Subject to certain exceptions, every 
foundry in which iron, steel or aluminum is 
cast into sand moulds or moulds using sand 
cores, must be provided with general venti- 
lation equipment that will ventilate the 
foundry with a volume of at least 2,500 
cubic feet of air per minute for each ton 
of the maximum number of tons of metal 
poured in an eight-hour period, and 500 
cubic feet per minute of air for each per- 
son employed during that period in the 
working space of the foundry. 

In a foundry where brass, bronze or 
magnesium is cast, the general ventilation 
equipment must ventilate at a rate of at 
least 5,000 cubic feet of air per minute for 
each ton and 1,000 cubic feet per minute 
for each person. 

Additional requirements are set out for 
a foundry of the type described above that 
was operating when the regulations came 
into force and which has a ceiling height 
of less than 16 feet above the working 
space. 



144 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



A foundry in which any other metal but 
iron, steel, aluminum, brass, bronze or 
magnesium is cast, or where any mould or 
core other than sand is used, must be venti- 
lated at a rate satisfactory to the chief 
inspector. 

Moulding material that adheres to any 
casting may not be removed by the use of 
compressed air or by other means whereby 
dust particles may be disseminated into 
the air of the working space and are not 
controlled by local exhaust ventilation. 

Every exhaust or dust collection system, 
stack or outlet used for the discharge of 
contaminated air, is to be so located, 
designed and constructed as to prevent the 
entry or return of contaminated air into 
any building. If, however, dust or fumes 
of lead, cadmium or other toxic material, 
are exhausted from a foundry, an inspector 
may require that equipment be installed 
to remove the toxic material from the air 
that is being exhausted. 

With certain exceptions, no part of any 
dust-collecting system, local exhaust or air- 
cleaning system within any building, except 
an air-tight discharge duct from a dust 
collector to the exterior of the building, 
may be under positive pressure. 

Every collector that collects aluminum 
or magnesuim dust (except one that uses 
water) must be located outside the foundry 
or any other building unless located in a 
room that meets the following require- 
ments: 

1. It is used solely for the housing of dust- 
collecting equipment. 

2. It is separated from the rest of the 
foundry by a dust-tight partition so constructed 
that it is fire resistive for at least one hour. 

3. It is constructed to provide adequate ex- 
plosion relief to the outdoors. 

The velocity of air in the ducts of every 
dust collection system must be at least 
3,500 feet per minute, except where the air 
is leaving the dust collector. 

While any process producing any noxious 
dust, fume, gas, smoke, vapour or heat is 
in progress, the exhaust system must be 
operated continuously. 

The chief inspector has discretionary 
power to order modifications in any foundry 
ventilation system after it has been installed. 
If, upon being tested by a competent person, 
the atmosphere in any part of a foundry is 
found to contain dangerous amounts of 
dusts, gases or fumes, or to be unsatis- 
factory to the chief inspector in some other 
respect, the employer must make such 
changes as the chief inspector directs. 

Local Exhaust Ventilation. Where any 
machine or process is operated so as to 
form a localized source of dust, fume, gas, 



smoke or mist, a local exhaust must be 
provided, where practicable, so that the 
noxious material does not enter ,the general 
atmosphere of the building. 

The rate of local exhaust of every power 
shake-out must conform with the regula- 
tions. Other provisions specify how flat-deck 
or cylindrical screens and bucket elevators 
are to be enclosed and exhausted. 

Every conveyor belt must be provided 
with exhaust hoods, which must be venti- 
lated in the manner prescribed. The regula- 
tions also set out ventilation requirements 
for sand mullers and sand storage bins, and 
for various types of tumbling mills. 

Special requirements are laid down for 
places where dry, abrasive blasting is car- 
ried on, the standards to be observed 
depending on where the operation is per- 
formed. Any abrasive equipment not using 
compressed air must be enclosed with solid 
material and exhausted in the manner 
prescribed. 

Other provisions prescribe the type of 
ventilation to be provided at every core and 
annealing oven, at places where annealing 
boxes are filled or dumped, and for shell- 
moulding and shell core machines. 

Every power-driven hand tool for clean- 
ing castings must have an adequate local 
exhaust system attached and may be used 
only in a booth or on a downdraft table 
or grille. Other precautions to be observed 
depend on where such tools are used. 

Where practicable, a local exhaust system 
must be provided for any inoculation 
process or any process where magnesium is 
mixed with any other metal. 

No stationary grinding wheel, abrasive 
cutting-off wheel or buffing or polishing 
wheel may be used unless it is enclosed and 
locally exhausted in accordance with the 
regulations. The enclosure for a stationary 
grinding wheel or abrasive cutting-off wheel 
must be of sufficient strength and so located 
as to prevent injury to any person in the 
immediate vicinity of the wheel. 

Every grinding or polishing belt must be 
enclosed, except at the working area, and 
be locally exhausted in the manner pre- 
scribed so that the air movement is in the 
direction of belt travel at the working area. 

Every swing grinder is to be provided 
with mechanical ventilation by means of an 
exhaust hood or an exhaust booth approved 
by an inspector. 

Upon the direction of an inspector, an 
adequate system of local exhaust ventilation 
must be provided wherever brass or other 
metal with noxious fumes is poured, or 
when any metal is poured into shell moulds. 

Every melting unit is to be provided with 
ventilation to remove from the working 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



145 



space all dusts, fumes, etc., produced by the 
melting of the metal and the combustion of 
the fuel. 

Where brass or other metals with noxious 
fumes are melted, an enclosure, canopy 
hood, or other means for the collection of 
fumes or other substances produced in the 
melting process is to be provided as directed 
by an inspector. 

Additional precautions must be taken 
when lead, cadmium or alloys containing 
beryllium or other metals of similar or 
greater toxicity are melted. In such cases, 
the furnace must be as completely enclosed 
as is practicable and the tapping spout must 
be locally exhausted. 

Heating. An inspector is empowered to 
require in writing a minimum temperature 
of 50 degrees Fahrenheit to be maintained 
in any working space in a foundry. If, how- 
ever, the foundry is heated by means of the 
heat generated from any process, the tem- 
perature for one hour at the beginning of 
the main operating shift may be less than 50 
deg. F. Every washroom, locker room, 
change room or shower room in a foundry 
is to be kept at a temperature of at least 
70 deg. F. 

Any product of combustion from any 
heating unit for a foundry building must 
be directly vented to the outside atmosphere 
unless the chief inspector or a departmental 
engineer has approved a different arrange- 
ment. 

The regulations further provide that the 
flow of air from any unit heater or positive- 
pressure hot-air system that heats a foundry 
must be so directed as not to increase the 
concentration of dust in the breathing zone 
of any worker nor to re-circulate dust-laden 
air in the working space. 

Heat shields, heat-absorbent or heat- 
reflecting panels, cooling coils, air cooling 
or other means must be used to eliminate or 
reduce the effects of radiant heat upon 
persons. 

Approval of Plans and Changes. New air- 
handling or air replacement systems, local 
or general exhaust systems, or air-heating 
systems, must be installed in accordance 
with drawings and specifications previously 
approved by an engineer of the Department. 
The same rule applies to alterations of 
existing systems, except in the case of minor 
repairs or adjustments. 

Any type or arrangement of equipment, 
method of operation or building construc- 
tion that does not strictly comply with 
regulations, but which provides equivalent 
protection, may be used with the written 
approval of the chief inspector. 



Where, under special circumstances, strict 
compliance with the provisions is not 
adequate for the protection of employees, 
the chief inspector may order such modifica- 
tions as he considers necessary. 

Sanitation. In every foundry there must 
be a shower room with at least one shower 
bath supplied with hot and cold water for 
every 10 employees engaged on any shift. 
Adjacent to the shower room or wash room, 
the employer is to provide one or more 
locker rooms equipped with lockers or other 
suitable facilities in which employees may 
keep their clothes. Adequate drying facili- 
ties are also to be provided for drying work 
clothing. 

If, after the regulations come into force, 
a locker room, change room, washroom or 
shower room is established in a building 
separated from the foundry, the building 
must be connected to the foundry by an 
enclosed heated passageway. This passage- 
way is to be maintained at a temperature 
not less than the minimum temperature re- 
quired for the working spaces of the 
foundry. 

The walls and ceiling of any such locker 
room, change room, washroom or shower 
room must be finished in a light colour; 
the floor must have a smooth, waterproof 
surface, and the room must be maintained 
by the employer in a clean and sanitary 
condition. 

Personal Protective Equipment. It is 
mandatory for an employer to provide per- 
sonal protective clothing or equipment for 
employees engaged in specified types of 
work and to make sure that they use it. 
He must also see that an employee is in- 
formed of the requirements before allow- 
ing him to engage in work where protective 
clothing or equipment is required. 

The employer must provide every em- 
ployee whose eyes are exposed to injury 
from dust, flying chips or molten metal 
with a protective device or equipment 
designed to prevent injuries to the eyes. 

An employee who handles molten metal 
must be furnished with leggings or with 
more adequate protective clothing if re- 
quired in writing by an inspector. 

Especially designed stationary or mov- 
able guards, goggles or eye shields are to 
be provided by the employer for any em- 
ployee who is subject to direct or reflected 
arcs or radiation from electric-arc furnaces, 
welding operations or similar sources of 
harmful radiation. 

If employees are engaged in occasional 
or infrequent operations that produce 
noxious dusts, gases, vapours or fumes, and 
if an inspector is satisfied that the operations 
do not lend themselves to the installation 



146 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



of permanent mechanical ventilation equip- 
ment, the employer is obliged to provide 
them with proper respiratory equipment. 

The employer must also ensure that a 
person who normally works between a 
source of dust or fumes and the inlet of 
the local exhaust system wears at all times 
a suitable air-supplied breathing apparatus. 

Some protective clothing must be pro- 
vided by the employees themselves. Foundry 
employees who handle molten metal are 
required to wear gaiter-type boots designed 
to prevent injury from molten metal. Per- 
sons who handle heavy objects must wear 
boots or shoes with protective toe boxes or 
steel toes. 

Ontario Power Commission 

A new Ontario Electrical Code, applicable 
to all electrical equipment and electrical 
installations, has been approved by Ontario 
Regulation 304/63, issued under the Power 
Commission Act. Gazetted on November 
23, it revokes R.R.O. 1960, Regulation 490, 
as amended by O. Reg. 200/62. 

The <term "electrical equipment" in- 
cludes all equipment for the generation, 
transmission, distribution, supply or utiliza- 
tion of electric power or energy. "Electrical 
installation" includes the installation, main- 
tenance, alteration, extension and repair of 
wiring and its connection with any electrical 
equipment or other part of the wiring 
system. 

Quebec Workmen's Compensation Act 

In Quebec, all regulations excluding from 
the coverage of the Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act industries in which not more than 
a stated number of workmen are usually 
employed, were repealed by Regulation 27, 
which was approved by O.C. 2160 gazetted 
on December 14 and in force on January 1, 
1964. 

The following industries, which were 
previously excluded if fewer than four 
workmen were regularly employed in the 
establishment, are now covered regardless 
of the size of the work force: 

Repair shops, which are not garages; black- 
smiths or joiners' shops; upholstering; framing; 
the maintaining and operating of waterworks 
systems; the manufacture of rubber stamps, 
writing pads and patterns; butchering; the cut- 
ting and storage of natural ice and the trade, 
transportation or delivery of natural or 
artificial ice; the coal and wood business, tim- 
ber trade and the building materials business; 
planing mills and door and sash factories; and 
carpentry, joinery or cabinet-making work in 
a work shop. 

Further, general transportation of any kind 
(except as provided for in Chapter I, par. i), 
including scavenging, street cleaning and 
removal of snow or ice; bricklaying, masonry 
or stone setting; plastering, concrete or cement 
work in connection with buildings; excavation 



work connected with buildings; structural 
carpentry; lathing; installation of pipe organs; 
house wrecking or house moving; painting, 
decorating or renovating; glazing or installa- 
tion of plate glass; sheetmetal work; roofing; 
the erection of lightning rods; electric wiring 
of buildings or installation of lighting fixtures; 
plumbing, heating or sanitary engineering; and 
gas or steam fitting. 

Industries previously included only if six 
or more workers were regularly employed 
in an establishment are now covered regard- 
less of the number of persons employed. 
These are: 

The cutting or sawing of firewood; the manu- 
facture of cheese and butter and the opera- 
tion of a creamery or dairy; the construction 
and exploiting of telephone lines and works 
connected thereto; laundries operated by motive 
power, cleaning, dyeing and laundering estab- 
lishments; quarrying of and prospecting for 
stones and metals; the manufacture of artificial 
plumes and flowers; confectionaries; bakeries; 
the cutting, felling, piling, transportation of 
logs, wood, or wood bark and the peeling of 
logs by hand; window-cleaning; the fishing 
industry; the sale, service or repair of motor 
vehicles; public or storage garages; the sale, 
storage, distribution and handling of gasoline, 
fuel oil, propane gas, the operation of pipe 
lines and similar undertakings; and the manu- 
facturing of artificial limbs. 

All sawmills are now covered regardless 
of size, whereas previously those with fewer 
than seven employees were excluded. 

Coverage has also been extended to the 
following other industries previously ex- 
cluded if fewer than seven persons were 
usually employed: milling; the manufacture 
of cereals or cattle foods; warehousing or 
handling of grain or operation of grain eleva- 
tors, threshing machines, clover mills or 
ensilage cutters. 

The repeal of these numerical exclusions 
means that many small establishments where 
dangerous operations are performed are 
now subject to the collective liability pro- 
visions of the Act. Previously, such places 
were covered only on the application of 
the employer, and unless he applied for 
coverage, an employee was not entitled jto 
benefits. 

Saskatchewan Radiological Health Act 

In Saskatchewan, the Radiological Health 
Act, 1961, was brought into force on 
December 15, 1963, by a proclamation 
gazetted on December 13. 

This Act provides for the registration of 
radiation installations and radiation equip- 
ment; prohibits the establishment of a 
radiation installation for industrial pur- 
poses without departmental approval of 
plans; and requires persons in control of 
the possession and use of radiation equip- 
ment to be qualified in accordance with 
the legislation. 

(Continued on page 180) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



147 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE— NES 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Total of claimants for unemployment insurance benefit at end 
of November down 20 per cent from the number a year earlier 



Claimants for unemployment insurance 
benefit numbered 303,400 on November 29. 
This number was 40 per cent larger than 
the total of 218,900 on October 31 but 20 
per cent smaller than the figure of 374,200 
on November 30, 1962. 

Between 85 and 90 per cent of the in- 
crease from October to November 1963 
was made up of males, who comprised 72 
per cent of the November 29 total compared 
with 66 per cent on October 31 and 74 per 
cent on November 30, 1962. 

Persons who began to claim benefit dur- 
ing the month made up 60 per cent of the 
November 29 total and 66 per cent of them 
were males. Those who became claimants 
during the month made up 52 per cent of 
the October 31 total, of whom 57 per cent 
were males. 

Most of the claimants on November 29 
had been on claim from one to four weeks; 
21 per cent of the males and 30 per cent 
of the females had been on claim five to 
thirteen weeks; 8 per cent of the males and 
16 per cent of the female claimants, 14 to 
26 weeks. 

Initial and Renewal Claims 

Intial and renewal claims filed during 
November numbered 189,400, an increase 
of 63,200, or 50 per cent, compared with 
the October total. Compared with the 
total of 243,600 in November 1962, how- 
ever, it was a reduction of between 20 and 
25 per cent. 

Beneficiaries and Benefit Payments 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries in November was estimated to be 
161,200, compared with 148,800 in October 
and 189,000 in November 1962. 

Payments during the month totalled 
$15,500,000, which was 10 per cent more 
than the October total of $14,000,000 but 
20 per cent less than the figure of $18,900,- 
000 in November 1962. 



The average weekly payment was $23.98 
in November, $23.51 in October and $23.85 
in November 1962. 

Insurance Registrations 

On November 30, insurance books or 
contribution cards had been issued to 4,926,- 
889 employees who had contributed to the 
Unemployment Insurance Fund at one 
time or another since April 1, 1963. 

On the same date, registered employers 
numbered 336,871, a decrease of 1,214 
since October 30. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During November, 11,879 investigations 
were conducted by enforcement officers 
across Canada. Of these, 7,515 were spot 
checks of postal and counter claims to 
verify the fulfilment of statutory conditions, 
and 381 were miscellaneous investigations. 
The remaining 3,983 were investigations in 
connection with claimants suspected of 
making false statements to obtain benefits. 

Prosecutions were begun in 302 cases, 
121 against employers and 181 against 
claimants.* Punitive disqualifications as a 
result of false statements or misrepresenta- 
tions by claimants numbered 1,658.* 

Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received by the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund in November totalled 
$30,336,617.41, compared with $30,963,- 
087.46 in October and $29,588,260.44 in 
November 1962. 

Benefits paid in November totalled 
$15,467,325.53, compared with $13,989,- 
451.92 in October and $18,933,672.63 in 
November 1962. 

The balance of the Fund on November 
30 was $56,134,336.10; on October 31 it 
was $41,265,044.22, and on November 30, 
1962, it was $100,583,175.19. 

* These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



In a comparison of current unemployment insurance statistics with those for a 
previous period, consideration should be given to relevant factors other than numbers, 
such as the opening and closing of seasonal industries, increase in area population, 
influence of weather conditions, and the general employment situation. Claimants should 
not be interpreted either as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total job applicants." 

A claimant's unemployment register is placed in the "live file" at the local office as 
soon as the claim is made. As a result, the count of claimants at any given time inevitably 
includes some whose claims are in process. 



148 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



Monthly Report of Placement Operations of the NES 



Placements by National Employment 
Service local offices during December num- 
bered 104,900, of which 65,900 were place- 
ments of men and 39,000 placements of wo- 
men. This represented an increase of 7.9 
per cent from December 1962, accounted 
for by a rise of 14.6 per cent in placements 
of men and a decline of 1.7 per cent in 
placements of women. 

For the year 1963, placements totalled 
1,178,100. This marked the third con- 
secutive year in which well over a million 
persons were placed in employment by the 
NES. Of the total, male placements num- 
bered 790,400 and female placements, 387,- 
700, or 67.1 per cent and 32.9 per cent 
respectively. 

Placements involving the movement of 
workers from one area to another comprised 
2.6 per cent of December's placements, 
fractionally less than the 2.7 per cent in 
December 1962. Transfers during the whole 
of 1963 accounted for 5.3 per cent of all 
placements. This proportion was slightly 



lower than 1962 but higher than any other 
year since 1946. 

Regionally, placements during December 
and the year were as follows: 

December 1963 1963 

Atlantic 8,400 84,100 

Quebec 32,500 341,500 

Ontario 33,600 407,800 

Prairie 18,600 202,900 

Pacific 11,800 141,900 

Vacancies notified to NES offices during 
December numbered 106,900, a rise of 8.3 
per cent over the number during the same 
month last year. As with placements, the 
increase was confined to vacancies for men, 
which at 67,700 were 16.3 per cent higher 
than in December 1962. Vacancies for 
women, numbering 39,200, decreased by 3.1 
per cent. 

The cumulative total of vacancies notified 
in 1963 was 1,446,000, comprising 938,100 
(64.9 per cent) male vacancies and 507,900 
(35.1 per cent) female vacancies. 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB 2270, Nov. 8, 1963 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, single, 21 years of age, who lived in a 
village in Nova Scotia about 25 miles from 
the nearest town, filed a postal application 
for unemployment insurance benefit dated 
January 22, 1963 and was registered for 
employment as a waitress. A benefit period 
was established effective January 6, 1963. 

According to the application, she had 
worked as a waitress at a service station 
restaurant in her village from May 28, 1962, 
to January 5, 1963, when she was laid off 
temporarily. Her rate of pay was $20.00 a 
week, plus. 

In the Confirmation of Separation (Form 
UIC 479) the employer wrote: "Business 
Discontinued." 

In a letter dated March 19, 1963, the 
local office of the Commission notified the 
claimant of an offer of continuing employ- 
ment as a waitress in the nearest town at a 
starting wage of $18 a week plus meals, 
which was in accordance with the prevailing 
rate of pay in the district for that type of 
work. The hours of work were eight a day 
and 48 a week, shift work. The restaurant 
was reported to be a distance of approxi- 
mately 20 miles from her home and she 



would have had to arrange for her trans- 
portation. The local office commented that 
the claimant's Postal Application for Em- 
ployment stated that she would accept 
waitress work in that town. 

The claimant wrote to the local office on 
March 20 that the offered employment was 
"not suitable for me as it is 25 miles from 
my home and I have no way of transporta- 
tion to work there whatsoever." She ex- 
plained that she had had a job that was 
seasonable and handy to her home, and that 
she would be returning to work in May. "I 
have to be home at night to stay with my 
mother as my father has got a bad heart 
condition and she can't stay alone at night," 
she added. 

By letter dated March 25, the local office 
asked the claimant to state the employment 
opportunities in or near her village that 
would enable her to be home each night, 
and what efforts she had made to secure 
employment since January 6. In her reply, 
dated March 27, she wrote that: 

The employment opportunities which enable 
me to be home each night is that I work day 
shift at the [service station] restaurant here 
from 11.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. and it is 
approximately a two-minute walk from my 
home. 



*H* LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



149 



I have made no efforts to secure employ- 
ment as a waitress elsewhere because my job 
at the restaurant here is seasonable, . . . and 
there is no other restaurant in [the village] 
where I can secure work during the winter 
months as a waitress to enable me to be home 
each night . . . 

The insurance officer disqualified the 
claimant and suspended benefit from March 
17 to April 27, 1963 inclusive, on the 
ground that, after having become aware 
of a situation in suitable employment, she 
without good cause, refused to carry out 
written instructions for such situation when 
it was offered to her (Section 59(1) (a) of 
the Act). 

The claimant's prospective employer 
wrote on March 31 that the claimant had 
been working at his restaurant under the 
previous owner for two years and that he 
expected to hire her in May, "as her job is 
seasonal here." 

The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees in a letter dated April 2. She wrote: 

I think I shouldn't have been disqualified on 
account of my job being seasonable here and 
I will be going back to work in May, and the 
two jobs as waitress in S — and A — are not 
suitable for me, as [one] is about 20 miles and 
the [other] about 27 miles from my home and 
I have no convenient transportation to work 
to either one . . . Furthermore, the only 
transportation of convenience to the two jobs 
would be by taxi, costing between $5.00 to 
$7.00 one way. Making $18.00 per week as 
waitress, I really couldn't make any money at 
these two jobs. . . 

A board of referees heard the case in 
New Glasgow on April 30, 1963. The 
claimant was neither present nor repre- 
sented at the hearing. The unanimous 
decision of the board is as follows: 

The Board finds that the claimant lives in 
an area in a small country district where em- 
ployment opportunities are virtually non- 
existent and refused employment in the closest 
industrial centre where employment was avail- 
able because of lack of transportation facilities. 
The Board has also taken into consideration 
that the claimant is single and 21 and if 
desirous of work should have obtained living 
accommodations near the proposed job 
opportunity, and does not consider lack of 
transportation facilities from her home just 
cause for refusing to apply for a situation in 
suitable employment. 

The appeal is disallowed. . . 

The claimant applied to the chairman of 
the board of referees for leave to appeal to 
the Umpire. After retelling the story of her 
previous employment and layoff, her ex- 
pectation of being re-employed, her rejec- 
tion of the job offer and her subsequent 
disqualification, she said she had looked 
for a boarding house near the offered job 
and had spoken with "some of the girls 
that work at the said restaurant." They told 



150 



her, she said, that the nearest boarding 
house was from 3± to 4 miles away. 

This would be quite a walk for me; also, 
if I had to work (which likely I would have) a 
4 p.m. to 12 midnight shift and ... a rain, 
snow or any other kind of a storm should arise, 
would anyone say that I should be expected 
to walk that distance? 

"... checking on board prices, would cost 
me about $2.50 to $3.00 per day and for six 
days a week would be about $18.00, and only 
offer $18.00 per week; I would be wasting my 
time working for nothing, therefore I didn't 
accept the [two] waitress jobs . . . therefore 
I feel that I should be given my insurance bene- 
fits and not have been disqualified . . . 

Leave to appeal to the Umpire was 
granted by the chairman of the board of 
referees on the ground of whether or not 
the claimant could refuse to accept a situa- 
tion in suitable employment during a three- 
or four-month seasonal layoff in her 
regular employment. 

On September 9, the claimant's repre- 
sentative addressed the following letter to 
the Chief of the Adjudication Division of 
the Unemployment Insurance Commission 
at Ottawa: 

In a recent letter to [claimant], you stated 
your willingness to have statements of observa- 
tions bearing on [her]case considered. Although 
I do not know [her] personally, I am very 
familiar with the circumstances on which she 
bases her appeal. 

Her home is at L — , a village about twenty- 
five miles from the town of A — . When she 
became seasonally unemployed at L — , she 
applied at your New Glasgow office, and after 
a time was offered a job at [a drive-in] 
restaurant. This particular restaurant is not in 
the town of A — , but rather, is on the high- 
way about three and one-half or four miles 
from A — . 

The wages offered by the restaurant are such 
that any person taking employment there could 
anticipate a regular loss in the season when 
business (and therefore tips) is scarce, unless 
that person lived in his or her own home in 
A — or between A — and the restaurant. In 
other words, it seems very doubtful to me 
that any person who had to pay board, room 
rent, and transportation could "make ends 
meet" at the wages offered during the slow 
seasons. I do not wish to suggest that the wages 
are too low — the restaurant, presumably, can 
find persons so situated that they can afford 
to accept the employment. What I am sug- 
gesting [is] that the offer of employment would 
be considerable only to a person specially 
situated . . . 

Considerations and Conclusions: The 

claimant, in effect, said in her appeal to 
the Umpire that she had been informed 
that no living accommodation was to be 
found near the prospective place of em- 
ployment and that the nearest boarding 
house was in A — , a distance of "from 3i 
to 4 miles away" which, in the absence of 
any means of transportation, she would 
have had to walk, sometimes after mid- 
night, as the job called for shift work. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 






I consider that, under those circum- 
stances and in the absence of any evidence 
to show that daily transportation between 
A — and S — or nearer living accommoda- 
tion could have been found, the claimant 
has proved, as required by section 59(1) of 
the Act, that she had "good cause" for 
failing to carry out the written instructions 
which were sent to her on March 29, 1963. 

I consequently decide to allow the claim- 
ant's appeal. 

Decision CUB 2271, Nov. 8, 1963 

(Translation) 

The claimant filed an initial application 
for benefit on March 13, 1963. She had 
been employed as a day labourer by The 
Dominion — Co., W — , Que., from Octo- 
ber 22, 1962, to February 26, 1963. She 
made the following statement: 

I have been dismissed for lack of work. I 
am available for and capable of work only at 
The Dominion Co. I will not work at any 
other place. I was told it was only a temporary 
layoff. I will be called as soon as work is 
resumed. 

The insurance officer disqualified the 
claimant and suspended benefit from March 
10, 1963, on the ground that, in his opinion, 
the claimant had not established that she 
was available for work, as required by sec- 
tion 54(2) (a) of the Act, since she was 
restricting her availability to one employer 
only. 

On April 3, 1963, the claimant signed the 
following statement: 

I, — , do declare that I was not laid off 
permanently, but only for a limited period of 
time. I am not interested in working elsewhere. 

I have undergone a heart operation in the 
past and I can perform only certain type of 
work, that is why I wish to stay with my 
former employer. 

On April 26, the claimant appealed to a 
board of referees. Her appeal reads: 

I have never refused to work in W — ; ... I 
am returning to work on Monday, but there 
seems to be some misunderstanding about the 
work; I wanted to work in W — and not in 
V — nor in any other place. I am returning 
to work on April 29, 1963. 

The claimant did not appear herself nor 
was she represented when her case was 
heard by the board of referees in Drum- 



mondville on May 23. The unanimous deci- 
sion of the board reads in part as follows: 

Each case of this nature must obviously be 
decided on its merits and in the present cir- 
cumstances one must presume that no employer 
would have engaged the claimant knowing that 
she was to return to the Dominion Co. on 
April 29, 1963. Moreover, no position, not 
even a temporary one, was offered to the 
claimant. 

Under the circumstances, the board of 
referees has given the claimant the benefit of 
the doubt without a dissenting voice, and 
decided to entertain her appeal and set aside 
the decision of the insurance officer. 

On July 15 the insurance officer appealed 
to the Umpire and, on August 23, submitted 
the following reasons: 

. . . We submit that the board of referees 
has erred in deciding that the claimant had 
established her availability for work as of 
March 13, 1963. The claimant has stated in 
non-equivocal terms on March 13, March 26 
and April 3, 1963, that she was not available 
for work until she had returned to her former 
employer where no vacancies were reported 
at the time. Her late contradictory statement, 
made on April 26, 1963, does not carry much 
weight against her former statements and did 
not impress the board of referees. 

A claimant who declares that he is not avail- 
able for work during a period of temporary 
layoff certainly does not establish that he is 
available for work as required to do by the 
Act (CUBs 1956, 1969 and 2054). During a 
temporary lay-off, a claimant may prove his 
availability for work, only if he is willing to 
accept a short-term assignment pending his 
return to his regular work (CUB 2165). 

We feel the decision of the board of referees 
must be reversed and the appeal of the insur- 
ance officer maintained. 

Considerations and Conclusions: Accord- 
ing to the established jurisprudence, a claim- 
ant who is unemployed for a short period 
of time is not relieved from proving his 
availability for work in accordance with 
section 54(2) (a) of the Act. 

The statements made by the claimant are 
clearly to the effect that she was willing 
to accept work only with her regular em- 
ployer and that the latter had none to offer 
during the period in question. 

Therefore, and for the same reasons as 
those stated by the insurance officer in his 
appeal, I decided to reverse the decision 
of the board of referees. 

I consequently decided to allow the insur- 
ance officer's appeal. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



151 



WAGE SCHEDULES 

Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded in December 

Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During December the Department of Labour prepared 223 wage schedules for inclusion 
in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government and its 
Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, remodelling, 
repair or demolition, and certain services. In the same period, a total of 137 contracts in 
these categories was awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. 

In addition, 121 contracts not listed in this report and which contained the General 
Fair Wages Clause were awarded by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Defence 
Construction (1951) Limited, The St Lawrence Seaway Authority and the Departments 
of Defence Production, Mines and Technical Surveys, Public Works and Transport. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the 
contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under this heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practices; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in December for the manufacture of supplies and equipment were 
as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Defence Production 110 $576,487.00 

Post Office 6 368,466.50 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2 8,361.75 

Transport 1 7,425.00 

(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) The working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, 
or if there be no such custom, then they shall be fair and reasonable hours; 

The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour legislation of the federal Government has the 
purpose of insuring that all Government contracts for works of construction and for 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment contain provisions to secure the payment of 
wages generally accepted as fair and reasonable in each trade or classification employed 
in the district where the work is being performed. 

The practice of Government departments and those Crown corporations to which the 
legislation applies, before entering into contracts for any work of construction, remodelling, 
repair or demolition, is to obtain wage schedules from the Department of Labour showing 
the applicable wage deemed to be required in the execution of the work. These wage 
schedules are thereupon included with other relevant labour conditions as terms of such 
contracts to be observed by the contractors. 

Wage schedules are not included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
equipment because it is not possible to determine in advance the classification to be 
employed in the execution of a contract. A statement of the labour conditions which 
must be observed in every such contract is, however, included therein and is of the same 
nature and effect as those which apply in works of construction. 

Copies of the federal Government's Fair Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 
may be had upon request to the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 

152 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made in December 

During December the sum of $3,748.61 was collected from seven contractors for 
wage arrears due their employees as a result of the failure of the contractors, or their 
subcontractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required by 
the schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for 
distribution to the 104 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded in December 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Near Outlook Sask: Cathodic Protection Service Ltd, construction of cathodic pro- 
tection for tunnels, stage 1 (contract 39), South Saskatchewan River Project. 

CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION 

Montreal Que: Belgo Construction Reg'd, replacement of stair hall windows, Le 
Domaine Apartment Project; Nazalpino Construction Ltd, repairs to wooden windows, 
Villeray Terrasse. 

In addition, this Corporation awarded nine contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION 

Eskasoni Indian Agency N S: Stephens Construction Ltd, construction of school & 
recreation room addition to Eskasoni IDS, Eskasoni IR. Pointe Bleue Indian Agency Que: 
Andre Cloutier Ltd, installation of ventilating fans, Pointe Bleue IRS. Clandeboye Indian 
Agency Man: Sasaki & Associates Ltd, installation of dishwashing facilities, Assiniboine 
IRS. 

DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION (1951) LIMITED 

Summerside P E I: Universal Electric, Division of Univex Electrical, Construction 
& Engineering Ltd, installation of aerodrome lighting facilities, RCAF Station. Cornwallis 
N S: Planned Renovators Ltd, interior painting, bldgs No. 7 & No. 20, HMCS Cornwall; 
Eastern Contracting Ltd, replacing wood foundation walls with concrete in five bldgs, 
HMCS Cornwallis. Dartmouth N S: Parker Bros (1960) Ltd, plaster repairs & painting, 
Bldg No. 100, HMCS Shearwater. D chert N S: McDonald Construction Co Ltd, con- 
struction of reservoir & installation of sprinkler system in stores depot, Camp. 
Halifax N S: Parker Bros (1960) Ltd, interior painting of various bldgs, Windsor Park. 
Chatham N B: Cambrian Construction Ltd, modifications to hangar facilities & armament 
compound, RCAF Station. Bagotville Que: Frs Jobin Inc, modifications to hangar facilities 
& armament compound, RCAF Station; Atelier de Peinture Inc, fire retardant painting of 
two barrack blocks, RCAF Station; Krauspe & Krauspe, interior painting of 57 PMQs. 
Valcartier Que: Cardinal Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, interior painting of 200 PMQs, 
Camp. Val d'Or Que: Paquin Construction Co Ltd, modifications to hangar facilities & 
armament compound, RCAF Station. Gloucester Ont: Hansa Construction Ltd, construction 
of addition to administration bldg, HMCS Gloucester. Leitrim Ont: Roseboro Construction 
& Equipment Ltd, construction of antennae, Ottawa Wireless Station. Calgary Alta: Taylor 
Decorating Ltd, interior painting of four bldgs, Currie Barracks. Comox B C: Brockbank 
& Hemingway Ltd, modifications to hangar facilities & armament compound, RCAF 
Station. 

In addition, Defence Construction (1951) Limited awarded one contract containing 
the General Fair Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE PRODUCTION 

Summerside P E I: Maritime Asphalt Products Ltd, repainting interior of various 
bldgs, RCAF Station. Cornwallis N S: D J Lowe Ltd, interior painting of 30 married 
quarters, HMCS Cornwallis; D J Lowe Ltd, construction of timber shore protection wall, 
HMCS Cornwallis. Greenwood N S: Hilchie Septic Tank Service Ltd, cleaning & interior 
painting of two fuel storage tanks, RCAF Station. Halifax N S: T Hogan & Co Ltd, boiler 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 153 



repairs, central heating plant, HMCS Stadacona; James F Lahey Ltd, interior painting, 
bldg No. 61, Windsor Park. Shearwater N S: J L Nichols Contracting Ltd, installation of 
drainage system in PMQ area, RCN Air Station. Sydney N S: M R Chappell Ltd, replace- 
ment of canopies, Bldg No 17-4, 17-5 & 17-6, Point Edward Naval Base; Stephens Construc- 
tion Ltd., repairs to deck, Seaward Defence Jetty, Point Edward Naval Base. St Stephen N B: 
Edward M DeLay, renovations to basement of Armoury. Hull Que: Robert Strang, painting 
& plaster repairs, Armouries. Quebec Que: Guard-X Inc, installation of fire alarm system, 
Grande Allee Armoury. Westmount Que: Atlas Mastic Asphalt Ltd, resurfacing of vehicles 
bay & drill hall floors, 3 Hillside Ave. Clinton Ont: W MacDonald Electric Co Ltd, installa- 
tion of fire detection & alarm system in Bldgs No. 8 & No. 8, RCAF Station. Guelph Ont: 
Carere, Boles & Trimble Ltd, alterations to heating & stores accommodation, Armoury. 
London Ont: Tripod Construction Ltd, alterations to No. 27 COD, Highbury Ave. Ottawa 
Ont: Ottawa Painting & Decorating Reg'd, interior painting of Beach Bldg. Picton Ont: 
Arthur A Sills & Sons Ltd, replacement of drill hall floor. Port Arthur Ont: D R 
McCormick Electric Ltd, installation of fire detection system in Bldgs No 1 & No. 2, 
Armoury. Suffield Alta: McGregor Telephone & Power Construction Co Ltd, erection of 
power line & modification & repairs to existing power lines, Experimental Station. 
Esquimau B C: K J Howe, interior painting of 22 residences, Belmont Park. Masset B C: 
Central Electric, removal & replacement of 56 power poles, RCN Naval Radio Station. 

In addition, this Department awarded 47 contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS 

This Department awarded three contracts containing the General Fair Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN AFFAIRS AND NATIONAL RESOURCES 

Prince Edward Island National Park P E I: Williams & Murphy Ltd, construction of 
toilet bldgs & kitchen shelters, Rustico Island Campground. 

PROJECTS ASSISTED BY FEDERAL LOAN OR GRANT 

Elmira Ont: Dunker Construction Ltd, construction of sewage treatment plant. Winni- 
peg Man: Borger Bros (1963) Ltd, construction of St James interceptor, Sections A & B, 
St Charles Golf Course to Parkdale Blvd; Nelson River Construction, Section C, from 
Assiniboine River to Roblin Blvd; Nelson River Construction, construction of Charles- 
wood lagoon sewage forcemain from Perimeter Road pumping station to Charleswood 
lagoon; Nelson River Construction, construction of Charleswood lagoon effluent pipeline 
from Charleswood lagoon to Assiniboine River. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Cottrell's Cove Nfld: Gid Sacrey Ltd, wharf repairs. Exploits Nfld: Guy H Eveleigh, 
wharf repairs. Lark Harbour Nfld: Pelley Enterprises Ltd, wharf extension. Marystown 
Nfld: Spracklin & Reid Ltd, wharf reconstruction. Point Lance Nfld: Avalon Construc- 
tion & Engineering Ltd., community stage repairs. Point Leamington Nfld: Gid Sacrey 
Ltd, wharf reconstruction. Port Anson Nfld: Pelley Enterprises Ltd, wharf repairs. Port au 
Choix Nfld: Pinsent Construction Co Ltd, wharf repairs. St John's Nfld: Avalon Con- 
struction & Engineering Ltd, harbour fender system improvements, north shore; Colonial 
Construction Co Ltd, harbour improvements (pumping station). Woodstock Nfld: Gid 
Sacrey Ltd, wharf extension. Fisherman's Harbour N S: Colin R MacDonald Ltd, recon- 
struction of groynes. Halifax N S: J E Mahar & Son Co Ltd, alterations to electrical system, 
federal bldg. Maughers Beach N S: Naugle's Sand & Gravel Co Ltd, construction of pro- 
tection works for Department of Transport. Parrsboro N S: Joseph Almon, wharf repairs. 
Pictou N S: Universal Electric, installation of power outlets & lighting for warehouse, 
pier "C"; Ronald C Goodall & Alfred E MacMaster, construction of rock talus. Poirierville 
N S: Gerald J Forgeron, wharf repairs. Port Maitland N S: Clare Construction Co Ltd, 
harbour improvements (breakwater repairs). St. Peters N S: M R Chappell Ltd, con- 
struction of post office bldg. Seal Island N S: Shelburne Contracting Ltd, harbour im- 
provements. Tiverton N S: E K Potter Ltd, wharf repairs. Wedgeport N S: Kenney Con- 
struction Co Ltd, breakwater repairs. Fairhaven N B: Fundy Contractors Ltd, wharf 
extension. Little Cape N B: Scott Wheaton Ltd, wharf repairs. Port Elgin N B: Price 
Construction Co, wharf repairs. Albanel Que: Louis Dallaire & Fils Ltee, construction of 
post office bldg. Anse au Griffon Que: Julien Synnott, harbour repairs. Asbestos Que: 
Laurier Vachon Ltee, alterations to federal bldg. Cap St Ignace Que: Henri Pelletier, 

154 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



construction of post office bldg. Jacques Cartier Que: Prieur Entreprises Inc, alterations 
to post office. La Sarre Que: Gilles Mercier Enr, quay wall reconstruction. Montreal Que: 
St Lawrence Steeple Jacks Co Ltd, interior painting, Postal Station "H", 1420 Ste 
Catherine St. W. Notre Dame de Pontmain Que: Emilien Maille Inc, wharf reconstruction. 
Sucre Cceur Que: Maurice Roy, wharf repairs. St Francois du Lac Que: Wilson Jacob, 
construction of post office bldg. Ste Genevieve de Pierrefonds (Roxboro) Que: Arthur 
Bellefeuille, cleaning interior of new federal bldg. St Prime Que: Louis Dallaire et Fils 
Ltee, construction of post office bldg. St Sulpice (He Bouchard) Que: Turnbull Construc- 
tion Inc, lengthening slips & landing facilities. Sept lies Que: Landry Construction Inc, 
wharf repairs (Mgr Blanche St Wharf); Napoleon Brochu, construction of stone mound 
from Mgr Blanche St wharf toward the town wharf. Beachburg Ont: Peter E Sylvestre & 
Sons Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Callander Ont: Sted's Ltd, wharf repairs. 
Cochenour Ont: R B Rostek, construction of post office bldg. Fort William Ont: Bird 
Construction Co Ltd, construction of federal bldg. Ivy Lea Ont: Robert D Mackey Con- 
struction Co Ltd, reconstruction of wharf. Kingston Ont: James Kemp Construction Ltd, 
alterations & addition to cell block, Prison for Women; A Lanctot Construction Co, 
repairs to seawall, Royal Military College. Ottawa Ont: P E Brule Co Ltd, construction of 
apiculture processing & services bldg, CEF; A G Reed Ltd, installation of emergency 
lighting at 555, 556, 588, 615 Booth St; Dairy Technology Bldg, CEF; Justice Bldg, 
Wellington St; Hunter Bldg, O'Connor St; P O Finance Bldg, Confederation Heights. 
Port Hope Ont: B Zaitz Construction & Marine Ltd, renewal of waling, Queen's Wharf. 
South Baymouth Ont: G F Coles Construction Ltd, small boat harbour improvements. 
Toronto Ont: Price Air Conditioning Co Ltd, alterations & addition to ventilation of 
Queen's Printer accommodation, Dominion Public Bldg, 1 Front St. Woodstock Ont: 
Ellis-Don Ltd, construction of federal bldg. Pilot Mound Man: G L Holmes, construction 
of post office bldg. Reston Man: Gotthard Peterson Construction Co Ltd, construction 
of post office bldg. Winnipeg Man: Surety Construction Co Ltd, construction of cereal 
growth & service bldg, Research Station. Craik Sask: C W Hill Construction Ltd, con- 
struction of post office bldg. Hafford Sask: J G J Wolfe Construction Ltd, construction of 
post office bldg. Lashburn Sask: J G J Wolfe Construction Ltd, construction of post 
office bldg. Pelly Sask: Wm Slowski, construction of post office bldg. Spalding Sask: Wm 
Slowski, construction of post office bldg. Blairmore Alta: Glen Little, alterations to federal 
bldg for RCMP offices & living quarters. Killam Alta: D S Greenfield Construction Ltd, 
construction of post office bldg. Picture Butte Alta: Getkate Masonry Construction Ltd, 
construction of post office bldg. Sangudo Alta: D S Greenfield Construction Ltd, con- 
struction of post office bldg. Sedgewick Alta: D S Greenfield Construction Ltd, con- 
struction of post office bldg. Trochu Alta: Silisky Construction Ltd, construction of post 
office bldg. Warner Alta: Getkate Masonry Construction Ltd, construction of post office 
bldg. near Chilliwack B C: Cattermole Timber Ltd, improvements to bank protection, Big 
Eddy Area, Fraser River. Kuper Island B C: B C Pile Drivers Ltd, float construction. 
Matsqui B C: Commonwealth Construction Co Ltd, construction of bldg for Matsqui 
Institution (Contract No 2). Skaha Lake (Penticton) B C: Interior Contracting Co Ltd, 
breakwater construction. 

In addition, this Department awarded 42 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause 

THE ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY AUTHORITY 

Lachine Que: Daniels & Mannard Heating & Air Conditioning Ltd, installation of 
heating system for carpenter shop, Lachine Canal, near St Catharines, Thorald & Port 
Coiborne Ont: Beamer & Lathrop Ltd, reconditioning rotating bollards of safety fenders, 
Welland Canal. 

In addition, the St Lawrence Seaway Authority awarded one contract containing the 
General Fair Wages Clause. 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT 

Port Blandford Nfld: M & T Construction Co Ltd, construction of two single dwellings, 
entrance road & related work. Halifax N S: E J Ludford Line Construction Ltd, installa- 
tion of power distribution switch gear, International Airport. Yarmouth N S: Valley 
Services Ltd, installation of HI lighting on approach 24, MI lighting on runway 15-33 & 
LI lighting on approaches 15 & 33. Dorval Que: Inspiration Ltd, installation of cable tray 
& conduit system, air terminal bldg, Montreal International Airport. Montreal Que: 
Beaver Asphalt Co Ltd, paving of access road to landscaping maintenance bldg, Inter- 
national Airport, near Campbellford Ont: Intrusion-Prepakt Ltd, restoration of Dam No 8 

{Continued on page 161) 
THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 155 



PRICE INDEX 



Consumer Price Index, January 1964 

The consumer price index (1949=100) 
was 134.2, remaining unchanged between 
December and January. It was 1.7 per cent 
above the January 1963 index of 132.0.* 

Indexes for the food, health and personal 
care, and tobacco and alcohol components 
were unchanged between December and 
January. Indexes were higher for housing, 
transportation, and recreation and reading, 
while the clothing index was lower. 

The food index was unchanged from 
131.4 in December. Foods with price in- 
creases included powdered skim milk, 
cheese, bread, cake, doughnuts, cake mix, 
coffee and margarine, also: bananas, apples, 
orange juice, most fresh and canned vege- 
tables, chicken and a few cuts of meat. 
Lower prices were reported for evaporated 
milk, sugar, eggs, oranges, tomatoes, turkey, 
and most cuts of meat. 

The housing index increased 0.2 per cent 
from 137.0 to 137.3. Increases in the home- 
ownership index moved the shelter com- 
ponent. In the household operation com- 
ponent, price increases for floor coverings 
and household supplies and services offset 
lower appliance prices. 

The clothing index fell 1.0 per cent from 
118.9 to 117.7, as a result of January sale 
prices. The index for men's wear was un- 
changed, but indexes for women's and 
children's wear, and for footwear, showed 
decreases. 

The transportation index rose 0.4 per 
cent from 140.6 to 141.1, as a result of 
higher street car and bus fares in Toronto. 
The automobile operation component de- 
clined slightly. Lower prices for new cars 
and gasoline were partly offset by in- 
creases for motor oil. 

The health and personal care index 
remained at its December level of 165.4. 
The recreation and reading index moved 
up 0.5 per cent from 151.4 to 152.1. Price 
increases occurred for radios and phono- 
graph records in the recreation component, 
and for newspapers in the reading com- 
ponent. The tobacco and alcohol index was 
unchanged at 118.5. 

Group indexes in January 1963 were: 
food 129.0, housing 135.9, clothing 114.7, 
transportation 139.8, health and personal 
care 159.8, recreation and reading 148.6 
and tobacco and alcohol 117.8. 

*See Table F-l, page 178. 
156 



City Consumer Price Indexes, Dec. 1963 

Consumer price indexes (1949=100) for 
eight of the ten regional cities rose between 
November and December.* Indexes for St. 
John's, Nfld., and Winnipeg declined. 

Movements ranged from a decline of 0.4 
per cent in St. John's to increases of 0.4 
per cent in Halifax and Saint John. 

Food indexes rose in six cities and 
declined in four, the changes ranging from 
a drop of 0.8 per cent in Winnipeg to a 
rise of 1.3 per cent in Ottawa. Housing in- 
dexes increased in five cities, fell in two 
cities and were unchanged in three. Indexes 
for the clothing component increased in all 
but two cities, where there was no change. 
Mixed movements occurred in transportation 
indexes: five higher and five lower. Indexes 
for health and personal care were up in 
five cities, down in three and unchanged in 
two. There were five higher indexes for the 
recreation and reading component and five 
unchanged. Tobacco and alcohol indexes 
were steady in all cities. 

Regional consumer price index point 
changes between November and December 
were: Halifax +0.5 to 131.9; Saint John 
+0.5 to 133.8; Montreal +0.4 to 134.4; 
Ottawa +0.3 to 134.8; Saskatoon-Regina 
+0.3 to 129.0; Edmonton-Calgary +0.3 to 
128.0; Toronto +0.1 to 135.3; Vancouver 
+0.1 to 131.9; St. John's —0.5 to 120.3t; 
Winnipeg —0.1 to 131.1. 

Wholesale Price Index, December 1963 

Canada's general wholesale index (1935- 
39=100) declined 0.5 per cent in December 
to 245.7 from the index of 247.0 in 
November. The December index was 1.4 
per cent above the index of 242.2 in 
December 1962. 

Fve major group indexes decreased from 
November, two advanced and one remained 
unchanged. 

The vegetable products group index 
dropped 1.7 per cent to 233.6 from 237.6, 
and the animal products group index moved 
down 1.1 per cent to 247.6 from 250.3. The 
textile products group index declined 0.5 
per cent to 248.4 from 249.7; the non- 
metallic minerals products group index 
edged downward to 254.2 from 254.5. 

Advances of 0.3 per cent were recorded 
in both the wood products group index 
and the non-ferrous metals products group 
index. The wood products group rose to 
327.3 from 326.4, and the non-ferrous 
metals group moved to 200.3 from 199.7. 



* See Table F-2, page 178. 
t On base June 1951=100. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



The chemical products group index 
remained unchanged at 188.8. 

The index of Canadian farm product 
prices at terminal markets (1935-39=100) 
advanced 0.1 per cent, from 215.8 to 216.0, 
in the four-week period ended Dec. 27. The 
field products index rose 1.2 per cent from 
163.7 to 165.6, and the animal products 
index declined 0.5 per cent from 267.9 to 
266.5. 

The residential building material price 
index, on the base 1935-39=100, rose 0.3 
per cent from 314.7 to 315.6 between 
November and December, and on the 
1949=100 base, by 0.3 per cent also, from 

138.0 to 138.4. The non-residential index 
(1949=100) edged up 0.1 per cent from 

137.1 to 137.3. 



U.S. Consumer Price Index, December 1963 

The United States consumer price index 
(1957-59=100) rose by 0.2 per cent, from 
107.4 to 107.6, between mid-November 
and mid-December. The increase during 
the year 1963 totalled 1.7 per cent, although 
the average for the year (the average of the 
12 monthly indexes) rose only 1.2 per cent. 

A substantial rise in prices of fruits and 
vegetables was the main single cause of the 
increases for both December and the year. 

In December 1962 the index was 105.8. 

British Index of Retail Prices, November 

The British index of retail prices (Jan. 16, 
1962=100) rose to 104.0 at mid-November 
from 103.7 at mid-October. The rise resulted 
chiefly from seasonal increases in the 
average prices of household coal and coke. 

The index for November 1962 was 101.8. 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not for 
sale by the Department of Labour. Persons 
wishing to purchase them should com- 
municate with the publishers. Publications 
listed may be borrowed by making applica- 
tion to the Librarian, Department of Labour, 
Ottawa. Students must apply through the 
library of their institution. Applications for 
loans should give the number (numeral) of 
the publication desired and the month in 
which it was listed in the Labour Gazette. 

List No. 184 
Aged 

1. CENTRE NATIONAL DE SOCIO- 
LOGY DU DROIT SOCIAL. Cumul d'une 
pension de retraite et d'une activity lucra- 
tive; colloque des 16, 17 et 18 mars 1959. 
Preface par L. E. Troclet. Bruxelles, Edi- 
tions de l'lnstitut de sociologie Solvay, 
Universite libre de Bruxelles, 1960. Pp. 224. 

At head of title: Centre national de sociol- 
logie du droit social en collaboration avec 
l'lnstitut de sociologie Solvay de l'Universite 
libre de Bruxelles. 

Contains addresses presented at a conference 
on old-age pensions. 

2. U.S. PRESIDENT, 1961-1963 (KEN- 
NEDY). Elderly Citizens of our Nation; 
Message . . . Washington, GPO, 1963. 
Pp. 16. 

The late President spoke about what the 
American government is doing to help older 
people in 1963. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73933-4-^5 



• FEBRUARY 7964 



Conferences 

3. ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONALE 
DES SOCIOLOGUES DE LANGUE 
FRANCAISE. 3ieme COLLOQUE, GEN- 
EVE, 1960. Structures sociales et democratic 
economique. Bruxelles, Universite libre de 
Bruxelles, Institut de sociologie Solvay, 
1961. Pp. 280. 

Conference held May 2, 3 and 4, 1960. 

4. CANADIAN TAX FOUNDATION. 

Corporate Management Conference, Mont- 
real, 1963. Toronto, 1963. Pp. 49. 

Contents: Corporate Sales Tax Pitfalls, by 
Herbert O. Spindler. Permanent Establishment 
and Place of Business Tax Problems, by 
Claude Couture. Processing Income Tax 
Returns, by J. Gear McEntyre. Year-End Tax 
Considerations, by R. Alan Short. Recent Tax 
Cases on "Know-How", Foregiveness of Debts, 
Lease-Options and Lump Sum Contracts, by 
George T. Tamaki. 

5. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS RE- 
SEARCH ASSOCIATION. Proceedings of 
the Fifteenth Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, 
December 27 and 28, 1962. Edited by 
Gerald G. Somers. [Madison, 1963]. Pp. 
359. 

Some of the topics discussed were: grievance 
procedures in Western Europe, the role of 
employers' associations in industrial relations, 
university industrial relations courses, older 
workers, the role of government in collective 
bargaining, and balanced and depressed labour 
markets. 



157 



6. NATIONAL OFFICE MANAGE- 
MENT ASSOCIATION. Impact of Auto- 
mation on the Training of Present and 
Future Office Employees; Proceedings of a 
Problem-solving Seminar held at the Coli- 
seum, New York, June 8, 1962. Willow 
Grove, Pa., cl962. Pp. 68. 

Some of the topics are: training the person 
who trains others for office automation, train- 
ing for electronic data processing, electronic 
data processing in the field of education, and 
programmed instruction. 

Disabled — Rehabilitation 

7. BATON, PIERRE, lnadaptks scolaires 
et enseignement special. Preface du Pro- 
fesseur Sylvain DeCoster. Bruxelles, 
Universite libre de Bruxelles, Les Editions 
de l'lnstitut de sociologie, cl962. Pp. 261. 

Discusses the teaching of physically handi- 
capped students in Belgium. 

8. GRANT, W. RUSSELL. Principles of 
Rehabilitation. Foreword by Sir James 
Paterson Ross. Edinburgh, E. & S. Living- 
stone, 1963. Pp. 76. 

9. U.S. PRESIDENT'S COMMITTEE 
ON EMPLOYMENT OF THE HANDI- 
CAPPED. Guide to Job Placement of the 
Mentally Retarded. Washington, GPO, 
1963. Pp. 16. 

A brief outline of the type of work that can 
be done by a mentally retarded person. 

Education 

10. COLEMAN, JAMES SAMUEL. 

The Adolescent Society; the Social Life of 
the Teenager and its Impact on Education, 
by James S. Coleman, with the assistance 
of John W. C. Johnstone and Kurt Jonas- 
sohn. New York, Free Press of Glencoe, 
1961. Pp. 368. 

A study of the character of the adolescent 
society in 10 American high schools in varying 
types of communities, of varying sizes. The 
author examines the inter-relationships between 
the adolesent and his family, school, and com- 
munity. 

11. HELY, ARNOLD S. M. New Trends 
in Adult Education, from Elsinore to 
Montreal. Paris, UNESCO, 1962. Pp. 136. 

An account of changes in the adult educa- 
tion movement between the International Con- 
ference on Adult Education at Elsinore, Den- 
mark, in 1949 and the World Conference on 
Adult Education at Montreal in 1960. 

12. ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC 
CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 

Issues in Management Education. Paris, 
1963. Pp. 92. 

An examination of the present situation and 
trends in Europe of management education, 
and of the qualities and skills expected in 
managers, the education and training of 
managers, etc. 



13. U.S. INTERNATIONAL CO- 
OPERATION ADMINISTRATION. Tech- 
nical Cooperation in Education. Washing- 
ton, 1960. Pp. 31. 

14. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COM- 
MITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC 
WELFARE. The National Defense Educa- 
tion Act of 1958; a Summary and Analysis 
of the Act prepared by the Staff. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1958. Pp. 48. 

At head of title: 85th Cong., 2nd sess. Com- 
mittee Print. 

15. U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION. 

Curriculum Responsibilities of State De- 
partments of Education, by Howard H. 
Cummings [and] Helen K. Mackintosh. 
Washington, GPO, 1958, Pp. 76. 

16. U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION. 
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCA- 
TION. Distributive Education; a Guide to 
Practical Research, by Natalie Kneeland. 
Washington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 41. 

Contents: Considering Practical Research. 
Answering Questions. Following Procedures. 
Handling Statistical Data. Writing the Report. 
Using Visual Aids. Do's and Dont's. 

Education, Vocational 

17. NORTH YORK (TOWNSHIP). 
BOARD OF EDUCATION. ADVISORY 
VOCATIONAL COMMITTEE. A Study 
to determine the Need for Technical Educa- 
tion in North York Township, prepared . . . 
by L. S. Beattie [and others], Willowdale, 
Ont., 1963. Pp. 70. 

Report of a survey of business, industrial 
and commercial enterprises in North York 
Township to determine the need for training 
at all levels full-time, part-time or extension 
programs. 

18. SHAPOVALENKO, S. G. Ed. Poly- 
technical Education in the U S.SR. Paris, 
UNESCO, 1963. Pp. 433. 

A study of polytechnical education in the 
secondary-school system of Russia. 

19. WARREN, HUGH A. Technical 
Education in the U.S.A. London, City and 
Guilds of London Institute, 1963. Pp. [52]. 

The author, principal of the South-East Lon- 
don Technical College, won a scholarship 
sponsored by the City and Guilds of London 
Institute in conjunction with the English 
Speaking Union to study technical education 
in the U.S. 

20. WILLIAMS, GERTRUDE (ROSEN- 
BLUM). Apprenticeship in Europe; the 
Lesson for Britain. London, Chapman & 
Hall, 1963. Pp. 208. 

An examination of training systems in West 
Germany, the Netherlands, France, Italy, 
Switzerland, Sweden, and Belgium. 



158 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



Engineers 

21. AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR 
ENGINEERING EDUCATION. TECH- 
NICAL INSTITUTE EVALUATION 
WORKING COMMITTEE. Characteristics 
of Excellence in Engineering Technology 
Education; Final Report of the Evaluation 
of Technical Institute Education. Urbana, 
111., American Society for Engineering 
Education, 1962. Pp. 46. 

22. COMMITTEE ON OBJECTIVE 
CRITERIA IN NUCLEAR ENGINEER- 
ING EDUCATION. Report on Objective 
Criteria in Nuclear Engineering Education, 
1960-1962. Prepared by a Committee ap- 
pointed by American Nuclear Society [and] 
American Society for Engineering Educa- 
tion. [Urbana, 111., American Society for 
Engineering Education, 1963 ]. Pp. 34. 

Labour Supply 

23. ILLINOIS. DEPARTMENT OF 
LABOUR. Illinois Labor Force Projections 
for 1970. Springfield, 1963. Pp. 26. 

At head of title: State of Illinois, Depart- 
ment of Labour, Division of Unemployment 
Compensation, Illinois State Employment 
Service affiliated with United States Employ- 
ment Service. 

24. U.S. BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT 
SECURITY. Missiles, Spacecraft, and Air- 
craft; Labor Market Developments. Wash- 
ington, 1963. Pp. 19. 

25. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STA- 
TISTICS. The Forecasting of Manpower 
Requirements. Prepared for Agency for 
International Development. Washington, 
GPO, 1963. Pp. 96. 

This handbook is designed to help economists 
and statisticians in economically developing 
countries to initiate and carry out studies in 
employment forecasting. 

Labouring Classes 

26. ROTHMAN, STUART. Information 
for Employers and Unions entering into a 
Collective Bargaining Relationship for the 
First Time; an Address at the Information 
Program for Labor and Management at 
West Virginia University, April 18, 1963. 
Washington, U.S. National Labor Rela- 
tions Board, 1963. Pp. 23. 

27. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR-MAN- 
AGEMENT REPORTS. BLMR Financial 
Reporting Guide. Washington, 1963. Pp. 8. 

Explains how to fill out the financial report- 
ing form required under the Labor-Manage- 
ment Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959. 

28. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STA- 
TISTICS. Labor in Cyprus. Washington, 
1963. Pp. 44. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 

73933-4— 5h 



Mathematics 

29. U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION 

Analysis of Research in the Teaching of 
Mathematics, 1955 and 1956, by Kenneth 
E. Brown. Washington, G.P.O., 1958. 
Pp. 73. 

30. U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION. 
Curriculum Materials in High-School 
Mathematics, by Kenneth E. Brown. Wash- 
inton, GPO, 1954. Pp. 40. 

Occupations 

31. BIEGELEISEN, JACOB ISRAEL. 

Careers and Opportunities in Commercial 
Art. New rev. ed. with added material. 
New York, Dutton, 1963. Pp. 244. 

Some of the branches of commercial art 
discussed are: sign painting and gold-leaf 
lettering; showcard and reproduction lettering; 
typography; book jacket design; poster paint- 
ing; fashion design and illustration; cartooning; 
industrial design; packaging; TV scenic and 
costume design; cartoon animation; lettering 
and titling. The author also provides informa- 
tion on job opportunities, educational require- 
ments, and salaries. 

32. CARROLL, JOHN MILLAR. 

Careers and Opportunities in Electronics. 
1st ed. New York, Dutton, 1963. Pp. 191. 

Provides information about working in the 
electronics industry as an electronics engineer, 
scientist, or technician, or in a career in 
military or industrial electronics. Includes a 
chapter on careers and opportunities for wo- 
men in electronics. 

33. KING, ALICE GORE. Career Op- 
portunities for Women in Business. 1st ed. 
New York, Dutton, 1963. Pp. 212. 

The author is executive director of the 
Alumnae Advisory Center, a counseling and 
placement service for women, located in New 
York City. As well as including a chapter on 
how to look for a job, the book has chapters 
on clerical and secretarial jobs, and on non- 
professional jobs within the professions. There 
is also a description of 19 specific businesses or 
pursuits. In conclusion, there is information 
for those women who are returning to work 
after having been at home for some years, 
and for those women who wish to change jobs. 

Unemployed 

34. WICKERSHAM, EDWARD DEAN. 

Detroit's Insured Unemployed and Em- 
ployable Welfare Recipients; Their Char- 
acteristics, Labor Market Experience, and 
Experience, and Attitudes. Kalamazoo, 
Mich., W. E. Upjohn Instittue for Employ- 
ment Research, 1963. Pp. 56. 

A study of the characteristics and problems 
of insured unemployed who had been without 
work for over five weeks as of the week of 
January 9, 1961. The author supplies answers 
to four questions: "1. Who are the insured un- 
employed? 2. What are the problems of the 
insured unemployed? 3. What are the skills and 



159 



income sources of the insured unemployed? 4. 
How do the insured unemployed feel about 
their job hunt, relocation, and retraining?" 

35. WILCOCK, RICHARD CARRING- 
TON. Unwanted Workers; Permanent Lay- 
offs and Long-term Unemployment [by] 
Richard C. Wilcock and Walter H. Franke. 
New York, Free Press of Glencoe, 1963. 
Pp. 340. 

After presenting a general picture of unem- 
ployment in the U.S., the authors report the 
results of a survey of unemployed workers in 
four Armour and Company meat-packing 
plants and in a company manufacturing 
laundry equipment. The book examines the 
problem of "unwanted workers," men and 
women who are out of work a long time 
because their employers have transferred 
operations to other areas, or because tech- 
nological changes and automation have elimi- 
nated their jobs. 

Wages and Hours 

36. NEW YORK (STATE). DEPART- 
MENT OF LABOR. DIVISION OF RE- 
SEARCH AND STATISTICS. Severance 
Pay in Union-Management Agreements in 
New York State. New York, 1962. Pp. 82. 

"In this report, 'severance pay' refers to 
plans that provide money benefits to persons 
whose employment relation with the company 
is being severed, presumably permanently." 
The report is based on a study of 344 col- 
lectively-bargained severance-pay plans. Provides 
information about prevalance of plans, eligi- 
bility of the worker, benefit received and 
length of service required to be eligible, and 
other characteristics. 

37. PATCHEN, MARTIN. The Choice 
of Wage Comparisons. Englewood Cliffs, 
NJ., Prentice-Hall, 1961. Pp. 123. 

The author examines the factors that deter- 
mine to whom a person will compare him- 
self in the matter of wages. 

38. WEBER, PHILIP H. Salary Admin- 
istration for Data Processing Personnel. 
Rev. ed. Elmhurst, III., Business Press, OA 
Business Publications, Inc., 1963. 1 volume 
(looseleaf). 

This manual was prepared to be used as an 
operating guide for administering a salary 
program. Includes job descriptions, position 
grades and salary ranges, together with forms 
and procedures necessary for the salary 
administration program. 

Miscellaneous 

39. BORETSKY, MICHAEL. The Soviet 
Challenge to U.S. Machine Building; a 
Study in Production and Technological 
Policy. Washington, U.S. Dept. of Com- 
merce, 1963. Pp. 73. 

"Essentially a reprint of a study included 
in the published 1962 hearings of the Joint 
Economic Committee, U.S. Congress, on the 
'Dimensions of Soviet economic power.' " 



"A comprehensive comparison of the 
economics and technology of machinery pro- 
duction in the United States and the Soviet 
Union." 

40. CAINE, (Sir) SYDNEY. The 
History of the Foundation of the London 
School of Economics and Political Science. 
London, London School of Economics and 
Political Science, University of London [and] 
G. Bell and Sons Ltd., 1963. Pp. 103. 

The story of the London School of Eco- 
nomics and Political Science, and the part 
played by Sidney and Beatrice Webb from its 
establishment in October 1895 up to 1901. 

41. CANADIAN TAX FOUNDATION. 

Oil and Gas Production and Taxes, [by] 
R. A. Simpson [and others]. Edited by 
Jacques Barbeau. Toronto, 1963. Pp. 298. 

42. FULLER, WALTER DEANE. What 
an Office Supervisor should Know about 
Handling People. Chicago, Dartnell Corp- 
oration, 1963. Pp. 23. 

The author is former Chairman of the 
Board, the Curtis Publishing Company. 

43. HARRINGTON, MICHAEL. The 
Other America; Poverty in the United 
States. New York, Macmillan, 1963. Pp. 191. 

The author estimates that there are between 
40 and 50 million "poor people" in the U.S. 
He describes the world in which these people 
live. 

44. HEADY, EARL OREL. Agricultural 
Policy under Economic Development. Ames, 
Iowa State University Press, 1962. Pp. 682. 

Concerns agriculture and its economic 
structure, research, education, and policy 
activities under economic development. 

45. McCONNELL, CAMPBELL ROB- 
ERTSON. Economics: Principles, Prob- 
lems, and Policies. 2d ed. New York, 
McGraw-Hill, 1963. Pp. 773. 

A textbook for beginning economics 
students. 

46. SHANKS, MICHAEL, Ed. The Les- 
sons of Public Enterprise; a Fabian Society 
Study. With a foreword by Roy Jenkins. 
London, Jonathan Cape, 1963. Pp. [314]. 

An analysis of the progress to date of the 
nationalized industries in Great Britain. 

47. SUPER, DONALD EDWIN. Voca- 
tional Development; a Framework for Re- 
search [by] Donald E. Super [and others]. 
New York, Bureau of Publications, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1957. Pp. 
142. 

Contents: The Need for a Theory of Voca- 
tional Behavior. The Scientific Study of Voca- 
tional Behavior. Vocational Behavior and 
Vocational Development. Vocational Maturity 
and Vocational Adjustment. The Patterning 
of Careers. Implications for Further Research. 
The Career Pattern Study: Collecting the Basic 
Data. 



160 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



48. U.S. NATIONAL SCIENCE 
FOUNDATION. Scientific Research and 
Development in Colleges and Universities, 
Expenditures and Manpower, 1948. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 140. 

49. SOUTH AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF 
RACE RELATIONS. A Survey of Race 
Relations in South Africa, 1961. Compiled 



by Muriel Horrell. Johannesburg, 1962. Pp. 
311. 

50. US. BUREAU OF LABOR STA- 
TISTICS. Seasonal Factors, Consumer 
Price Index: Selected Series, June 1953- 
May 1961. Washington, GPO, 1963. Pp. 47. 

"This bulletin supplies basic data with which 
[U.S.] Consumer Price Index series can be 
adjusted for seasonal variation." 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

(Continued from page 116) 

Case 4 — Mr. Z, aged 58, has Grades 5 
to 8 educational standards. His disability 
was pulmonary tuberculosis and he had to 
be confined to light work only. He had once 
been a barber. After seven months of 
rehabilitation services, including medical 
and psychological services, physiotherapy, 
occupational therapy and counselling, 
refresher training and provision of barber- 
ing tools, he was able to resume barbering 
and earn $180 a month. 

The foregoing are just a few examples 
from among many, but they do indicate 
some of the possibilities for vocational 
rehabilitation among older persons. 



The federal-provincial program of voca- 
tional rehabilitation services for disabled 
persons, which has been operating for many 
years, includes medical restoration, assess- 
ment, counselling, training and employ- 
ment placement. Under the provisions of 
the Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled 
Persons Act of 1961, the program was 
given impetus and statutory authority. 

The legislation is administered federally 
by the Department of Labour through the 
office of the National Co-ordinator, Civilian 
Rehabilitation. Provincially, it is operated 
by Provincial Co-ordinators or Directors of 
Rehabilitation Services, under provincial 
departments of welfare or health. 



Report of Board 

(Continued from page 184) 

1. The collective agreement, which ex- 
pires June 29, 1964, shall be amended to 
provide: 

2. A general wage increase of 4 per cent 
effective November 5, 1963. 

3. Effective November 5, mechanics and 
above, both aircraft and non-aircraft, shall 
receive 4 cents per hour; in addition a 50 
per cent lump sum adjustment from July 2, 
1963 to November 4, 1963. (see below for 
proration). 

4. A lump sum settlement in the amount 
of $60.00 shall be paid to all employees on 
the payroll as of November 27, 1963 and 
on the payroll as of July 2, 1963. Those 
hired or in the service since July 2, 1963, 
shall be paid on a pro rata basis. 

Dated this 27th day of November, 1963, 
at Montreal, Que. 



For the Company 

F. C. Eyre 
D. H. Gray 

G. E. Bolton 
C. B. Hodgson 
S. G. Sheldrake 

For the Board 

Mrs. Frances B air- 
stow 
H. M. Sparks 
W. H. Dickie 



For the Union 

M. Pitchford 

R. G. Ulmer 

F. Grennan 

J. J. Farrell 

J. W. Bulger 

R. A. Secord 

R. A. Peterson 

E. D. Bowles 

J. E. King 

R. Nat Gray 

E. A. Smith 

M. Rygus 

All this respectfully submitted this 12th 
day of December, 1963, at Toronto, Ont. 
(Sgd.) W. H. Dickie, 

Chairman. 



Wage Schedules 

(Continued from page 155) 

at Lock 9, Trent Canal. Fort William Ont: Tallman Construction Co Ltd, paving of 
maintenance garage ramp & access road, Lakehead Airport. London Ont: M J Mol Con- 
struction Ltd, construction of drainage ditch for terminal bldg excavation, Airport. 
Malton Ont: J M Fuller Ltd, construction of foundation for precision approach radar, 
bldgs & services, Toronto International Airport. North Bay Ont: Steds Ltd, construction of 
guard rail, entrance road, Airport. Toronto Ont: Allied Building Services (1962) Ltd, 
cleaning of Air Terminal Bldg, International Airport. Edmonton Alta: Scandinavian 
Janitors Service Ltd, cleaning of Air Terminal Bldg, International Airport. 

In addition, this Department awarded 18 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



161 



LABOUR STATISTICS 

Page 

Tables A-l to A-3— Labour Force 162 

Table B-l— Labour Income 164 

Tables C-l to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 165 

Tables D-l to D- 5— Employment Service Statistics 170 

Tables E-l to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 175 

Tables F-l and F-2— Prices 178 

Tables G-l to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 180 

A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-l— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED JANUARY 18, 1964 

(estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



Canada 



Atlantic 
Region 



Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairie 
Region 



British 
Columbia 



The Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

14-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-44 years 

45-64 years 

65 years and over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agriculture 

Non-agriculture 

Paid Workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons not in the Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

* Less than 10,000. 



6,697 



4,811 
1,886 



867 
3,020 
2,004 



6,231 

4,416 
1,815 

573 
5,658 

5,141 

3,499 
1,642 



395 
71 



5,912 



1,449 
4,463 



573 

432 
141 

55 
91 

234 
174 
19 

501 

365 
136 



469 

416 

292 
124 

72 

67 

702 
203 



1,899 

1,380 
519 

193 

298 

868 

494 

46 

1,726 

1,228 



111 
1,615 



1,464 



1,005 
459 



173 



152 
21 



1,732 



410 
1,322 



2,465 

1,727 
738 

195 

275 

1,132 

776 

87 

2,345 

1,631 
714 

142 
2,203 

2,016 

1,365 
651 

120 

96 
24 

1,927 

437 
1,490 



1,143 

827 
316 

110 
138 
503 
353 



784 
305 



275 
814 



745 



484 
261 



999 



254 

745 



617 

445 
172 

45 

65 

283 

207 

17 

570 

408 
162 

13 
557 

500 

353 
147 

47 

37 
10 

552 

145 
407 



162 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



TABLE A-2— AGE, SEX AND MARITAL STATUS, WEEK ENDED JANUARY 18, 

1964, CANADA 

(estimates in thousands) 

Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 





Total 


14-19 
years 

all 
persons 




20-64 


years 




65 years 

and over 

all 


— 


Men 


Women 




Married 


Other 


Married 


Other 


persons 


Population 14 years of age and over W 


12,609 

6,697 

6,231 

466 

5,912 

53.1 
53.8 

7.0 
5.1 


1,964 

598 

519 

79 

1,366 

30.4 
33.0 

13.2 
10.1 


3,632 

3,481 

3,265 

216 

151 

95.8 
96.0 

6.2 
4.4 


992 

831 
720 
111 

161 

83.8 
84.5 

13.4 

9.7 


3,750 

932 

908 

24 

2,818 

24.9 
25.3 

2.6 
1.8 


920 

647 

623 

24 

273 

70.3 
71.0 

3.7 

2.7 


1,351 
208 




196 




12 




1,143 


Participation rate (2) 
1964, January 18 . 


15.4 


1963, December 14 


15.5 


Unemployment rate < 3 > 

1964, January 18 


5.8 


1963, December 14 


5.3 







M Excludes inmates of institutions, members of the armed services, Indians living on reserves and residents of the 
Yukon and Northwest Territories. 



W The labour force as a percentage of the population 14 years of age and over. 
(3 > The unemployed as a percentage of the labour force. 



TABLE A-3— UNEMPLOYED, WEEK ENDED JANUARY 18, 1964 

(estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



January 
1964 



December 
1963 



January 
1963 



Total unemployed 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work. . . 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1-3 months 

Seeking 4-6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months. . 



346 



541 



38 


20 


38 


428 


326 


503 


410 


305 


481 


18 


21 


22 


126 


121 


127 


202 


132 


251 


54 


35 


71 


46 


38 


54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



163 



B — Labour Income 

TABLE B-l— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME, BY INDUSTRY 

Note: Monthly and quarterly figures may not add to annual totals because of rounding. 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals**) 


Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation < 2 > 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 


Totals 

(3) 


1958— Total.... 
1959— Total.... 
1960— Total.... 
1961— Total.... 
1962— Total.... 

1962— 
November. . . 


527 
552 
560 
554 

570 

47.6 
46.6 

47.5 

47.8 
47.0 
46.7 
48.1 
49.2 
49.9 
49.8 
50.1 
49.7 
49.3 


4,823 
5,096 
5,246 
5,404 
5.808 

495.2 
481.5 

484.4 
488.7 
493.9 
503.2 
514.9 
523,0 
509.4 
523.4 
532.6 
532.2 
533.7 


1,685 
1,785 
1,810 
1.861 
1,910 

162.0 
157.1 

157.7 
157.6 
156.3 
160.7 
165.7 
170.0 
171.9 
179.9 
172.4 
172.6 
172.0 


270 

288 
326 
285 
306 

86.1 


1,317 
1,279 
1,214 
1,224 
1,326 

336.0 


307 
332 
348 
362 
384 

99.5 


2,360 
2,528 
2,640 
2,740 
2,884 

750.6 


4,303 
4,652 
5,099 
5,596 
6,079 

1,556.8 


727 

743 
795 
824 
867 

221.4 


16,521 
17,459 
18,251 
19,068 
20,359 

1,743.0 
1,692.5 


1963— 

January 

February 














1,699.4 


68.0 


272.8 


97.2 


731.9 


1,603.0 


222.1 


1,699.8 
1,714.1 
















1,764.8 


May 


68.6 


345.0 


102.5 


763.7 


1,668.8 


228.1 


1,807.9 




1,863.0 


July 














1,830.6 


August 


93.3 


412.1 


106.0 


781.3 


1,667.5 


232.4 


1,877.3 
1,907.5 
















1,897.9 
















1,883.6 



















Seasonally Adjusted 



1958— Total.. 
1959— Total.. 
1960— Total.. 
1961— Total.. 
1962— Total. . 

1962— 
November.. 
December. . 

1963— 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September*. 

Octoberf 

Novembert. 



527 


4,823 


552 


5,096 


560 


5,246 


554 


5,404 


570 


5,808 


47.4 


494.3 


46.8 


494.3 


48.1 


499.5 


48.7 


500.6 


47.6 


503.3* 


48.6 


508.7 


48.0 


510.7 


48.2 


508.8 


48.8 


507.4 


48.8 


514.8 


49.4 


517.5 


49.4 


524.5 


49.1 


532.6 



1,685 
1,785 
1,810 
1,861 
1,910 

160.6 
160.4 


270 

288 
326 
285 
306 

74.0 


1,317 
1,279 
1,214 
1,224 
1,326 

334.8 


307 
332 
348 
362 
384 

99.4 


2,360 
2,528 
2,640 
2,740 
2,884 

733.6 


4,303 
4,652 
5,099 
5,596 
6,079 

1,558.6 


727 
743 
795 
824 
867 

220.4 


164.4 














164.6 
164.8 


77.4 


348.4 


99.8 


751.7 


1.615.7 


225.4 


165.9 














164.7 
164.7 


78.7 


346.7 


102.7 


763.6 


1,638.2 


227.9 


164.0 














171.9 
166.8 


86.1 


339.1 


103.2 


779.1 


1,683.6 


230.4 


168.9 














170.3 





























16,521 
17,459 
18,251 
19,068 
20,359 



1,728.7 
1,730.1 



1,771.4 
1,768.8 
1,777.9' 
1,789.8 
1,794.6 
1,799.8 
1,800.1 
1,832.9 
1,835.2 
1,853.0 
1,867.4 



^Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 
(^Includes post office wages and salaries. 

^Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining columns 
of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. 
•Revised. 
tPreliminary. 



164 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees; 
at November 1963 employers in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total 
employment of 3,074,849. Tabels C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat 
smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage earners for 
whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate 
to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-l— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Year and Month 



Industrial Composite* 1 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



Average 
Weekly- 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



Average 
Weekly- 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



Manufacturing 



Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 



Employ- 
ment 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 



Averages 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1962— 

November. 
December.. 

1963— 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June , 

July 

August 

September. 
October*. . . 
Novembert 



117.9 
119.7 
118.7 
118.1 
121.5 



124.3 
120.2 



117.8 
117.4 
117.7 
119.3 
123.6 
127.5 
127.7 
130.2 
130.3 
129.4 
128.7 



163.9 
171.0 
176.5 
181.8 
187.5 



182. 



190.6 
192.9 
193.1 
194.4 
194.8 
194.7 
193.8 
193.9 
196.0 
197.0 
197.0 



70.43 
73.47 
75.83 
78.11 
80.55 



81.53 
78.45 



81.80 
82.87 
82,96 
83.53 
83.69 
83.64 
83.27 
83.28 
84.22 
84.65 
84.63 



109.8 
111.1 
109.5 
108.9 
113.3 



114.7 
110.9 



111.6 
112.2 
112.8 
113.7 
116.3 
118.9 
116.9 
120.0 
120.3 
119.3 
118.5 



165.3 
172.5 
117.8 
183.9 
189.2 



192.3 
183.6 



193.5 
194.2 
195.5 
197.2 
197.4 
196.2 
194.0 
194.4 
197.2 
198.8 
200.8 



72.67 
75.84 
78.19 
80.73 
83.17 



84.55 
80.71 



85.09 
85.41 
85.95 
86.72 
86.80 
86.29 
85.30 
85.47 
86.71 
87.43 
88.29 



(^Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operatipn, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and recrea- 
tional service). 

♦Revised. 

tPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73933-4—6 



FEBRUARY 7964 



165 



TABLE C-2-AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, DBS 



Area 


Employment Index Numbers 


Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 


Nov. 
1963 


Oct. 

1963 


Nov. 
1962 


Nov. 
1963 


Oct. 
1963 


Nov. 
1962 


Provinces 


145.2 
146.4 
98.2 
108.8 
129.3 
130.9 
115.7 
133.6 
162.0 
122.2 

128.7 

151.6 

81.4 
125.5 
116.1 
109.2 
116.9 
129.2 
117.0 
101.2 
121.9 

90.6 
133.6 
140.7 
128.2 
104.4 
219.5 
147.2 
121.9 
118.4 

98.0 

92.9 
133.7 
127.1 
148.0 
124.3 

87.3 
145.9 
137.1 

83.1 
153.9 
143.9 
116.9 
153.6 
148.6 
209.0 
182.9 
122.2 
124.5 


150.4 
153.3 
100.4 
109.9 
129.8 
130.9 
117.3 
135.9 
163.8 
123.5 

129.4 

155.0 

81.8 
125.6 
109.7 
106.2 
116.8 
129.8 
116.8 
100.1 
122.0 

91.0 
133.5 
140.9 
128.4 
104.6 
213.7 
146.6 
120.7 
117.1 
106.1 

93.5 
132.5 
126.4 
147.5 
125.5 

87.7 
146.9 
137.2 

82.0 
154.1 
114.5 
117.2 
155.1 
149.8 
211.1 
183.6 
121.8 
124.2 


138.3 
145.4 
96.2 
104.6 
125.5 
126.3 
111.9 
125.7 
158.4 
116.5 

124.3 

155.4 

79.7 
124.8 
117.6 
105.9 
109.0 
125.2 
113.1 

83.0 
117.4 

83.6 
129.1 
136.1 
121.0 

95.6 
196.9 
142.3 
116.5 
114.3 

96.7 

87.2 
129.7 
117.9 
136.5 
129.0 

89.2 
138.7 
125.3 

75.4 
145.0 
109.1 
111.4 
142.5 
138.7 
204.0 
178.4 
115.9 
119.6 


% 

75.96 
59.50 
68.94 
69.50 
82.49 
87.91 
77.99 
80.91 
84.77 
91.59 

84.63 

63.86 
84.78 
70.82 
62.26 
69.58 
100.97 
73.04 
71.45 
91.47 
79.87 
69.65 
83.65 
77.40 
82.78 
92.75 
116.18 
87.50 
91.52 
99.92 
85.00 
79.52 
78.35 
75.32 
78.63 
94.76 
75.32 
79.62 
108.94 
101.56 
108.12 
85.99 
74.75 
79.27 
73.83 
78.29 
83.94 
90.06 
81.53 


$ 

77.19 

58.27 
68.64 
68.40 
82.74 
87.75 
78.69 
80.97 
85.49 
91.42 

84.65 

65.21 
82.60 
71.38 
63.43 
69.63 

103.13 
72.86 
70.80 
92.25 
78.82 
69.05 
84.04 
77.80 
83.60 
93.77 

106.39 
88.46 
91.30 
96.28 
81.43 
79.87 
78.74 
76.06 
78.46 
94.95 
75.26 
80.24 

108.41 
98.97 

106.86 
84.85 
75.07 
79.93 
74.80 
79.00 
84.37 
89.97 
81.16 


$ 

72.10 




56.00 




65.62 




65.65 




79.20 




84.83 




75.94 




78.37 


Alberta (including Northwest Territories) 


82.64 
88.56 


Canada 


81.55 


Urban areas 

St. John's 


60.23 




77.70 




67.29 




61.12 




66.04 




99.85 




71.10 




68.76 




89.88 




77.23 




67.74 




80.53 


Ottawa — Hull 


75.34 




80.40 




91.26 




107.69 




84.58 




90.23 




95.98 




84.02 




77.02 




76.00 


Gait 


73.34 




77.06 




91.21 




75.61 




77.23 




106.26 




95.18 




106.24 




83.76 




72.79 




76.62 




72.25 




77.23 




81.26 




86.86 




80.38 







166 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES, AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls. DBS 
Note: Information for other industries is given in Employment and Payrolls 



Industry 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial machinery 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products , 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Other chemical products 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



Employment 



Nov. 
1963 



111. 

125. 

64. 
181. 

84. 

40. 
262. 
150. 
118. 
124. 
113. 
117. 
137. 
118. 

95. 
112. 

97. 
101. 
113. 

89. 

93. 

80. 

87. 

76. 

66. 
102. 

97. 
102. 
104. 

76. 
112. 
114. 
125. 

79. 
128. 
127. 
129. 
127. 
114. 

68. 
144. 
118. 
106. 
102. 
135. 
131. 
117. 
119. 
122. 
241. 
138. 
143. 

56. 
141. 
127. 
145. 
110. 
136. 
158. 
116. 
286. 
153. 

87. 
170. 
136. 
138. 
136. 
125. 
158. 
133. 
162. 
131. 
131. 
132. 
148. 
169. 
145. 
140. 
128. 



Oct. 
1963 



115.4 

127.8 

65.3 

185.8 

82.1 

39.5 

255.1 

157.0 

119.3 

124.6 

114.9 

122.2 

138.0 

141.5 

96.2 

112.0 

98.1 

79.2 

112.1 

89.3 

93.9 

81.1 

87.4 

75.8 

67.2 

101.4 

98.6 

102.6 

108.2 

76.4 

114.3 

116.5 

125.1 

82.1 

129.3 

128.9 

130.2 

127.4 

115.8 

69.6 

146.7 

117.9 

108.8 

103.1 

136.0 

132.5 

119.2 

119.8 

121.1 

238.9 

135.4 

138.4 

57.5 

143.7 

128.3 

145.1 

110.3 

137.7 

157.4 

115.9 

287.8 

156.4 

90.3 

170.5 

137.0 

139.0 

136.0 

125.8 

155.6 

133.9 

161.9 

138.3 

138.6 

137.8 

148.5 

172.0 

148.5 

139.8 

129.4 



Nov. 
1962 



114.3 

127.8 

68.6 

182.7 

84.7 

39.6 

268.6 

140.4 

114.7 

118.9 

111.2 

116.7 

137.0 

122.2 

95.6 

113.0 

98.1 

98.5 

109.7 

90.5 

97.3 

78.3 

83.7 

74.4 

63.9 

93.8 

92.7 

98.0 

96.5 

75.6 

106.4 

107.0 

119.1 

78.8 

127.3 

126. 

130. 

126. 

111. 

65. 

154. 

112. 

105. 

97.0 

131.6 

124.1 

115.4 

112.1 

113.7 

234.1 

119.3 

122.4 

56.6 

143.9 

122.7 

142.9 

102.3 

132.3 

152.7 

113.7 

279.5 

152.0 

91.2 

169.8 

136.9 

139.5 

130.0 

122.4 

144.3 

128.6 

154.0 

130.5 

126.8 

136.5 

141.1 

155.7 

133.4 

132.8 

124.3 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries 



Nov. 
1963 



$ 
101.05 

103.67 
84.74 
109.95 
110.32 
86.12 
125.29 
95.24 
88.29 
95.99 
81.24 
76.31 
84.96 
61.85 
86.46 
72.98 
106.76 
82.57 
90.99 
59.78 
57.39 
64.86 
70.98 
69.24 
64.32 
77.83 
54.16 
53.33 
53.80 
55.53 
76.00 
78.38 
73.51 
66.17 
103.12 
111.66 
82.95 
95.14 
98.89 
103.71 
101.17 
86.47 
87.38 
94.58 
95.92 
111.84 
94.81 
99.85 
109.57 
106.96 
135.39 
105.98 
90.08 
94.06 
98.69 
95.25 
96.57 
107.76 
92.08 
97.94 
89.19 
93.63 
82.70 
91.20 
129.14 
130.12 
102.21 
91.94 
114.31 
101.17 
76.74 
91.64 
98.93 
79.79 
89.28 
59.47 
45.62 
52.60 
84.63 



Oct. 
1963 



$ 
103.59 

104.63 
85.52 
110.86 
107.80 
82.47 
123.71 
93.32 
87.43 
94.57 
80.95 
75.27 
86.18 
58.95 
86.64 
73.03 
107.06 
88.74 
90.48 
58.91 
56.60 
63.78 
70.80 
68.62 
64.75 
77.59 
55.25 
53.96 
56.30 
55.34 
75.43 
77.39 
73.87 
65.84 
102.49 
110.33 
83.90 
94.67 
98.65 
100.97 
101.94 
85.97 
88.25 
94.01 
95.18 
111.88 
94.81 
98.28 
103.72 
105.97 
120.97 
99.48 
89.64 
93.34 
98.55 
95.77 
95.19 
108.00 
92.81 
100.20 
88.86 
93.98 
82.79 
88.96 
130.20 
131.60 
102.69 
91.05 
116.97 
101.42 
76.03 
94.22 
101.32 
82.48 
90.46 
59.36 
45.56 
52.75 
84.65 



Nov. 
1962 



$ 
100.70 

101.43 
83.59 

107.64 

104.78 
76.17 

122.04 
90.47 
84.55 
91.94 
77.93 
72.82 
82.25 
57.48 
83.19 
69.68 

103.19 
77.25 
89.26 
57.71 
55.25 
63.22 
68.76 
65.68 
63.39 
76.37 
51.71 
50.80 
51.22 
53.33 
73.36 
75.10 
72.21 
64.76 
98.10 

107.06 
77. 2& 
91.28 
96.10 
99.17 
97.92 
84.80 
83.27 
90.37 
92.71 

111.85- 
91.60 
96.69' 

100.81 
98.31 

123.07 

100.06 
84.80 
88.98 
95.72 
93.21 
91.61 

105.02 
90.19- 
98.56 
87.08 
89.66 
81.26 
86.86- 

122.12 

123.06 

100. 00 
87.03 

114.14 
99.45- 
72.62 
87.60 
95.36 
75.75 
86.76 
58.26 
44.32 
50.90 
81.55 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

73933-4— 6i 



• FEBRUARY 1964 



167 



TABLE C-4— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING, BY PROVINCES 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings DBS 

Note: Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 





Average Hours Worked 


Average Hourly Earnings* 




Nov. 
1963 


Oct. 
1963 


Nov. 
1962 


Nov. 
1963 


Oct. 
1963 


Nov. 
1962 




38.3 
40.8 
42.1 
42.1 
41.9 
40.4 
39.6 
39.9 
38.3 


39.3 
41.0 
41.2 
42.3 
41.5 
40.6 
39.3 
40.4 
38.0 


38.3 
39.9 
40.9 
42.0 
41.4 
40.0 
38.9 
39.7 
38.1 


% 

1.75 
1.70 
1.67 
1.77 
2.08 
1.81 
2.03 
2.03 
2.42 


S 

1.73 
1.69 
1.64 
1.77 
2.06 
1.80 
2.03 
2.02 
2.39 


S 

1.69 




1.64 




1.60 




1.70 




2.00 




1.77 




2.00 


Alberta (includes Northwest Territories) 


2.00 


British Columbia (includes Yukon Territory) 


2.32 



•Includes shift differential, premium pay for overtime, pay for paid holidays, pay for paid sick leave if paid through 
payroll but not if paid under insurance plan, incentive bonus but not annual bonus. 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 



Period 



Hours 
Worked 
Per Week 



Average 
Weekly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 



Current 
Dollars 



1949 
Dollars 



Monthly Average 1958. 
Monthly Average 1959. 
Monthly Average 1960. 
Monthly Average 1961. 
Monthly Average 1962. 

Last Pay Period in: 

1962— November 

December 



1963— January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October* 

November f. 



41.2 
37.3 

40.7 
40.7 
40.9 
41.0 
41.2 
40.9 
40.7 
40.9 
41.3 
41.4 
41.5 



1.66 
1.72 
1.78 
1.83 
1.88 



1.90 
1.94 

1.92 
1.93 
1.93 
1.95 
1.95 
1.94 
1.93 
1.93 
1.94 
1.96 
1.97 



66.77 
70.16 
71.96 
74.27 
76.55 



78.09 
72.34 

78.26 
78.45 
79.01 
80.05 
80.25 
79.64 
78.38 
78.82 
80.29 
80.93 
81.95 



160.0 
168.1 
172.4 
177.9 
183.4 



187.1 
173.3 

187.5 
187.9 
189.3 
191.8 
192.3 
190.8 
187.8 
188.8 
192.4 
193.9 
196.3 



127.7 
132.8 
134.5 
137.7 
140.1 



141.8 
131.3 

141.9 
142.3 
143.1 
145.0 
144.8 
142.9 
140.2 
141.6 
144.0 
144.7 
146.3 



Note:— The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. 

•Revised. 

tPreliminary. 



168 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



TABLE C-5-HOURS AND EARNINGS, BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry 



Average Weekly 


Average Hourly 


Average Weekly 




Hours 






Earnings 


Wages 


Nov. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Nov. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Nov. Oct. Nov. 


1963 


1963 


1962 


1963 


1963 


1962 


1963 


1963 


1962 








$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


42.6 


43.6 


42.2 


2.25 


2.25 


2.19 


96.01 


95.65 


92.57 


41.9 


42.5 


42.4 


2.34 


2.33 


2.26 


97.79 


98.85 


95.72 


42.7 


43.7 


43.7 


1.84 


1.82 


1.79 


78.62 


79.54 


78.05 


41.6 


42.1 


41.9 


2.52 


2.51 


2.44 


104.57 


105.56 


102.40 


43.8 


41.7 


40.5 


2.13 


2.13 


2.13 


93.28 


88.68 


86.37 


44.9 


42.9 


40.4 


1.90 


1.90 


1.82 


85.14 


81.25 


73.60 


42.1 


39.6 


40.8 


2.52 


2.55 


2.57 


106.18 


101.20 


104.87 


44.4 


43.9 


43.4 


2.07 


2.06 


2.00 


92.03 


90.51 


86.81 


41.5 


41.4 


41.2 


1.97 


1.96 


1.90 


81.95 


80.93 


78.09 


42.2 


41.8 


41.9 


2.15 


2.13 


2.06 


90.90 


88.96 


86.47 


40.8 


40.9 


40.5 


1.80 


1.79 


1.73 


73.35 


73.26 


70.20 


40.5 


40.6 


39.9 


1.71 


1.68 


1.64 


69.17 


68.32 


65.32 


40.6 


41.3 


40.4 


1.97 


1.98 


1.92 


80.08 


81.90 


77.37 


41.0 


40.9 


38.6 


1.32 


1.28 


1.24 


54.18 


52.57 


47.76 


42.8 


43.0 


41.4 


1.92 


1.91 


1.84 


82.03 


82.23 


76. 0& 


41.0 


40.8 


40.8 


1.65 


1.64 


1.55 


67.53 


66.88 


63.28 


41.0 


41.7 


41.6 


2.23 


2.24 


2.17 


91.43 


93.24 


90.36 


39.1 


39.3 


39.0 


2.49 


2.47 


2.39 


97.62 


97.23 


93.10 


39.1 


37.7 


37.6 


1.95 


2.18 


1.88 


76.25 


82.21 


70.79 


42.4 


42.4 


42.9 


2.01 


2.01 


1.96 


85.22 


85.18 


83.90 


40.8 


40.4 


41.2 


1.35 


1.34 


1.30 


55.00 


54.21 


53.54 


40.3 


40.0 


40.8 


1.30 


1.30 


1.25 


52.57 


51.89 


51.14 


41.9 


41.3 


42.1 


1.44 


1.43 


1.40 


60.24 


59.21 


59.01 


43.3 


43.3 


43.1 


1.50 


1.49 


1.44 


64.75 


64.49 


62.14 


43.5 


42.8 


41.5 


1.52 


1.52 


1.47 


65.99 


65.06 


61.19 


42.8 


43.0 


43.6 


1.37 


1.38 


1.33 


58.73 


59.14 


57.95 


43.6 


43.9 


44.5 


1.61 


1.60 


1.54 


70.12 


70.09 


68.48 


38.5 


39.2 


38.5 


1.27 


1.29 


1.22 


48.96 


50.46 


46.75 


38.4 


38.7 


38.2 


1.27 


1.28 


1.22 


48.94 


49.74 


46.48 


35.9 


37.3 


36.3 


1.35 


1.38 


1.26 


48.38 


51.63 


45.83 


42.2 


42.5 


42.3 


1.20 


1.20 


1.15 


50.63 


50.80 


48.77 


41.8 


41.6 


41.7 


1.75 


1.73 


1.68 


73.00 


72.03 


69.89 


40.7 


40.5 


40.5 


1.87 


1.84 


1.80 


76.16 


74.76 


72.74 


44.0 


43.8 


44.0 


1.58 


1.58 


1.52 


69.49 


69.20 


67.06 


43.2 


43.0 


42.7 


1.41 


1.42 


1.39 


61.00 


60.99 


59.24 


42.0 


41.9 


41.2 


2.32 


2.31 


2.26 


97.48 


96.78 


92.82 


42.1 


41.8 


41.2 


2.51 


2.50 


2.45 


105.85 


104.35 


100.91 


41.6 


42.0 


41.1 


1.82 


1.83 


1.74 


75.57 


76.83 


71.66 


39.1 


38.9 


38.9 


2.42 


2.41 


2.32 


94.58 


93.74 


90.17 


41.6 


41.5 


41.8 


2.26 


2.26 


2.19 


93.97 


93.86 


91.60 


41.0 


39.7 


40.5 


2.35 


2.36 


2.24 


96.43 


93.95 


90.91 


42.3 


42.5 


42.3 


2.20 


2.21 


2.12 


92.85 


93.93 


89.87 


42.7 


42.5 


43.3 


1.88 


1.88 


1.83 


80.41 


79.88 


79.17 


41.4 


42.4 


41.7 


1.94 


1.94 


1.85 


80.19 


82.10 


76.99 


42.0 


42.2 


41.8 


2.17 


2.14 


2.08 


91.10 


90.49 


86.86 


42.5 


42.0 


42.6 


2.13 


2.13 


2.05 


90.55 


89.54 


87.58 


40.3 


40.2 


41.1 


2.68 


2.68 


2.63 


107.76 


107.63 


107.78 


40.6 


41.2 


41.3 


2.16 


2.16 


2.08 


87.52 


89.00 


86.02 


43.3 


42.5 


42.3 


2.21 


2.20 


2.17 


95.55 


93.29 


91.83 


43.9 


42.1 


42.2 


2.40 


2.34 


2.27 


105.54 


98.29 


95.89 


42.5 


42.5 


40.7 


2.30 


2.30 


2.16 


97.91 


97.68 


87.94 


48.5 


43.6 


46.0 


2.73 


2.62 


2.58 


132.42 


114.35 


118.81 


44.0 


42.1 


43.3 


2.35 


2.24 


2.22 


103.24 


94.21 


96.04 


40.3 


40.2 


39.1 


2.19 


2.18 


2.12 


88.36 


87.85 


82.81 


41.0 


40.7 


40.2 


2.31 


2.27 


2.17 


94.80 


92.33 


87.39 


41.2 


41.3 


41.3 


2.24 


2.23 


2.16 


92.04 


92.19 


89.05 


42.0 


42.5 


42.5 


2.02 


2.01 


1.94 


84.63 


85.35 


82.56 


42.6 


42.4 


41.6 


2.16 


2.14 


2.07 


92.08 


90.72 


85.96 


40.2 


40.4 


40.5 


2.50 


2.50 


2.42 


100.45 


101.23 


98.20 


41.2 


41.3 


41.3 


1.96 


1.96 


1.91 


80.90 


80.98 


78.71 


41.5 


41.2 


42.0 


2.22 


2.22 


2.14 


92.00 


91.48 


89.99 


40.4 


40.5 


41.0 


1.76 


1.76 


1.71 


70.94 


71.15 


70.16 


41.0 


41.4 


41.0 


1.99 


1.98 


1.96 


81.71 


82.26 


80.30 


42.5 


42.8 


41.7 


2.20 


2.19 


2.14 


93.46 


93.63 


89.29 


41.5 


41.4 


41.0 


1.87 


1.87 


1.80 


77.48 


77.30 


73.81 


7 


44.4 


43.6 


2.01 


2.01 


1.94 


88.19 


88.88 


84.41 


J 


43.2 


43.1 


1.79 


1.79 


1.74 


77.24 


77.52 


75.20 


42.1 


41.0 


41.6 


2.06 


2.04 


1.96 


86.57 


83.73 


81.60 


42.1 


42.6 


41.4 


2.77 


2.80 


2.69 


116.46 


119.30 


111.25 


40.8 


41.3 


41.2 


2.19 


2.20 


2.13 


89.51 


90.93 


87.63 


40.2 


39.8 


39.8 


1.72 


1.71 


1.64 


69.01 


68.13 


65.44 


40.4 


41.6 


41.6 


2.54 


2.56 


2.47 


102.67 


106.36 


102.57 


41.8 


41.9 


41.8 


1.60 


1.58 


1.52 


66.77 


66.24 


63.55 


41.5 


. 41.8 


40.6 


1.99 


1.98 


1.88 


82.74 


82.73 


76.48 


41.0 


42.6 


40.7 


21.6 


2.17 


2.08 


88.55 


92.32 


84.57 


40.8 


42.0 


40.9 


2.36 


2.36 


2.27 


96.17 


99.08 


92.65 


41.4 


43.9 


40.5 


1.79 


1.80 


1.72 


73.87 


79.13 


69.72 


44.1 


44.8 


44.0 


2.04 


2.04 


1.98 


89.73 


91.49 


87.20 


37.3 


37.6 


38.0 


1.18 


1.17 


1.12 


43.82 


43.96 


42.66 


36.8 


37.1 


37.8 


1.15 


1.14 


1.08 


42.21 


42.38 


40.94 


39.9 


40.4 


40.1 


1.10 


1.10 


1.06 


44.04 


44.49 


42.63 



Mining...... 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non -durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

♦Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

•Iron and steel products , 

Agricultural implements , 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

•Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

•Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment. 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and ap 
pliances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

•Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products ; . . . 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Professional and scientific equipment 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laun dries and dry cleaning plants 

•Durable manufactured goods industries 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 



7964 



169 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

Statistics presented in the following tables relate to registrations for employment and 
vacancies notified by employers at NES offices. These data are derived from reports 
prepared in National Employment Service offices and processed in the Unemployment 
Insurance Section, DBS. See also Technical Note, page 91, January issue. 

TABLE D-l— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Period 



Unfilled Vacancies* 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



End of: 

January 1959.. 

January 1960. . 

January 1961.. 

January 1962.. 

January 1963.. 

February 1963.. 

March 1963.. 

April 1963.. 

May 1963.. 

June 1963.. 

July 1963.. 

August 1963.. 

September 1963.. 

October 1963.. 

November 1963.. 

December 1963 (» 

January 1904^) 



9,425 
8,206 
8,866 
11,428 

13,419 

13,412 
16,085 
24,675 
22,865 
23,271 
22,720 
25,610 
24,950 
24,210 
30,090 
18,913 
19,744 



9,295 
10,325 

8,377 
12,069 

12,532 

13,930 
16,459 
20,458 
21,723 
21,726 
19,096 
23,933 
22,037 
20,861 
22,737 
15,351 
15,680 



18,720 
18,531 
17,243 
23,497 

25,951 

27,342 
32,544 
45,133 
44,588 
44,997 
41,816 
49,543 
46,987 
45,071 
52,827 
34,264 
35,424 



615,788 
606,165 
668,766 
570,061 

579,205 

591,207 
584,889 
502,327 
341,869 
261,541 
241,035 
208,509 
187,793 
219,966 
285,688 
432,390 
498,726 



175,574 
180,129 
185,972 
161,094 

163,880 

163,864 
158,307 
149,907 
130,084 
127,631 
122,350 
106,482 
99,162 
106,320 
117,689 
131,532 
153.661 



791,362 
786,294 
854,738 
731,155 

743,085 

755,071 
743,196 
652,234 
471,953 
389,172 
363,385 
314,991 
286,955 
326,286 
403,377 
563,922 
652,387 



(^Latest figures subject to revision. 

*Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-2— REGISTRATIONS RECEIVED, VACANCIES NOTIFIED AND 

PLACEMENTS EFFECTED DURING YEAR, 1959-1962, AND DURING 

MONTH, DECEMBER, 1962-DECEMBER, 1963 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Year and Month 



1959— Year 

1960— Year 

1961— Year 

1962— Year 

1962— December. . 

1963— January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November. . 
Decern berO 



Registrations Received 



Male 



2,753,997 

3,046,572 

3,125,195 

3,177,423 

338,121 

331,104 
211,442 
209,852 
210.392 
215,307 
210,727 
235,602 
198,464 
208,088 
240,358 
279,655 
361,520 



Female 



1,037,536 
1,107,427 
1,106,790 
1,171,111 
94,533 

111,102 
75,073 
73,346 
81,258 
90,643 
96,469 

110,746 
94,109 
93,497 
99,236 

102,499 

102,561 



Vacancies Notified 



Male 



753,904 

724,098 

836,534 

1,010,365 

58,253 

56,086 
47,295 
54,427 
77,524 
100,832 
77,847 
86,824 
87,258 
99,517 
92,448 
90,258 
67,736 



Female 



421,927 

404,824 

469,119 

544,795 

40,470 

35,963 
31,852 
35,090 
39,149 
45,049 
43,687 
50,519 
54,999 
48,816 
44,154 
39,410 
39,222 



Placements Effected 



Male 



661,872 

641,872 

748,790 

897,285 

57,541 

46,669 
39,378 
42,942 
58,986 
88,778 
67,482 
73,561 
70,874 
87,392 
75,313 
73,086 
65,920 



Female 



324,201 

316,428 

371,072 

438,471 

39,613 

28,117 
23,755 
24,990 
26,378 
32,272 
34,041 
41,398 
41,013 
38,693 
30,894 
27,230 
38,947 



(^Preliminary — subject to revision. 



170 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



TABLE D-3— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED, BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX, 
DURING DECEMBER, 1963") 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Industry Group 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change from 

December 

1962 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels , 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits , 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except clothing) , 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries, 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment , 

Non-Ferrous Metal Products. . ._ , 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

Public Utility Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

Government Service 

Recreation Service 

Business Service 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



754 
1,575 

456 

275 

82 

35 

7 

57 

9,348 

859 
39 
99 
174 
369 
246 

1,402 
772 
339 

1,703 



1,789 
283 
314 
276 
23 
302 
259 

7,855 
5,236 
2,619 

4,058 

3,797 
197 
64 

165 

6,757 

2,389 
4,368 

433 

34,639 

700 
28,388 

217 
1,219 
4,105 



143 

28 

39 

10 
14 



15 

4,269 

420 

20 

85 

237 

266 

1,055 

174 

199 

336 

288 

177 

144 

355 

79 

12 

155 

267 

116 

48 



243 

123 
30 
90 

44 

5,144 

762 
4,382 

672 

28,249 

966 

18,568 

115 

405 

8,195 



897 
1,603 

495 

285 

96 

35 

7 

72 

13,517 

1,279 

59 

184 

411 

635 

1,301 

1,576 

971 

675 

1,991 

1,966 

427 

669 

355 

35 

457 

526 

7,971 

5,284 
2,687 

4,301 

3,920 
227 
154 



11,901 

3,151 
8,750 

1,095 

62,878 
1,666 

46,956 

332 

1,624 

12,300 



-1,615 

- 155 

- 77 

+ 58 

- 103 



14 
10 

763 

97 

11 

88 

42 

111 

166 

60 

380 

48 

87 

464 

120 

213 

8 

7 

110 

13 



+ 670 

+ 708 

- 38 

- 506 

- 473 

- 20 

- 13 

+ 89 

+ 933 

+ 446 

+ 487 

+ 160 

+7,451 

- 23 
+6,668 

- 69 

- 42 
+ 917 



65,920 



38,947 



101,867 



+7,713 



(^Preliminary — subject to revision. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



171 



TABLE D-l— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX, 

AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1963") 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Occupational Group 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Professional and Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Personal and Domestic Service Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Food and kindred products (incl. tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay and glass products 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications and public utility 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

GRAND TOTAL 



8,739 
17,944 

8,190 
38,252 

3,984 

8,776 

191,535 

1,754 

3,612 

18,873 

1,331 

1,324 

809 

15,434 

2,961 

469 

2,023 

60,839 

36,359 

975 

5,863 

26,804 

4,558 

7,547 

154,970 

7,115 

16,306 

6,781 

82,077 

42,691 



432,390 



1,814 

39,003 

11,410 

26,469 

37 

708 

21,984 

588 

14,391 

147 

446 

1,230 

50 

947 

1,138 

22 



87 

2 

1,764 

830 

327 

9 

30,107 

10,705 

411 

589 

3 

18,399 



131,532 



10,553 

56,947 

19,600 

64,721 

4,021 

9,484 

213,519 

2,342 

18,003 

19,020 

1,777 

2,554 

859 

16,381 

4,099 

491 

2,023 

60,845 

36,446 

977 

7,627 

27,634 

4,885 

7,556 

185,077 
17,820 
16,717 
7,370 
82,080 
61,090 



563,922 



(^Preliminary — subject to revision. 



172 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



TABLE D-5— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1963 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


ft) 

Dec. 31, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Dec. 31, 
1962 


0) 

Dec. 31, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Dec. 31, 
1962 


Newfoundland 


22,400 

4,627 
2,277 
15,496 

4,440 

2,821 
1,619 

26,896 

1,204 
1,842 
6,088 

799 
2,587 

632 
3,501 

957 
3,520 
1,417 
1,970 
2,379 

25,847 

4,833 
1,901 
1,595 
1,566 

323 
6,745 
2,223 
2,885 
2,020 

495 
1,261 

181,226 

2,382 

858 

1,120 

1,310 

1,042 

1,583 

2,018 

1,974 

448 

1,066 

2,635 

660 

847 

1,620 

2,866 

4,486 

4,159 

2,445 

936 

1,026 

1,619 

691 

4,765 

1,092 

811 

765 

2,307 

872 

2,210 

57,698 

1,799 

1,054 

14,429 

3,678 

4,145 

1,485 

2,611 

1,058 

1,139 

2,759 

2,961 

2,238 

2,415 

2,042 

4,342 


23,495 

5,075 
2,591 
15,829 

4,698 

2,883 
1,815 

28,142 

1,350 
1,881 
5,918 

969 
2,516 

659 
3,800 
1,043 
4,273 
1,516 
1,950 
2,267 

28,916 

4,769 
2,232 
1,923 
2,142 

383 
7,669 
2,731 
3,341 
1,467 

666 
1,593 

195,639 

2,655 
1,003 
1,131 
1,355 
1,231 
1,844 
2,158 
2,344 

465 
1,317 
2,453 

620 

812 
1,792 
3,394 
4,215 
4,596 
3,127 
1,252 
1,266 
2,085 

804 
3,958 
1,312 

829 

731 
2,992 

985 
2,183 
64,315 
1,791 
1,419 
13,522 
3,998 
4,807 
1,415 
2,367 
1,080 
1,194 
2,697 
2,563 
2,606 
3,326 
2,408 
4,881 1 


Quebec— Continued 


4,722 
2,628 
3,338 
5,504 
1,534 
2,319 
2,374 
2,341 

167,550 

411 
1,347 

1,822 

1,241 

1,259 

2,303 

621 

457 

1,826 

1,048 

961 

2,945 

343 

792 

743 

2,365 

1,091 

355 

684 

1,661 

11,527 

1,057 

532 

907 

2,274 

705 

2,975 

1,400 

680 

402 

5,049 

3,499 

1,263 

734 

514 

1,451 

3,039 

1,885 

774 

947 

4,722 

6,974 

1,570 

605 

1,634 

798 

2,612 

526 

3,256 

1,210 

985 

588 

4,039 

965 

2,749 

2,273 

1,506 

606 

624 

1,012 

4,082 

449 

1,699 

40,589 

791 

988 

689 

2,416 

3,544 

6,440 

720 






5,690 
2,501 
2,317 


Grand Falls... 






Thetford Mines 






6,004 


Prince Edward Island 


Val d'Or . . 


1,713 




Valleyfield 


2,695 






2,602 




Ville St. Georges..., 


2,819 




Ontario 




179,398 

438 






Halifax 




1,357 






1,759 






1,213 






1,299 






2,709 






730 






371 






2,568 


Truro 




955 






1,050 






3,151 


New Brunswick 


Elliot Lake 


424 




Fort Erie 


808 






702 




Fort William 


2,627 
1,375 




Gait 




398 






700 




Guelph 


1,544 






11,625 






1,043 






860 






1,156 






2,179 


Quebec 




950 




Kitchener 


3,070 




1,646 






666 






417 






5,190 






3,224 






1,328 






841 






654 






1 331 






2,824 






1 981 






777 


Gaspe 


Orillia 


1,086 


Granby 




4,612 


Hull 




7,543 
1 823 






Jonquiere 




654 






1,850 


Lac-Megantic 


Perth 


606 


La Malbaie 




2,979 
569 


La Tuque 








3,472 


Louiseville 




1,572 


Magog 




913 


Maniwaki 




734 


Matane 




4,292 
1,596 


Mont-Laurier 


St. Thomas. . . 


Montmagny 




2,480 


Montreal , 




3,417 
1,775 


New Richmond 




Port Alfred 


Smiths Falls 


574 


Quebec 




827 


Rimouski 




1,043 


Riviere du Loup 


Sudbury. 


5,565 
769 


Roberval 


Rouyn 


Timmins 


1 725 


Ste. Agathe des Monts 


41,472 






804 


Ste.Therese 


Walkerton 


797 


Ste. Hyacinthe 


715 


St. Jean 


Welland 


2,419 


St. Jerome 




3,491 
8,453 


Sept-Iles 




Shawinigan 


Woodstock 


831 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



173 



TABLE D-5— REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, BY LOCAL OFFICE AREAS, 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1963 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 





Registrations 


Office 


Registrations 


Office 


(i) 

Dec. 31, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Dec. 31, 
1962 


(i) 

Dec. 31, 
1963 


Previous 
Year 

Dec. 31, 
1962 




2:5,268 

2,396 
1,631 

175 
1,106 

421 
17,539 

18,692 

386 

411 

1,358 

1,294 

2,595 

4,407 

4,372 

960 

435 

2,474 

31,044 

464 
9,294 

595 
13,970 

324 

821 
2,788 
1,420 
1,368 


29,148 

2,626 
1,831 

198 
1,327 

509 
22,657 

21,002 

457 
474 
1,600 
1,394 
3,004 
4,902 
4,764 
1,009 
484 
2,914 

32,040 

495 

10,484 

561 

13,235 

492 

861 

3,085 

1,575 

1,252 


British Columbia 


62,559 

2,423 
1,495 
1,008 
1,215 
1,039 
1,743 
1,404 


68,526 






2,431 






1,559 


Flin Flon 




1,306 






1,247 


The Pas 




1,270 






1,531 






1 401 






179 






1,363 
1,590 

977 
9,119 
1,925 

797 
1,710 
1,836 


1,352 






1 556 






1,030 


North Battleford 




9,709 






1,665 






762 






2,494 






1,853 






529 






755 

900 

25,107 

1,864 

3,774 

515 

563,922 

432,390 
131,532 


810 




Trail 


1,006 


Alberta 




28,546 
1,950 










3,683 






657 




CANADA 






611,001 










473,575 






Red Deer 


137,429 










(^Preliminary subject to revision. 

( 2 >Includes 1094 registrations reported by the Magdalen Islands local office. 

Note: Effective September 28, 1963 the area served by Princeton local office is served by the Kamloops and 
Penticton local offices. 

Effective November 29, 1963 the Kitimat local office closed and the area served by this office was transferred 
to Prince Rupert local office. 



174 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7964 



E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment insurance statistics are concerned with numbers of persons covered by 
insurance and claimants for benefit at Unemployment Insurance Commission local 
offices. The data are compiled in the Unemployment Insurance Section, DBS from 
information supplied by the UIC. For further information regarding the nature of the 
data see Technical Note, page 86, January issue. 



TABLE E-l 



ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT. 



Source: Statistical Report on The Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



End of: 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants 


1963— October 


4,189,000 
4.114,000 
4,125,000 
4,078,000 
4,068,000 
3,996,000 
4,173,000 
4,242,000 
4,264.000 
4,259.000 

4,223,000 
4.110,000 
4,009,000 


3,970,100 
3,927,700 
3,932,500 
3,859,000 
3,847,700 
3,725,100 
3,607,100 
3.556,700 
3,543,500 
3,555,900 

3,631,000 
3,735,800 
3,764,900 


218,900 




186,300 




192,500 


July 


219,000 




220.300 




270,900 




565,900 




685,300 




720,500 


January 


703,100 


1962— December 


592,000 




374,200 


October 


244,100 







Collective Bargaining Review 



{Continued from page 124) 

Part III— Settlements Reached During January 1964 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures 
on the number of employees covered are approximate.) 

Cdn. Marconi, Montreal, Que. — Salaried Empl. Assn. (Ind.): 2-yr. agreement covering 
850 empl. — wage increase of 2% for empl. below mid-point of rate range; bi-weekly increase of 
$6 to $9 for empl. at or above mid-point of rate range; vacation pay to be percentage of gross 
earnings (previously percentage of regular pay); limit on accumulation of sick leave credits in- 
creased from 30 to 40 days; agreement to expire Dec. 31, 1965. 

CNR, System-Wide— Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 8,600 empl.— 
wage increases of 2% eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 1% eff. Sept. 1, 1964 and 2% eff. May 1, 1965; agreement 
to expire Dec. 31, 1965. 

Council of Printing Industries, Toronto, Ont. — Typographcial Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 
2-yr. agreement covering 600 empl. — wage increases of 6$ an hr. retroactive to June 1, 1963, 7tf 
an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 7<J an hr. eff. June 1, 1964, and 6£ an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1965; 3 wks. 
vacation after 6 yrs. of service (formerly after 8 yrs.); rate for journeyman on June 1, 1965 will 
be $3.35 an hr.; agreement to expire May 31, 1965. 

CPR, System-Wide — Locomotive Engineers (Ind.): 3-yr. agreement covering 1,900 empl. — 
wage increases of 3% eff. March 16, 1964, 3% eff. Dec. 16, 1964, 3% eff. Sept. 16, 1965 and 
3% eff. June 16, 1966 for yard engineers; wage increases of 1% eff. March 16, 1964, 1% eff. 
March 16, 1965 and \\% eff. March 16, 1966 for road engineers; agreement to expire March 
15, 1967. 

CPR, System-Wide— Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 5,700 empl. — 
wage increases of 2% eff. Jan. 1, 1964, 1% eff. Sept. 1, 1964 and 2% eff. May 1, 1965; agreement 
to expire Dec. 31, 1965. 

Dress Mfrs. Guild (Sportswear Drv.), Toronto, Ont. — Ladies' Garment Wkrs. (AFL- 
CIO/CLC): 2i-yr. agreement covering 1,800 empl. — general wage increase of 7%; agreement to 
expire July 31, 1966. 

Manitoba Hydro — IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,500 empl. — wage 
increases for most empl., amount depending on classification; 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of 
service (previously no provision for 4 wks. vacation); compulsory check-off of union dues; 
improvements in stand-by pay; agreement to expire March 31, 1965. 

TCA, Company- Wide — TCA Sales Empl. (Ind.); 2-yr. agreement covering 1,400 empl. — 
wage increases of approx. 4% retroactive to Sept. 1963 and approx. 3% eff. Nov. 1964; agree- 
ment to expire Nov. 1965. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



175 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 

NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, 

NOVEMBER 29, 1963 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of The Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



Province and sex 



Total 
claimants 



Number of weeks on claim 
(based on 20 per cent sample) 



1-4 



5-13 



14-26 



27 or more" 



Total 
Claimants 



October 31 
1963 



Nov. 30 
1962 



Canada 

Male... 

Female 

Newfoundland 

Male 

Female 

Prince Edward Island 

Male 

Female 

Nova Scotia 

Male 

Female 

New Brunswick 

Male 

Female 

Quebec 

Male 

Female 

Ontario 

Male 

Female 

Manitoba 

Male 

Female 

Saskatchewan 

Male 

Female 

Alberta 

Male 

Female 

British Columbia 

Male 

Female 



303,353 

216.940 

86,413 



182,832 
143,518 
39,314 



72,391 
46,151 
26,240 



30,155 
16,486 
13,669 



17,975 
10,785 
7,190 



218,866 
143,553 
75,313 



374,191 

274,881 

99,310 



12,169 

10,707 

1,462 

1,858 
1,378 



14,340 
11,219 
3,121 

13,540 
9,995 
3,545 

91,277 
65,987 
25,290 

89,677 
58,904 
30,773 

12,266 
9,065 
3,201 

8,116 
6,032 
2,084 

21,182 
15,420 
5,762 

38,928 
28,233 
10,695 



8,587 
7,951 



1,481 

1,143 

338 

8,302 
6,894 
1,408 

8,551 
6,555 
1,996 

53,072 
41,711 
11,361 

52,043 
37,846 
14,197 

7,757 



5,490 

4,621 

869 

13,142 
11,135 
2,007 

24,407 
19,374 
5,033 



2,224 

1,817 

407 

186 
108 
78 



,397 
,475 
922 

,011 
,033 
978 



23,161 
15,639 
7,522 

21,737 
12,729 
9,008 

2,585 
1,501 
1,084 

1,556 
910 
646 

5,155 
2,805 
2,350 

9,379 
6,134 
3,245 



885 
646 
239 

137 
73 

64 

1,672 

1,175 

497 

1,113 
781 
332 

9,610 
5,351 
4,259 

9,785 
4,806 
4,979 

1,161 
724 
437 

746 
331 
415 

1,948 



3,098 
1,619 
1,479 



473 
293 
180 

54 
54 



969 
675 
294 

865 
626 
239 

5,434 

3,286 
2,148 

6,112 
3,523 
2,589 

763 
552 
211 

324 
170 
154 

937 
500 
437 

2,044 

1,106 

938 



5,809 
4,803 
1,006 

774 
487 
287 

9,662 
7,045 
2,617 

8,768 
6,244 
2,524 

69,817 
47,685 
22,132 

69,843 
42,324 
27,519 

7,928 
4,554 
3,374 

4,276 
2,345 
1,931 

13,290 
8,891 
4,399 

28,699 
19,175 
9,524 



14,032 

12,720 

1,312 

2,504 

1,914 

590 

19,320 
15,998 
3.322 

17,990 
14,269 
3,721 

111,469 
82,014 
29,455 

109,821 
74,468 
35,353 

18,705 
14,190 
4,515 

11,641 
8,813 
2,828 

22,393 
16,474 
5,919 

46,316 
34,021 
12,295 



* The bulk of the cases in this group were on claim from 27-39 weeks. 
Note: Values less than 50 subject to relatively large sampling variability. 



176 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOE BENEFIT BY PROVINCE, 

NOVEMBER, 1963 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 





Claims filed at 
Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims 
at End of Month 


Pending 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




7,773 

1,365 

8,472 

8,219 

55,477 

54,802 

9,379 

6,104 

13,110 

24,674 


6,484 

1,170 

6,265 

6,202 

37,761 

36,939 

7,072 

4,622 

8,909 

17,188 


1,289 

195 

2,207 

2,017 

17,716 

17,863 

2,307 

1,482 

4,201 

7,486 


5,146 

650 

6,393 

6,639 

44,636 

47,368 

7,691 

3,674 

11,015 

20,077 


3,945 

460 

4,632 

5,035 

33,128 

34,107 

5,347 

2,502 

7,851 

14,105 


1,201 

190 

1,761 

1,604 

11,508 

13,261 

2,344 

1,172 

3,164 

5,972 


3,771 




876 




3,550 




3,099 




24,377 




20,923 




3,064 




3,195 




4,836 


British Columbia (incl. Yukon Territory) 


9,916 


Total, Canada, November 1963 

Total, Canada, October 1963 


189,375 
126,219 
243,563 


132,612 
79,690 
175,672 


56,763 
46,529 
67,891 


153,289 
117,375 
194,160 


111,112 
80,555 
149,888 


42,177 
36,820 
44,272 


77,607 
41,521 


Total, Canada, November 1962 


99.470 



* In addition, revised claims received numbered 32,512. 

t In addition, 31,589 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 3,285 were special requests not granted and 2,535 
appeals by claimants. There were 8,132 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



TABLE E-4— BENEFIT PAYMENTS, BY PROVINCE, NOVEMBER, 1963 

Source: Statistical Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, DBS 



Province 


Weeks 
Paid* 


Amount 

of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 




18,351 

2,404 

28,864 

27,445 

206,961 

204,171 

24,937 

12,516 

37,457 

81,875 


426,280 




50,163 




618,755 




591,878 




5,002,907 




4,887,937 


Manitoba 


587,591 




287,578 


Alberta 


944,083 




2,070,154 






Total, Canada, November 1963 


644,981 
595,019 
793,921 


15,467,326 


Total, Canada, October 1963 


13,989,450 


Total, Canada, November 1962 


18,933,673 







'"Weeks paid" represents the total of complete and partial weeks of benefit paid during the month. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



177 



F — Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

1957 Weighted 

(1949 = 100) 

Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Total 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Transpor- 
tation 


Health 

and 
Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 


1959— Year 


127.2 

128.4 

129.2 

130.7 

132.0 
132.1 
132.1 
132.3 
132.3 
132.8 
133.5 
133.9 
133.4 
133.6 
134.0 
134.2 

134.2 


122.2 

122.6 

124.0 

126.2 

129.0 
129.4 
128.9 
128.9 
128.3 
129.7 
132.5 
133.2 
131.3 
130.4 
130.8 
131.4 

131.4 


131.5 
132.9 
133.2 

134.8 

135.9 
135.9 
136.0 
136.0 
136.0 
136.0 
135.9 
136.3 
136.5 
136.6 
136.9 
137.0 

137.3 


109.7 

111.0 

112.5 

113.5 

114.7 
114.8 
115.6 
115.7 
115.6 
116.0 
115.7 
115.9 
116.1 
118.3 
118.7 
118.9 

117.7 


140.5 

141.1 

140.6 

140.4 

139.8 
139.6 
139.6 
139.2 
140.6 
140.3 
140.7 
141.0 
141.1 
141.2 
141.2 
140.6 

141.1 


151.0 

154.8 

155.3 

158.3 

159.8 
159.9 
159.9 
162.1 
162.6 
162.7 
162.6 
162.8 
162.7 
163.8 
164.8 
165.4 

165.4 


144.4 

145.6 

146.1 

147.3 

148.6 
148.6 
148.6 
148.0 
148.8 
149.3 
148.8 
148.8 
149.1 
150.5 
151.0 
151.4 

152.1 


113.8 


1960— Year. . . 


115.8 


1961— Year 


116.3 


1962— Year 


117.8 


1963 — January 


117.8 




118.0 




118.0 




117.9 




117.8 




117.8 


July... 


118.2 




118.1 




118'. 1 




118.1 




118.5 




118.5 




118.5 







TABLE F-2— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA 
AT THE BEGINNING OF DECEMBER, 1963 

(1949 = 100) 



Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 



St. John's, Nfld 

Halifax 

Saint John 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Winnipeg 

Saskatoon-Regina 

Edmonton-Calgary. . 
Vancouver 



All Items 


Food 


Housing 


Cloth- 


Trans- 
porta- 
tion 


Health 

and 
Personal 


Recre- 
ation 
and 


Dec. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1962 


1963 


1963 






ing 


Care 


Reading 


118.1 


120.8 


120.3 


117.3 


115.5 


113.6 


121.2 


160.6 


153.5 


130.8 


131.4 


131.9 


126.6 


133.2 


128.6 


138.2 


166.1 


167.2 


131.9 


133.3 


133.8 


130.1 


132.2 


126.2 


143.3 


185.8 


153.8 


132.3 


133.9 


134.3 


137.5 


135.1 


111.4 


158.7 


172.1 


148.2 


132.7 


134.5 


134.8 


131.9 


136.9 


125.3 


154.4 


170.0 


143.4 


133.0 


135.2 


135.3 


129.1 


140.0 


123.7 


135.3 


163.9 


189.9 


130.1 


131.2 


131.1 


129.4 


128.0 


125.1 


134.9 


179.1 


140.6 


128.3 


128.7 


129.0 


127.3 


126.9 


130.2 


137.0 


147.3 


148.4 


127.4 


127.7 


128.0 


123.3 


126.8 


126.9 


130.7 


168.8 


146.7 


130.6 


131.8 


131.9 


130.5 


134.7 


121.4 


139.0 


151.2 


150.1 



101.1 
124.3 
124.5 
121.7 
123.8 
121.3 
125.5 
119.4 
119.4 
120.9 



N.B. Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

0>St. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



178 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



G — Strikes and Lockouts 

Statistical information on work stoppages in Canada is compiled by the Economics 
and Research Branch of the Department of Labour on the basis of reports from the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission. The first three tables in this section cover strikes 
and lockouts involving six or more workers and lasting at least one working day, and 
strikes and lockouts lasting less than one day or involving fewer than six workers but 
exceeding a total of nine man-days. The number of workers involved includes all workers 
reported on strike or locked out, whether or not they all belonged to the union directly 
involved in the disputes leading to work stoppages. Workers indirectly affected, such as 
those laid off as a result of a work stoppage, are not included. For further notes on 
the series see, page 954, October 1963 issue. 

TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1958-1963 



Month or Year 



Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 



Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 



Strikes and 
Lockouts 



Workers 
Involved 



Duration in Man-Days 



Man-Days 



Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 



1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1962: December. 

*1963: January... 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 



251 
201 

268 
272 
290 



259 
216 
274 
287 
311 

28 

24 
37 
32 
42 
44 
63 
61 
55 
63 
81 
44 
32 



111,475 
95,120 
49.408 
97,959 
74,332 

3,565 

4,559 
7,002 
5,207 
8,562 
6,214 
7,302 
17,101 
11,597 
9,583 
24,861 
6,193 
4,341 



2,816,850 
2,226,890 
738,700 
1,335.080 
1,417,900 

55,110 

79,780 
75,280 
34,080 
47,180 
30,300 
78,400 

181,030 
73,340 
86.320 

138,980 
51,020 
38,320 



0.25 
0.19 
0.06 
0.11 
0.11 

0.05 

0.07 
0.07 
0.03 
0.05 
0.02 
0.07 
0.15 
0.06 
0.08 
0.11 
0.05 
0.03 



•Preliminary. 



TABLE G-2-STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
DECEMBER, 1963, BY INDUSTRY 

(Preliminary) 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
DECEMBER, 1963, BY JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man- 
Days 












3 
12 
3 
2 
6 


1,310 

2,111 

209 

74 
176 


2,970 




26,090 




3,270 

90 

3,590 


Transpn. and utilities. . . 
Trade 




Service 


6 


461 


2,310 












All industries 


32 


4,341 


38,320 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 

Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man- 
Days 




1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
14 


24 

11 

1,216 

145 

1,636 

1,201 


410 


Prince Edward Island. . 


250 
1,220 


New Brunswick 


3,050 
22,370 




8,740 






















British Columbia 

Federal 


4 


108 


2,280 










All jurisdictions. . . . 


32 


4,341 


38,320 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 



179 



TABLE G-4— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

DECEMBER, 1963 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 
Employer 
Location 



Union 



Workers 
Involved 



Duration in 
Man-Days 



De- Accu 
cember mulated 



Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 



Major Issues 
Result 



Mines 

Mineral Fuels 
Dominion Coal No. 26 

Collierv 
Glace Bay, N.S. 

Manufacturing 
Food and Beverages 
Viau Limitee, 
Montreal, Que. 

Knitting Mills 
Regent Knitting Mills, 
St. Jerome, Que. 



Wood 

Bellerive Veneer and Plywoods, 

Mont-Laurier, Que 

Paper 

Kimberly-Clark Canada 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. 



Primary Metals 
Page Hersey Tubes, 
Welland, Ont. 



Construction 
Janin Construction, 
St. Hyacinthe, Que. 

Trade 

Irving Refining, 

East Saint John, N.B. 

Service 

Education 

Roman Catholic School Board, 

Ste. Foy, Que. 



Mine Workers Loc. 4520 
(Ind.) 



CNTU 



Textile Workers' Union 
Loc. 1475 (AFL-CIO 
/CLC) 



CNTU 



Pulp and Paper Mill Work- 
ers Loc. 933 (AFL-CIO 
/CLC) 



U.E. Loc. 523 (Ind.) 



Building Workers' Federa 
ation (CNTU) 



Oil Workers Loc. 9-691 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Corporation des Institu 
teurs et Institutrices 
Catholique (Ind.) 



1,216 



524 



650 



107 



179 



900 



155 



156 
(29) 



370 



1,220 



10,740 



1,220 



34,840 



34,690 



2,310 



3,040 



5,400 



2,830 



3.050 



1,110 



13,680 



8,590 



5,400 



11.020 



1,110 



Dec. 12 
Dec. 16 



Sep. 26 
Dec. 31 



Aug. 13 
Dec. 12 



Aug. 30 



Oct. 19 
Dec. 26 



Dec. 19 
Dec. 30 



Dec. 4 



Sep. 16 



Dec. 6 
Dec. 11 



In sympathy with two 
workers who were sus- 
pended~ Return of workers 



Wages~30f£ an hr. increase 
over a 3-yr. agreement. 



Wages, hours, working con- 
ditions~4<S an hr. increase 
July 1963, ht an hr. July 
1964, and H July 1965; pro- 
gressive reduction in hours 
from 49 to 47 per wk., 
mproved vacations and 
statutory holidays. 

Wages, hours, working con- 
ditions ~ 



Wages~9^ an hr. increase 
Jan. 1, 1964, H Jan. 1, 1965; 
U July 1, 1965, H Jan. 1, 
1966 and ii July 1, 1966; 
$36 retroactive pay. 



Suspension of 18 workers 
for refusal to work over- 
time~ Return of workers. 



Wages, seniority, grievance 
committee ~ 



Wages' 



Salary scales ~ Return of 
workers further negotia- 
tions. 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



Recent Regulations 

(.Continued from page 147) 

It also authorized the establishment of a 
professional advisory committee to be 
known as the "Radiological Health Com- 
mittee." Among other duties, this Com- 
mittee is required to advise the Minister 
concerning all aspects of protection against 
the hazards of ionizing radiation, and to 
prepare a code of recommended practice for 
the guidance of persons in control of or 
using radiation equipment. 

In November, after consultation with the 
Radiological Health Committee, regulations 
were issued defining the maximum permis- 
sible dose. In these regulations (O.C. 



2003/63 gazetted November 15), the 
"maximum permissible dose" is defined as 
follows: 

(a) the dose of X-radiation to the gonads, 
blood-forming organs or lens of the eye of 
any occupational worker equivalent to three 
rems in any period of 13 consecutive weeks; or 

(b) in the case of an occupational worker 
of N years of age, the total accumulated ex- 
posure of X-radiation equivalent to 5(N-18) 
rems. 

For purposes of these regulations, the 
dose in rems is to be considered numerically 
equal to the exposure in roentgens. 



180 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1964 




THE 



IVBOUR 
AZETTE 




* <& 









# 



c^qfl' 




Social Insurance Number Project (p. 182) 



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MARCH 31, 1964 



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(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 

R. M. Dyke 

Editor, French Edition 
Circulation Manager 



J. E. Abbey 



Vol. LXIV, No. 3 CONTENTS March 1964 

Department Today: Social Insurance Number Project 182 

50 Years Ago This Month 183 

Notes of Current Interest 184 

Pension Plans in Canadian Industry 187 

Annual Meeting, Canadian Construction Association 190 

OFL Education Conference 193 

Trustees Plan to Establish Advisory Council for Seamen .. 195 

Handicapped Businessmen Successful 196 

Latest Labour Statistics 197 

Employment and Unemployment, February 198 

Socio-Medical Problems of Working Women 200 

Early Returns on Older Worker Incentive Program 202 

Collective Bargaining Review: 

Duration of Negotiations, 1963 203 

Collective Bargaining Scene 204 

International Labour Organization: 

158th Session of ILO Governing Body 208 

Technical Meeting, Food and Drink Industries 209 

Technical Conference on Employment Policy 210 

Teamwork in Industry 212 

Certification and Conciliation: 

Certification Proceedings 213 

Conciliation Proceedings 215 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 217 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 221 

Unemployment Insurance — NES: 

Monthly Report on Operation of the Act 223 

Monthly Report on Placement Operations 224 

Decisions of the Umpire 224 

Wage Schedules 227 

Price Indexes 232 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library. ... 233 
LABOUR STATISTICS 239 



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74338-5—1 



Department of Labour Today 

Social Insurance Number Project 

At beginning of April, with Unemployment Insurance Commission 
as agent, federal government will begin registration of all 
employees preparatory to allotment of Social Insurance Number 



At the beginning of April the federal 
Government, through the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission, will begin registering 
all Canadian employees except those in the 
armed forces, in private domestic service, 
agricultural workers, and members of the 
clergy and religious orders. Each person 
registered will be allotted a nine-digit 
Social Insurance Number. 

The start of the registration was set for 
the beginning of April so that it can be com- 
pleted before the end of June, when 1963- 
64 unemployment insurance books expire. 

An estimated total of more than 6,000,000 
employees across Canada will be required 
to register. 

Reasons for System 

In outlining to key personnel in the 
registration the reasons for introducing the 
new numbering system, the Minister of 
Labour said: "The present unemployment 
insurance numbering system has become 
obsolete because of the growth in the labour 
force and the fact that electronic data proc- 
essing equipment is being used more and 
more in government record-keeping." 

It therefore was opportune, he said, in 
line with the Glassco Commission sug- 
gestion, to introduce a new numbering 
system: a single number which is applicable 
to all employees — "those who are insured 
under the Unemployment Insurance Act 
and those who are not insured." 

The numbering system, the Minister said, 
has been designed to be broad and flexible 
enough to be adapted to requirements of 
the proposed Canada Pension Plan and 
other social security measures. 

The Social Insurance Number card will 
have three sections. The employee's part 
will contain only the employee's signature 
in addition to the nine-digit number. The 
second part, a duplicate, will be filed for 
safe keeping. 

The third section will be retained by the 
employer. It will have, in addition to the 
Social Insurance Number, the name of the 
employee, the birth date (day and month 
only, not the year) and the former un- 
employment insurance number. 

An employer — one who has one full- 
time or one part-time employee on payroll — 
will be required to deliver to each employee 
his Social Insurance Number card. 



To allay fears of regimentation and loss 
of identity, the Minister of Labour pointed 
out that "identity will not be lost and 
regimentation will not be the end result." 
And the real purpose of the program was 
not to obtain an inventory of manpower. 

Record-Keeping 

"Essentially, the project is one to ensure 
better record-keeping," he explained. "There 
is nothing in additional information pro- 
vided by the applicant for a Social Insurance 
Number that has not already been on 
record in the federal Government." The 
Minister pointed out also that much of the 
information that is requested for this 
registration was also asked for in the 
application for an unemployment insurance 
number for the past 22 years. 

To illustrate the complexities of record- 
keeping on a large scale, the Minister said: 
"The need for more details of an individual 
for positive identification is appreciated 
when you realize there are now 50,000 
Smiths in the Unemployment Insurance 
Commission's master index, and well over 
10,000 Smiths have the initial 'J'." 

It will not be necessary to carry the card 
with the Social Insurance Number on it. It 
has been suggested only that the card be 
carried so that it would be conveniently 
available, for example, for those who are 
seeking or changing employment from time 
to time. In this way, the new employer 
could be given the number immediately. 

Another Misconception 

Another misconception that appeared 
when the new registration system was first 
announced was the belief that the system 
was intended for use in extending coverage 
under unemployment insurance. "There is 
no consideration in the Social Insurance 
Number project of broadening the group 
who will pay unemployment insurance." 

Another erroneous belief has been that 
there was a relationship with the work of 
the Emergency Measures Organization. "I 
can assure you there is absolutely no 
present relationship between the numbering 
project and organizing and implementing 
plans for survival in the event of atomic 
attack". 



182 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



From the Labour Gazette, March 1914 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Dispute between three unions and Quebec Shoe Manufacturers' 
Association that led to a strike at two establishments and a 
lockout elsewhere in the industry was settled in second month. 



A dispute involving 3,000 employees in 
shoe manufacturing establishments operated 
by members of the Quebec Shoe Manu- 
facturers' Association, which led to a 
strike in the latter part of December 1913, 
was settled in February 1914. The circum- 
stances of the dispute and its settlement 
were described in the Labour Gazette of 
March 1914. 

The employees involved were members of 
three unions: the Canadian Federation of 
Shoe Workers (leather cutters), the Federa- 
tion of Boot and Shoe Workers (machin- 
ists), and the Boot and Shoe Workers' 
Union (shoe lasters). 

"During October 1913, notices were 
posted in the various factories setting forth 
the working conditions under which such 
factories would be operated," the Gazette's 
report said. "The conditions imposed, 
besides fixing the rate of wages and hours 
of employment, gave the employers the 
exclusive right of engaging, discharging or 
suspending employees, and established the 
employer, or his representative, as the sole 
judge of the competence and ability of an 
employee to do specified work. 

"The terms of the employers were 
generally accepted at the time by the em- 
ployees. In December, however, employees 
in two establishments objected to the em- 
ployment of a non-unionist, and struck 
work." The two firms affected employed 
about 220 hands. 

At the end of December, all the 
remaining members of the Shoe Manu- 
facturers' Association decided to close 
down because their employees had refused 
to sign individually the agreement govern- 
ing conditions of employment. The effect of 
this was an almost complete shutdown of 
the shoe-manufacturing industry in Quebec. 

Finally, with the assistance of one of the 
conciliation officers of the Department of 
Labour, a settlement of the dispute was 
reached in February. The settlement was 
described as follows: 

"By the terms of the agreement, the men 
were not required to sign individual con- 
tracts, but it was arranged that a commit- 
tee of three representatives from each of 
the unions interested should sign for them. 
A monetary penalty was fixed for the ful- 
filment of the contract, the amount being 
$600, or $200 from each union. In case 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

74338-5— li 



• MARCH 1964 



of non-fulfilment of the terms of the con- 
tract the money will be confiscated for the 
use of the Shoe Manufacturers' Association. 

"Provision was also made for cases of 
individual grievances. Any employee hav- 
ing such will be required to make a deposit 
of $25 before the case is heard by the 
Board of Arbitration, and the party in 
default will have to bear the costs of the 
hearing. Another clause exacts that the 
union interested shall secure legal recogni- 
tion by incorporation as soon as possible." 

Wages in February 1914 were moving 
both up and down, the Labour Gazette 
reported. 

"An important increase affecting 300 
printers went into effect at Quebec. By this 
change the minimum weekly wages were 
raised from $15 to $16.50." This rate was 
to last for two years, when an additional in- 
crease of $1.50 was to be granted. 

"It was reported that the employees of 
the Canadian General Electric Company, 
who received an increase in wages last sum- 
mer, had their wages reduced during 
February. Another reduction went into 
effect at Niagara Falls, where the Toronto 
Power Company reduced the wages of its 
labourers from 25 cents to 20 cents an 
hour. 

"Policemen at Hamilton were given in- 
creases ranging from $50 to $100 a year; 
the minimum wage for civic labourers was 
raised from 22 to 25 cents an hour." 

"The police commissioners increased the 
chief's salary from $1,200 to $1,350, one 
sergeant from $1,000 to $1,100, one 
sergeant from $924 to $1,050, four con- 
stables from $864 to $950, and one con- 
stable from $720 to $900," the Niagara 
Falls correspondent of the Gazette 
reported. "At the end of three years' service 
a constable will receive a service stripe, 
and for each additional five years an addi- 
tional stripe, each stripe entitling him to 
5 cents per day extra pay." 

The Montreal correspondent said that 
there were many more men out of work in 
the city than there had been the year 
before. "The necessity of housing the in- 
creasing number of poor and homeless men 
who are continually asking for charity has 
been brought to the attention of the Board 
of Control, and a municipal boarding house 
has been projected. 



183 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



A. H. Brown Named Chairman of Canada Labour Relations Board 



A. H. Brown, Deputy Minister of La- 
bour from 1953 to 1961 and now Director 
of the Canada Branch of the International 
Labour Office, last month was appointed 
Chairman of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board. He succeeds Hon. C. Rhodes Smith, 
QC, Chairman since 1953, who has been 
appointed a member of the Manitoba Court 
of Queen's Bench. 

Mr. Brown has been Vice-Chairman of 
the CLRB since its inception in 1948. 

A member of the Department of Labour 
for almost 18 years, Mr. Brown came to 
Ottawa in 1929 to become Secretary- 
Treasurer of and Legal Adviser to the 
Canadian Farm Loan Board. 

From 1939 to 1942 he was a member 
of the Dependents' Allowance Board, 
Department of National Defence; he was 



Chairman of the Board in 1941. During this 
period he also served as a member of the 
Dependents' Board of Trustees. 

In January 1943 he became Chief 
Executive Officer and Legal Adviser of the 
Department of Labour, and also served as 
Vice-Chairman of the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board. On April 1, 1951 he was 
appointed Assistant Deputy Minister of 
Labour. 

Mr. Brown was Canadian Government 
representative on the Governing Body of 
the International Labour Organization from 
1953 to 1956 inclusive, and was elected to 
serve as the Chairman of the Governing 
Body for the 1955-56 term- He attended 
a number of International Labour Confer- 
ences at Geneva as leader of the Canadian 
Government delegation. 



Department Prepares Purchasing Course for Small Manufacturers 



A five-session course entitled "Purchas- 
ing for Small Manufacturers" is being 
made available by the Department of La- 
bour to owners and operators of small 
manufacturing and processing firms across 
Canada. The course was "field tested" last 
fall in Etobicoke, Ont. 

The course was prepared by the Depart- 
ment's Small Business Management Train- 
ing Division of the Technical and Voca- 
tional Training Branch (L.G., Feb. p. 94), 
with the assistance of Prof. Michiel R. 
Leenders, School of Business Administra- 
tion, University of Western Ontario; a com- 
mittee of the Ottawa Chapter of the Cana- 
dian Association of Purchasing Agents; 



and Rolf S. Lockeberg, a Hull, Que., manu- 
facturer. Prof. Leenders is also educational 
adviser to the Canadian Association of 
Purchasing Agents. 

The course, prepared specifically for 
owners and operators of small manu- 
facturing and processing firms, is made 
available in local communities through 
provincial governments. Instructors are 
drawn from the ranks of business and pro- 
fessional men. 

The purposes of the course are to assist 
the owner/manager to avoid problems and 
pitfalls frequently encountered in purchas- 
ing; to save time in carrying out the pur- 
chasing task; and to save money where it 
will do the businessman the most good. 



UIC Appoints Kenneth Pankhurst to Head Economic Research Division 



Kenneth Pankhurst, former Director of 
Economic and Social Research at the Uni- 
versity College of Wales, Aberystwyth, 
Wales, was appointed last month as Chief 
of the Economic Research Division of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission. 

Mr. Pankhurst has been assigned to set 
up a research division to investigate the 
economic circumstances of the unemployed 
in Canada, and to ascertain the effects of 
unemployment insurance and the extent to 
which it is adequate. 

Born in London, England, Mr. Pank- 
hurst was graduated in 1952 from the Lon- 
don School of Economics, where he majored 
in economic history. From 1952 to 1954 he 



was a Dean Research Scholar at Leeds 
University. 

In 1954 he joined an industrial develop- 
ment council, the Cotton Board, and 
remained there as an economist until 1957, 
when he went to the National Institute of 
Economic and Social Research, London. 
There he was engaged in economic fore- 
casting, and reporting what was happen- 
ing to the British economy. 

He was appointed Director of Economic 
and Social Research at University College, 
Wales, in 1959. For the past two years he 
also acted as a consultant to Britain's 
National Economic Development Council. 



184 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



This Year's Winter Works Program 
Providing More Jobs Than 1963's 

In the number of men to be hired, and 
the number of man-days work to be pro- 
vided during the period of the program, the 
1963-64 Municipal Winter Works Incentive 
Program by February 21 had substantially 
surpassed the previous year's program on 
the corresponding date in 1963. 

This year's estimates were 136,952 men 
compared with 115,184 in 1963, and 
6,018,449 man-days compared with 
5,286,786 in 1964. At the end of the 1962- 
63 program, 145,202 men were estimated to 
have been hired during the whole period of 
the program, and 6,171,606 man-days of 
work to have been provided. 

The 6,203 applications accepted on 
February 21 this year, however, fell a little 
below the number of 6,353 accepted on the 
corresponding date in 1963. But although 
the estimated cost of projects during the 
period of the program was only slightly 
higher at $253,319,000 than the figure of 
$251,771,000 last year, the estimated direct 
payroll cost was $86,969,000 compared 
with $77,449,000 in 1963. The percentage 
of payroll cost to total cost this year was 
34.3, compared with 30.8 per cent last year. 

The number of participating local 
authorities on February 21 this year was 
2,525, and at the corresponding date last 
year it was 2,390. 

Issue Report on Drop-Out Rates 
In University Engineering Courses 

Bulletin No. 3 in the Professional Man- 
power Bulletin series presents information 
on drop-out rates in engineering courses in 
Canadian universities. The series provides 
preliminary or special statements on pro- 
fessional manpower topics. 

The report shows that the average drop- 
out rate for engineering classes graduated 
from 1954 to 1963 inclusive was 44 per 
cent. The rate increased steadily from 31 
per cent for the class of 1954 to 50 per cent 
for the classes of 1960 and 1961, then 
dropped to 46 per cent for the class of 
1963. 

For these engineering classes, 24 per cent, 
on the average, dropped out in the first 
year, 10 per cent in the second year, 6 
per cent in the third and 4 per cent in the 
final year. For five-year engineering courses, 
in order to permit comparisons with four- 
year courses, the second year was con- 
sidered the starting year. 

The statistics indicate also that the 
engineering drop-out rate was higher than 
that for certain other faculties. For the 



class of 1959, the estimated drop-out rates 
were: engineering 45 per cent, arts and 
science 41 per cent, commerce 32 per cent, 
law 29 per cent, agriculture 25 per cent, 
forestry 21 per cent, medicine 10 per cent, 
and dentistry 9 per cent. 

In addition to giving statistics on drop- 
out rates, the report presents an analysis of 
the various influences that cause students 
to drop out of university, and examines the 
relationship between the drop-out rate and 
student potential. 

Professional Manpower Bulletin No. 3, 
Drop-out Rates in University Engineering 
Courses, may be obtained without cost from 
the Economics and Research Branch, De- 
partment of Labour, Ottawa 4, Ontario. 

Canada Proceeding to Ratify 
ILO Discrimination Convention 

The Government is proceeding with the 
ratification of the Convention on Discrimi- 
nation in Employment and Occupation, 
adopted by the International Labour Con- 
ference in 1958 (L.G., 1958, p. 874). 

In announcing this in the House last 
month, Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, Minister 
of Labour, referred to the question some- 
times asked as to why the Government had 
not been able to ratify more ILO Conven- 
tions. He explained that when Conventions 
fell partly within provincial jurisdiction, the 
Government had first to reach full agree- 
ment with the provincial authorities. 

In this case, he said, the Government had 
consulted the provinces, and all had in- 
dicated that they were following a policy 
fully consistent with the objectives of the 
Convention. They had all, moreover, given 
full support and approval to the proposed 
ratification. 

Department Supplies Information 
To OECD for Survey Report 

A 290-page report, Resources of Scientific 
and Technical Personnel in the OECD Area, 
has been published by the Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development. 
The Report is based on the third inter- 
national survey on the demand for and 
supply of scientific and technical personnel- 
Canada was one of 18 OECD member 
countries who contributed information for 
the report. The Canadian contribution was 
prepared by the Economics and Research 
Branch of the Department of Labour from 
information gathered by it and by the 
Education Division of the Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics. 

Copies of the report may be obtained 
from the Queen's Printer, Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



185 



Construction Industry, Labour Join 
In Submission to Federal Cabinet 

Research is the key to full employment 
and economic prosperity, it was stated in a 
joint brief presented last month to the 
federal Cabinet by representatives of man- 
agement and labour in the construction 
industry. 

The brief was presented by a delegation 
led by J. B. Mathias and C. C. Cooper, 
chairman and secretary respectively of the 
Association of International Representatives 
of the Building and Construction Trades; 
and Donald H. Jupp, President, and S. D. 
C. Chutter, General Manager, of the Cana- 
dian Construction Association. 

Research steps so far taken by the 
Government, the delegation said, had been 
almost exclusively of a short-term nature 
or had been concerned with the supply of 
labour. They appeared to have prevented a 
further increase in unemployment, but to 
have done little so far in tackling the 
fundamental problems involved in develop- 
ing policies aimed at creating a steadily 
growing demand for labour. 

The brief went on to speak of the need 
for greater numbers of labour economists, 
and urged the Government to encourage 
the universities in their efforts to train more 
of such specialists. 

The establishment of the Economic 
Council of Canada was commended, and 
the hope was expressed that the Council 
would be able to recommend long-term 
economic policies that would maintain "full" 
employment. 

U.S. Labour, Business Advised 
To Avoid Wage and Price Rises 

Business and labour were urged to avoid 
"inflationary" wage and price increases, and 
unqualified support was given to the wage- 
price guideposts of the Kennedy Administra- 
tion, in President Johnson's first Economic 
Report to Congress. 

The President predicted a faster rate of 
economic expansion in 1964 than last year 
as a result of the early passage of the tax- 
cut bill. The faster rate of expansion would 
lower unemployment "significantly," the 
report said. 

But the favourable outlook depended on 
"swift" action by Congress on the tax 
reductions, on consumers' spending the 
extra money left in their hands, and on 
labour's and management's resisting the 
"temptation" to "exploit" the improved 
market and employment situations by 
"unneeded price boosts" and "excessive 
wage demands." 



President Johnson gave warning that he 
would not hesitate to use the powerful 
weapon of "public attention" to prevent 
inflationary price and wage increases. 
Public attention was the method used by 
the late President Kennedy in forcing the 
steel companies in 1962 to cancel increases 
they had announced in the price of steel. 

Immigration Higher in 1963 

The total number of immigrants destined 
for the labour force who arrived in Canada 
in 1963 was 45,866, compared with a total 
of 36,748 in the preceding year, according 
to the Department of Citizenship and Im- 
migration. Wives and children, and others 
not destined for the labour force, totalled 
47,285, compared with 37,838 in 1962. 
Total immigration in 1963 was thus 93,151, 
compared with 74,586 in 1962. 

In Parliament Last Month 

Speech from the Throne — A measure to 
establish minimum wages, maximum work- 
ing hours, statutory holidays and other 
labour standards for industries under federal 
jurisdiction will be introduced during the 
second session of the 26th Parliament, it 
was announced in the Speech from the 
Throne at the opening of the session on 
February 18. 

"A variety of measures which will further 
increase employment and raise the standard 
of living by strengthening and expanding 
the primary and secondary industries of 
Canada" was also forecast. 

Other legislation of interest to labour 
forecast in the Speech included: 

— Establishment of a comprehensive 
system of contributory pensions. 

— Reform of the public regulation of the 
railways so as to facilitate the adaption of 
the railway system to present and future 
needs. 

— Arrangements to allow university 
students in need of such assistance to obtain 
loans without paying interest during the 
years of study. 

— Major amendments to the National 
Housing Act. 

— Establishment of a 12-mile limit for 
the use of Canadian fisheries. 

— Measures to help in the improvement 
of farms and farm income, to strengthen 
the position of periodicals published in 
Canada, and to establish an age of retire- 
ment from the Senate. 

The Speech said the Government will 
attempt to make its full contribution to 
fostering the full employment of the Cana- 
dian people and the efficient growth of the 
economy. 



186 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



Pension Plans in Canadian Industry 



Survey finds 72 per cent of non-office and 88 per cent of 
office employees surveyed were in plants with a pension plan 



A substantial number of employees in 
Canadian industry work in establishments 
that have some kind of pension plan. 

The annual survey of working conditions 
conducted each May by the Economics and 
Research Branch, Department of Labour, 
a report on which has just been released 
(see box), found that of the 1,541,163 non- 
office employees in the May 1963 survey, 
72 per cent were in establishments reporting 
a pension plan; of the 681,658 office em- 
ployees, 88 per cent were in establishments 
with a pension plan. 

Eighteen per cent of the non-office em- 
ployees covered by the survey did not have 
to contribute to the pension plan in their 
establishments; 54 per cent were in estab- 
lishments with contributory plans. 

In Ontario, a higher proportion of em- 
ployees than in any other province were 
in plants where the employer pays the 
whole cost of the pension plan. Of the total 
non-office employees in Ontario covered by 
the survey, 27 per cent were in plants with 
a non-contributory plan; of office em- 
ployees, 15 per cent. 

A tabulation, by province, of the survey 
returns relating to pension plans, for office 
and non-office employees, appears on page 
189. 

Non-Office Employees 

By Province. An analysis by province 
shows that Saskatchewan had the highest 
proportion — 82 per cent — of non-office em- 
ployees in plants where a plan was in 
effect; Manitoba came next with 77 per 
cent, and Ontario third with 76. New- 



foundland, with 60 per cent, had the small- 
est proportion. Quebec had 65 per cent. 

Regarding the contributory type of plan, 
in which the cost is shared by employer 
and employees, the proportion of the non- 
office employees in the survey who actually 
participated in such a plan was 36 per 
cent.* 

By provinces, Saskatchewan again led 
in the proportion of non-office employees 
actually participating in contributory pen- 
sion plans, with 61 per cent. Manitoba was 
second with 48 per cent, and New Bruns- 
wick came third with 46 per cent. Quebec 
had 36 per cent and Ontario 32 per cent. 

But Ontario led in the proportion of 
employees in reporting units t with a non- 
contributory plan. Of the Ontario non- 
office employees covered by the survey, 27 
per cent were in such plants; 49 per cent 
were in establishments with a contributory 
plan. In Saskatchewan, the percentages were 
4 and 78; in Manitoba, 6 and 71; and in 
Quebec, 13 and 52, respectively. 

Taking the country as a whole, the most 
common period of service required to be- 
come eligible to participate in a contributory 
plan was one year; 14 per cent of total 



* Owing to service requirements, not all employees 
in an establishment where a pension plan is in 
force are eligible to benefit by the plan. 

t The term "reporting unit" refers to an operating 
unit having an independent existence in the sense 
that it contains within itself all of the elements 
needed for the activities carried on. Thus the re- 
porting unit is typically a factory, mine, store or 
similar unit; although in most cases it is a sep- 
arate firm, it should be noted that the term 
"reporting unit" is not necessarily synonymous with 
"firm" or "company". 



Working Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1963 has just been issued by the 
Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour. The 220-page report 
contains information on such working conditions as the standard work week, 
vacations with pay, paid statutory holidays, pension plans, group life insurance, 
sickness and accident leave benefits, educational assistance and the proportion of 
employees covered by collective agreements. 

The report is divided into two parts, one for non-office and one for office 
employees. Both parts are presented on an area basis and an industrial basis. For 
Canada and each of the provinces the information refers to the total industrial 
composite. In addition, data are presented for some 40 individual industrial divisions 
on a Canada basis. 

The report presents information obtained in the Department's annual survey of 
working conditions conducted at May 1, 1963. The survey covered some 20,000 
employers with a total of 2,222,821 employees, 1,541,163 non-office employees and 
681,658 office employees. 

The bilingual report is available from the Queen's Printer (Catalogue 
No. L2-1563) at 35 cents a copy. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



187 



non-office employees needed this length of 
service. The next most common period was 
three months or less (percentage of em- 
ployees, 12). Only 1 per cent of the em- 
ployees were in plants where the qualifying 
period was more than five years. 

By Industry. Particulars of survey cover- 
age are based on a wide range of non- 
agricultural industries, including 8,494 
establishments in manufacturing, with 
853,647 non-office employees. Forestry, con- 
struction, water transportation and govern- 
ment service (except municipal works de- 
partments) are not covered. 

In manufacturing, the percentage of the 
total number of non-office workers in the 
survey who were employed in plants where 
a pension plan was in effect was 69 per 
cent, made up of 23 per cent under a non- 
contributory and 46 per cent under a con- 
tributory plan. Of the total number of em- 
ployees in all establishments reporting a 
pension plan, 28 per cent actually partici- 
pated in a contributory plan. 

The most common length of service re- 
quired for participation in a contributory 
pension plan, as shown by the number of 
employees in the units reporting as a per- 
centage of the total number of employees 
in the survey, was one year (15 per cent), 
with two years the next most common (11 
per cent). 

The percentage of the total employees 
in establishments in the manufacturing in- 
dustry that reported a pension plan ranged 
from 20 per cent in Sash and Doors to 
100 per cent in Tires and Tubes. All the 
employees in the latter industry were under 
a non-contributory plan. 

Office Employees 

By Province. As was the case with non- 
office workers, Saskatchewan was the prov- 
ince with the highest percentage of office 
employees in establishments where a pen- 
sion plan was in force, viz., 93 per cent. 
Manitoba was second with 91 per cent, and 
Alberta third with 90 per cent. Ontario 
had 89 per cent and Quebec 86. Newfound- 
land, with 76 per cent, had the lowest pro- 
portion. 

Among establishments that had a pension 
plan, the country-wide proportion of 88 
per cent was made up of 13 per cent in 
establishments where the employers paid 
the whole cost of the plan and 75 per cent 
in those where the cost was shared by em- 
ployers and employees. 

In Saskatchewan, only 4 per cent of the 
employees were in establishments where the 
employer pays the whole cost, and 89 per 



cent in plants where the employee contrib- 
utes. In Manitoba, the percentages were 5 
and 86, and in Alberta, 5 and 85. In 
Ontario, 15 per cent were in establishments 
where the plan was non-contributory; 74 
per cent, where the plan was contributory. 
In Quebec, the percentages were 14 and 72. 

As a proportion of the total number of 
681,658 office employees, those who were 
participants where a contributory plan 
existed amounted to 65 per cent in Saskat- 
chewan, 58 per cent in Alberta, 57 per 
cent in Manitoba, 47 per cent in Quebec 
and Ontario, and 49 per cent in the whole 
country. The lowest percentage was 46 in 
Newfoundland. 

Apart from the generally higher pro- 
portion of office employees who were in 
establishments where a pension plan was in. 
effect, the most conspicuous difference 
between office and non-office employees 
was in the proportion employed in estab- 
lishments where a non-contributory plan 
was in effect: 1 3 per cent of office employees, 
and 18 per cent of non-office employees. 

In five provinces, the percentages for 
establishments where the plan was non- 
contributory were 5 per cent or less. The 
provinces in which the non-contributory per- 
centages were highest were Ontario (15 
per cent) and Quebec (14 per cent). 

In Canada as a whole, three months or 
less was the most common qualifying period 
under contributory plans (24 per cent of 
employees), and one year was the next 
most common (23 per cent). 

By Industry. The survey of office em- 
ployees in manufacturing, covering a total 
of 263,814 workers in 8,213 reporting units, 
showed an aggregate of 85 per cent of the 
employees in the survey were in reporting 
units covered by a pension plan. This per- 
centage was made up of 17 per cent in units 
with a non-contributory, and 68 per cent 
with a contributory plan. Employees 
actually participating in a contributory plan 
amounted to 46 per cent of the total. 

The most common length of service re- 
quired to qualify for participation in a 
contributory plan was one year (in plants 
with 27 per cent of the total employees), 
and the second most common period was 
two years (14 per cent). 

The percentages for the various industries 
were similar to those for the non-office em- 
ployees, except that all percentages were 
higher. The percentages of employees in 
units reporting a pension plan in the various 
industries ranged from 36 in Sash and 
Doors to 100 in Tires and Tubes. 



188 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 





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*Jco^»<T-ieMco-^»o S 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

74338-5— a 



• MARCH 1964 



189 



46th Annual Meeting of the 

Canadian Construction Association 

Committees report progress in labour-management relations, 
new approaches to apprenticeship training. Support is urged 
for Labour College of Canada and for study of welfare plans 



Progress in labour-management relations 
and new approaches to apprenticeship train- 
ing were reported to delegates attending the 
46th annual meeting of the Canadian Con- 
struction Association, held in Toronto on 
February 2-5. Reports by the Labour 
Relations Committee and the Apprentice- 
ship Training Committee were among those 
given by 13 standing committees of the 
Association. More than 900 delegates and 
guests attended. 

Among recommendations of the Labour 
Relations Committee were that "sympa- 
thetic and if possible material support be 
given to the Labour College of Canada" 
and that Association affiliates carry out a 
careful study of welfare plans. The 
Apprenticeship Training Committee pro- 
posed the indenturing of apprentices to 
"Joint Committees" and recommended pre- 
employment training among its proposals. 

William Ladyman of Toronto, Vice-Presi- 
dent, International Brotherhood of Electri- 
cal Workers, speaking on "Multi-Trade Bar- 
gaining and Provincial Agreements," told 
delegates that from the union's point of 
view, multi-trade-union bargaining has 
many disadvantages, but that the craft 
unions in Canada are favourably inclined 
to agree with multiple-employer bargaining. 
Such approach, however, could not be 
developed overnight, he added. 

T. C. Higginson, President, Engineering 
Institute of Canada, Saint John, N.B., speak- 
ing on the ties between the EIC and the 
CCA, emphasized the increasing importance 
of education. 

Dr. J. A. Corry, Principal, Queen's Uni- 
versity, Kingston, Ont., spoke on "The 
Nation and the Universities," and M. L. 
Baxter of M. L. Baxter Ltd., Toronto, 
addressed the delegates on university educa- 
tion for the construction industry, and 
described the curriculum of an industrial 
engineering course at the Nova Scotia 
Technical College, especially the option 
dealing with construction methods and 
materials. 

Delegates approved changes in some 14 
standing resolutions expressive of CCA 
policy and added two new ones. Among the 
total of 25 resolutions were recommenda- 
tions that: 



— Provincial Governments should intro- 
duce and enforce compulsory tradesmen's 
qualification legislation for the construction 
industry. 

— Labour legislation should be revised by 
the federal Government, and by provincial 
Governments that have not yet done so, 
"to provide for conditions governing the 
construction industry." 

— Wherever practicable, materials and 
equipment marked "Canadian-made" should 
be specified for construction by all con- 
cerned. 

— Federal and provincial Governments 
should develop more effective incentive 
policies in order to encourage economic 
growth. 

In the address by their President, dele- 
gates heard the federal Government criti- 
cized for its sales tax on many construction 
materials and equipment previously 
exempted. This could jeopardize the record 
capital expenditures that had been forecast 
for this year, he told them. 

The Association elected Donald H. Jupp 
of Toronto as President for 1964, to suc- 
ceed T. A. Somerville. Mr. Jupp is 
President, Pilkington Brothers (Canada) 
Ltd. 

President's Address 

In his address to the meeting, outgoing 
President T. A. Somerville said the con- 
struction industry had completed a record 
program in 1963 — with a value in excess of 
$7,600,000,000 He criticized the federal 
Government for its sales tax on many con- 
struction materials and equipment, saying 
it may affect the record capital expendi- 
tures projected for this year. 

He was concerned about the future; some 
of the problems the industry and the 
country faced were: greater government 
control accompanied by increased spending 
and higher taxes, too much construction 
work being performed by government forces 
and forces of government agencies and com- 
missions, and smaller profits ahead and 
more and larger bankruptcies. He also saw 
"greater and often irresponsible demands 
from labour," and lower standards of work- 
manship. 



190 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



Mr. Somerville criticized the application 
of the federal sales tax to many construc- 
tion materials and equipment previously 
exempted. "This federal sales tax policy 
was completely unexpected and at variance 
with stated government policy objectives 
designed to increase the rate of economic 
development, and is working against the 
efforts of some ministries endeavouring to 
expand trade," he asserted. He added that 
the record capital expenditure program for 
1964 may be jeopardized by this sales tax. 

He also criticized on several grounds the 
construction carried out by government 
departments or agencies in competition with 
private industry. They were exempt from 
many taxes, and could not deal with the 
problems of the changing conditions in 
the industry the way the construction 
industry could. 

Referring to profits, he said that between 
1951 and 1961, corporate sales increased 
98 per cent but profits after taxes increased 
only by 4.3 per cent. Many concerns operat- 
ing at too low a profit had disappeared, he 
pointed out. 

He said there was an increasing amount 
of irresponsible competition within the in- 
dustry; some operators declared one 
bankruptcy after another, he asserted, stat- 
ing that our laws "are disgracefully lack- 
ing in this regard." 

Another worry of the industry was the 
lower standard of workmanship, the 
President said. Everybody demanded excel- 
lence from everyone else, but it was neces- 
sary for all in the industry to live up to 
their responsibilities, he stressed. 

Committee Reports 

Labour Relations Committee — The La- 
bour Relations Committee, among other 
recommendations in its report to the meet- 
ing, proposed that "sympathetic and if pos- 
sible material support be given to the 
Labour College of Canada"; that under- 
taking closer contact with labour groups 
would result in a better understanding of 
problems, which in turn would create a 
mutual respect and provide more stable 
relations; and that affiliates carry out a 
careful study of welfare plans. 

As to welfare and education assistance 
plans, the committee held up the Montreal 
district as a good example to follow. The 
1964 budget for the Montreal construction 
industry included $600,000 in apprentice- 
ship grants and $5,000 in scholarships for 
university courses. 

The committee also pointed out its 
success in paving the way in Canada for 
joint (labour-management) presentations 
to governments. Three such briefs had been 
presented. 



Support of research in construction la- 
bour relations had started to produce results, 
the committee reported. Part I of the first 
of three studies was published last Novem- 
ber under the auspices of the National 
Research Council. It is entitled: "Manpower 
Utilization in the Canadian Construction 
Industry," and represents essential pre- 
requisites for Part II, which deals with 
economic hours of work and work weeks, 
and which the committee expected would 
be published soon by the University of 
British Columbia. 

In addition, the CCA has co-operated 
closely with the author of a McGill Uni- 
versity PhD. study on the "Effects of the 
Quebec Collective Agreement Act in the 
Province's Construction Industry from 1935 
to 1960." It is to be published this year, in 
English by McGill and in French by Laval 
University. 

The committee reported also that Peter 
Stevens, the Association's Director of La- 
bour Relations, had spent several weeks in 
Western Europe last summer to research 
construction labour relations in West 
Germany, Sweden, Belgium, France and 
the United Kingdom. 

In addition, it reported that one-day 
locally conducted seminars at the invita- 
tion of affiliates took place at 22 centres 
and were attended by more than 500 con- 
struction executives. The offer is being 
repeated this year. 

Apprenticeship Training Committee — 
Reporting on its activity for 1963, the 
Apprenticeship Training Committee offered 
the conclusions that: 

1. The indenturing of apprentices to "Joint 
Committees" could help to create more employ- 
ment opportunities for apprentices. 

2. Compulsory tradesmen's qualification 
legislation is a highly desirable prerequisite for 
the required increased employment of in- 
dentured apprentices. 

3. Financial incentives would likely en- 
courage construction employers to employ 
greater numbers of indentured apprentices. 

4. Pre-employment training of apprentices 
is highly desirable. 

5. More publicity, guidance and counselling 
on the advantages of apprenticeship training 
in the construction industry are essential. 

6. Care should be taken to attend to the 
need to up-grade the existing construction 
labour force before adding additional helpers 
to it through training programs for the 
unemployed. 

Reviewing its work and developments 
during the past year, the committee pointed 
out that the Association had decided to 
accelerate its activities to promote apprentice- 
ship training after having concluded that 
employment opportunity, increased produc- 
tion, and improved workmanship were 
becoming more and more dependent on the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 

74338-5— 21 



191 



education and trade training of the Canadian 
labour force. As a result, a nationally 
representative committee was appointed. It 
held three meetings during the year and 
issued four "Training Topics" bulletins, 
including two on recent apprenticeship and 
trade training developments in Western 
Europe. 

Particular attention was paid to the 
development of supervisory training. 



Assisted by the federal Department of 
Labour's Technical and Vocational Train- 
ing Branch, a small CCA advisory com- 
mittee had started to define and analyse 
the job of "construction superintendent." 
When completed this summer, this analysis 
will be made available to local advisory 
committees of affiliates for developing, in 
conjunction with their provincial or local 
education authorities, a syllabus suited to 
their needs. 



Multi-Trade Bargaining and Provincial Agreements 

Address by William Lady man, I.B.E.W., to CCA Annual Meeting 



From the union's point of view, "there 
seems to be little disadvantage to multi- 
employer bargaining" but multi-trade-union 
bargaining has numerous disadvantages, 
especially in the more highly skilled crafts, 
William Ladyman of Toronto, Vice- 
President, International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers, told the annual meeting 
of the Canadian Construction Association 
in an address on "Multi-Trade Bargaining 
and Provincial Agreements." 

"There is a very real fear that the wage 
differentials between the trades will be 
reduced to the benefit of the less-skilled 
and less-highly paid craftsmen," he added. 

Multiple bargaining is an involved con- 
cept, Mr. Ladyman said. His union has 
agreements that cover as many as four states 
in the United States. These agreements are 
between a number of employers, represented 
by an employers' association, and more than 
one local union. He stressed that the em- 
ployers are specialized contractors, for the 
most part employing only electricians, and 
that the unions are all locals of the same 
international union representing only one 
craft. He continued: 

These two points are extremely important, 
since the concept of multi-employer and multi- 
trade bargaining expressed in the Goldenberg 
Commission's Report |"L.G. 1962, p. 7781 
deals with a much broader form of agreement. 
The multi-employer form of bargaining in 
Canada takes on a different form from that in 
the United States because of the wider use of 
general contractors. By this we mean con- 
tractors who bargain with a number of trade 
unions rather than one trade. 

Eventually, multi-trade bargaining could 
create an industrial type of union in each 
bargaining situation, with the submersion 
of the crafts as has been found in the 
United States upon the emergence of 
District 50 of the United Mine Workers in 
the construction field, he said. "I would be 
less than honest with you, gentlemen, if 
I were to suggest the trade unions in Canada 



are about to accept this concept at this time 
or in the foreseeable future," he declared. 
And on multiple-employer bargaining 
the speaker explained his views thus: 

... I will say this, the craft unions in 
Canada are very favourably inclined to agree 
with the idea of multiple bargaining. The 
entire question is being considered very care- 
fully by the different organizations and I 
have no doubt that in the years to come, some 
workable arrangement will be devised. If it is 
good for the industry it will be done, but it is 
not going to be accomplished overnight, and 
it must be done on the basis of Canadian 
conditions. 

There are actually many forms of mul- 
tiple bargaining in Canada today, he 
asserted. The railway industry provides one 
example of what his union does not want 
in the construction trades — to have all 
mechanical tradesmen grouped in one 
classification, known as Mechanic, with the 
same wage rate and same conditions. He 
pointed out this had caused much resent- 
ment, as the identity of a craft was lost, and 
it had two other bad effects: difficulty in 
getting competent tradesmen and in hold- 
ing apprentices in railway service once they 
finish their training. 

As a completely different example of 
multiple bargaining in Canada the speaker 
listed the Allied Construction Council serv- 
ing the construction workers employed by 
the Ontario-Hydro-Electric Commission. 
Here most of the railways' disadvantages 
from labour's standpoint are absent. The 
Pine Point Project in the Northwest Ter- 
ritories is also a good example- 

The speaker asserted that it was a fallacy 
to approach multiple bargaining on the 
basis of equalization of working conditions, 
reducing higher rates to improve the lower 
ones, and so on, as this "very effectively 
will destroy the concept of multiple bar- 
gaining before it begins," Craftsmen are 
proud of their trade and their history, and 
do not want to sacrifice the gains they have 
made for this form of bargaining, he said. 



192 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



As to bargaining on a province-wide 
basis, an important consideration is the 
independent character of local unions. The 
International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers has 18 local union areas in Ontario, 
he emphasized, and if a province-wide 
negotiating team were to be formed, all of 
them would want some representation on 
it. "Multiply this by all building trades 



unions and I am sure you will agree 
negotiations could be very difficult." 

Mr. Ladym an believed that most officers 
of building trades unions saw merit in 
provincial agreements, but union constitu- 
tions differ and memberships must be con- 
vinced of their value. In addition, he pointed 
out that the contractors themselves would 
have to be convinced, and that all these 
things would take time. 



OFL Education Conference 



Speakers advise union movement to be flexible and receptive 
to change, to subordinate own interests to welfare of society 



Tradition, past practice and history may 
act as a dead weight on the labour move- 
ment unless the trade unions recognize the 
need for flexibility in a period of rapid 
change, Gower Markel, Education Director 
of the United Steelworkers, told an educa- 
tion conference in Niagara Falls last month 
sponsored by the Ontario Federation of 
Labour. 

The labour movement, like other institu- 
tions, he said, must be flexible and receptive 
to change under the pressure of new 
developments. The problem was how to 
bridge the gap between the past and the 
present and future. 

William Smith, President of the Cana- 
dian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and 
General Workers, another speaker, said 
unions should start today on the path to 
subordinating their own interests to the 
welfare of society as a whole. He remarked 
that this was what they would have to do if 
they ever succeeded in building a political 
party that attained power on the strength 
of its promise to establish an equitable 
society. 

Mr. Smith thought that unions should not 
reduce political pressure for desirable social 
legislation in favour of economic pressure 
at the bargaining table for welfare measures 
that would benefit union members only. 

A similar view was expressed by Dr. 
John Rich, a Toronto psychiatrist and 
lecturer, when he said that the important 
question for unions to ask themselves was 
not what unions could best achieve for their 
members, but what was the best sort of 
society they could help to establish, "and 
then throw their full weight behind the 
necessary political and legislative changes." 

Dr. Rich argued that trade unionists 
should be prepared to challenge the in- 
dividualistic attitude in society. Corporations 
were not restricted in any move they made 



toward specialization, but they accepted no 
obligation to retrain or replace workers 
who were thus made redundant, he said. 

Although society demanded a high degree 
of skill, free education was provided for 
only a very limited range of persons. "Hav- 
ing made it impossible for the man who 
suffers from a low intelligence, or from 
skills which are no longer required, to gain 
an adequate income, we resentfully give him 
a minimum amount of welfare possible and 
blame him for being lazy," Dr. Rich 
asserted. 

Automation 

With reference to automation, Giles 
Endicott, Research Director of the United 
Packinghouse Workers, said: "Automation 
requires that we change the basic concept 
of no-work-no-pay. Seditious as it may 
seem, and however counter to Calvinistic 
ethics, we must accept the principle of 
income unrelated to work." Although 
shorter work weeks without loss of take- 
home pay have become an accepted form 
of income without work, he said, he pro- 
posed pay for "non-work" at the plant or 
community centre. 

Company directors should be elected by 
employees as well as by shareholders, said 
Dr. Donald J. Clough, Secretary of the 
Ontario Foundation of Automation and 
Employment. He suggested that such joint 
elections would change the master-servant 
relationship and bridge the ever-present 
gap between management and labour. Say- 
ing that what he was advocating was "a 
rather drastic adjustment of the capitalist 
philosophy," he argued that corporate enter- 
prise was one of the few undemocratic 
institutions remaining in the western world. 

He suggested that in their bargaining, 
public relations and political activities, 
unions could aim at the achievement of true 
industrial democracy. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



193 



Industrial Safety 

R. G. D. Anderson, General Manager of 
the Industrial Accident Prevention Associa- 
tions, Toronto, said that instead of encour- 
aging union members to listen to the advice 
of employer-sponsored safety associations, 
unions had been "screaming from the side- 
lines" about not being represented on the 
Association's boards. He said that, except 
for executive committee and board meet- 
ings, IAPA meetings were open to the 
public. "Why haven't you taken advantage 
of these meetings?" he said. 

Jack Cauley, Vice-Chairman of the 
Ontario Workmen's Compensation Board, 
said that some employers kept injured 
workers at full pay and then found an 
excuse to lay them off. This meant that 
the company's record of compensatable 
accidents was better than it otherwise would 
have been, and that its rate of assessment 
for workmen's compensation did not go up. 

Organized labour had a commendable 
social record in fighting for national or 
provincial medical care plans, improved 
housing for low income groups, and for 
a contributory national plan, but it had 
done little to open the doors of the labour 
force for the handicapped, said David 
Archer, President of the OFL. The unions 
ought to consider revising seniority pro- 
cedures to conform to conditions imposed 
by automation and relocation of plants, he 
contended. 

"Disemployment Fund" 

"Automation is inevitable . . . Yet such 
progress means fewer jobs," said M. J. 
Fenwick, an OFL vice-president and 



Assistant to the Director of District 6 of 
the United Steelworkers. "Automation 
threatens our traditional work-for-pay 
relationship. A new means of distributing 
purchasing power must be found." 

The speaker suggested that employers 
who introduced automation should be made 
to pay an automation disemployment tax, 
which would be used to form a fund that 
could be drawn on to help pay full wages 
to employees laid off work. "Permanent 
or temporary loss of jobs due to automa- 
tion should be treated as a major industrial 
and occupational injury, and should be com- 
pensated accordingly by full wages for the 
full period of disemployment," he said. 

Mr. Fenwick disagreed with the "mis- 
placed impartiality" with which "we provide 
equal welfare benefits for the poor and 
the rich, despite the wide economic im- 
balance between the two groups." He 
argued that social security payments should 
be confined to Canadians earning up to 
$6,000 a year, and those earning more 
should "pay their own way." 

Among other proposals by Mr. Fenwick 
were: 

— A plan to "build the nation" through 
an economic development plan. 

— A manpower development agency that 
"would be charged with job placement 
authority, training and retraining manpower, 
research need for new jobs and developing 
new skills." 

"The general public too must be re- 
educated to accept the proposition that 
vocational and technical education is not 
demeaning and does not represent a down- 
grading in social status," he said. 



Second Nova Scotia Labour-Management Study Conference 



Two recommendations regarding amend- 
ments to the Nova Scotia Trade Union Act 
made at the second Joint Labour-Manage- 
ment Study Conference at Dalhousie Uni- 
versity in November (L.G., Dec. 1963, p. 
1069) dealt with unfair labour practices and 
with voluntary conciliation boards. 

The recommendation concerning unfair 
labour practices proposed that jurisdiction 
in such cases should be transferred from 
the courts to the Labour Relations Board. 
The Board would inquire into an alleged 
violation, and if unable to settle it, would 
issue an order; such an order would be 
filed with the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia 
and would become enforceable as an order 
of the court. 

The recommendation regarding volun- 
tary conciliation boards proposed that con- 



ciliation boards should be appointed only 
if requested by both parties to a dispute. If 
both parties applied for a board, the 
Minister would be obliged to appoint one, 
but otherwise no board would be appointed. 
The Minister would cease to have the 
discretionary power he now has in the 
appointment of boards. 

The recommendation that would increase 
from seven to twenty-one days the period 
that must elapse before a strike or lockout 
may be called would apply only in cases 
where a conciliation board was not ap- 
pointed. When a board was appointed, the 
period would remain seven days after 
receipt of a conciliation board report. The 
December Labour Gazette, in describing 
this proposed amendment, did not make 
this distinction clear. 



194 



Tiff LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



Trustees Plan to Establish Advisory Council of Seamen 



The Board of Trustees of the Maritime 
Transportation Unions has issued two 
directives, one calling on the five unions 
under trusteeship to nominate members 
from which an advisory council of seamen 
will be established, the second telling the 
unions they are to keep the trustees in- 
formed on all developments leading to con- 
tract signing. 

Until now, the five unions have bargained 
on their own. Under the new system, the 
unions will continue to formulate their 
demands but will require trustee authority 
before signing any contract. 

Representation has been requested from 
the various unions on the basis of union 
strength. The trustees will then select from 
this delegation the members who will form 
the seamen's advisory council. 

The seamen's council is designed, among 
other things, to create a more uniform 
approach to the problems of the industry 
and to the relationship between seamen — 
Great Lakes and coastal — on the one hand 
and management on the other. 

In January, at the request of the Board 
of Trustees, a comparable body representing 
management met with the trustees. It was 
the largest and most representative delega- 
tion by ship management in Canada since 
the early 1930's. 

The major contracts currently in force 
between management and the Seafarers' 
International Union and the Canadian Mari- 
time Union, representing unlicensed deck 
and engineroom crews, terminate at the end 
of May. 

The SIU, largest of the five unions under 
trustee management and control, has in- 
formed the trustees that 42 contracts could 
be opened this spring but that no decision 
to do so has yet been reached. 



The directive concerning the seamen's 
council quotes the trustees' belief that the 
time has come when such a council to 
represent the unions in the industry could 
be most helpful to the trustees and to the 
unions' membership. 

"You are requested to nominate mem- 
bers and submit their names to us without 
delay," the directive said. "Though frequent 
meetings of the council may not be neces- 
sary, such meetings are likely to be better 
attended if nominations are generally con- 
fined to the Great Lakes and Upper St. 
Lawrence-Quebec City area." 

The second directive suggests that, where 
appropriate, "each union will give notice 
of 'agreement opening', prepare its program 
of negotiations and objectives and fulfil its 
collective bargaining procedures in the 
normal fashion. 

"Copies of all notices and other docu- 
ments prepared for these purposes are to be 
forwarded to the trustees on the date of 
preparation or issue. But no agreement is 
to be finally concluded and signed before 
it has been approved by the trustees." 
Furthermore: 

"In order to provide sound advice, the 
trustees will need to be represented in 
many negotiations and should, therefore, be 
kept informed as to the place of meeting 
and progress with the management bodies 
directly concerned." 

Trustee Judge Rene Lippe explained the 
steps are part of the over-all role of the 
trustees to restore democratic order in the 
nation's shipping industry. The manner of 
the action also is designed to follow the 
principle established by the trustees at the 
outset of their assignment: to interfere as 
little as is necessary in the day-to-day func- 
tions of the unions, he said. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



195 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Handicapped Businessmen Successful 

Two Nova Scotia paraplegics succeed with bookbinding shop 
staffed by other handicapped, have now opened another branch 



Ten years ago, two Montreal men, 
paraplegics as a result of war injuries, 
decided to settle in Port Joli, N.S., about 
14 miles from Liverpool. This decision was 
to have far-reaching effects for the handi- 
capped of the province and resulted in con- 
siderable savings for the Nova Scotia 
Government. 

The two men, Charles Kelsey and 
George Whalley, about a year ago opened 
a bookbinding shop in an inconspicuous 
building next to a lumber yard in Liver- 
pool. They started with three employees, all 
handicapped persons. The business expanded 
rapidly, until 12 persons were on the pay- 
roll in the Liverpool shop. A branch was 
opened in New Glasgow, where another 12 
handicapped persons are employed. 

Messrs. Kelsey and Whalley hope to ex- 
pand to New Brunswick soon and have 
made inquiries in other areas with a view 
to further development. 

Before opening the shop, the partners had 
obtained a concession from the provincial 
Department of Education to repair school 
text books, which, up to that time, had 
been thrown out. The Department estimates 
that rebinding prolongs the life of each text 
book at least two years. 

With normal use, a hard-cover book will 
last for three or four years, and the cost 
of rebinding is considerably less than the 
cost of replacement. Both Department 
officials and school inspectors are extremely 
pleased with the work being done by K and 
W Enterprises, as the firm is called. 

Although repair and binding of school 
texts constitute the bulk of work done by 
the shop, its services are being used by an 
increasing number of private concerns. 

"This is no welfare organization," says 
Mr. Whalley. "We treat our employees like 
anyone else and we expect the same kind of 
treatment. There are no concessions, and if 
an employee doesn't measure up, he is 
fired." 

Each person is placed on a two-week 
probation period at the beginning of em- 
ployment, and if, at the end of that time, 
both employee and employer are satisfied, 
the person stays. This two-week trial period 
is essential, because many of the new em- 
ployees have never worked before, and a 
period of assessment and adjustment is 
necessary. Included on the payroll are a 



number of paraplegics, arthritics, retarded 
persons, polio cases, amputees, arrested 
tuberculosis cases, and others. They range 
in age from 19 to 57 years. 

The staff works a full eight-hour day. 
The starting wage is 75 cents an hour, with 
a raise of 10 cents an hour at the end of 
three months, and a bonus arrangement 
based on total shop production. 

In a sense, the shops of K and W Enter- 
prises are training centres, as it is the aim of 
the managers to train workers qualified to 
compete for employment as book binders 
in any firm of this type. It was one of the 
first workers trained at the Liverpool shop 
who was placed as foreman when the branch 
was opened in New Glasgow. 

A Successful Manitoba Placement 

Rosaire Dufault, stricken with polio in 
his early teens and now confined to a wheel- 
chair, is the first handicapped employee that 
Allied Farm Equipment, Ltd., has taken on 
its staff. Through efforts of a placement 
officer of the Society for Crippled Children 
and Adults of Manitoba, the accredited 
provincial government rehabilitation agency, 
Mr. Dufault secured a job with the firm 
as a Telex operator and stock record clerk 
in January 1963. 

During his year of service, he has had two 
raises, and the management is so pleased 
with his work that four more handicapped 
persons have been added to the staff. 

Other handicapped workers serving ef- 
ficiently with the firm include a clerk-typist. 
A young man has been hired as inventory 
clerk by the associate firm of Alco Equip- 
ment, Ltd. The company as a whole is now 
considering the practicability of employing 
handicapped men and women. 

Mr. Dufault had been placed in the 
workshop of the Society for Crippled 
Children and Adults of Manitoba and there 
received training in various phases of office 
routine and was given the opportunity to 
perfect his typing skill. 

"He is very efficient," says the manager. 
"We had an unusually busy summer in 1963 
and he worked early and late. He is cheerful 
and obliging and is well liked by his fel- 
low workers." 

Last spring, Mr. Dufault bought a car, 
specially fitted for him to operate, and is 
now able to drive himself to and from 
work. 



196 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



Latest Labour Statistics 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000. 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 

New Residential Construction (b) 

Starts 

Completions 

Under construction 



February 
February 
February 
February 
February 

February 
February 
February 

February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 

February 
February 

December 
December 

Yr. 1963 
Yr. 1963 



February 
February 
February 



December 
December 
December 
December 
February 

December 
December 



January 
January 
January 
January 



February 
February 
February 



6,690 
6,223 
570 
5,653 
5,130 

5,279 
763 
181 

467 

73 

176 

115 

56 

47 

438 
29 

125.4 
116.0 

93,151 
45,866 



46 

7,957 

82, 140 



$81.77 

$ 2.01 

38.1 

$76.77 

134.5 

137.1 
1,842 



202.2 
174.1 
181.4 
167.8 



6,015 

8,029 

78,915 



0.1 
0.1 
0.5 
0.1 
0.2 

0.1 
3.3 

7.7 

0.2 
1.4 
1.7 
4.2 
3.7 
0.0 



+ 2.3 
-23.7 



- 2 

- 2, 



+253.8 
+353.1 
+278.0 



- 3.4 
+ 1.5 

- 8.2 

- 6.3 

- 0.2 



6.2 
2.2 



+ 1.0 

- 0.2 
+ 1.6 

- 1.9 



-27.6 

+28.7 
- 2.7 



3.0 
4.6 
7.1 
4.3 
3.8 



+ 3.4 
+11.7 
+ 9.7 

-14.3 
-16.1 
-12.0 
-14.8 
-21.1 



-14.5 
-12.1 

+ 4.3 
+ 4.6 

+24.9 
+24.8 



+24.3 
+13.6 
+ 9.1 



4.2 
3.6 
2.1 
6.1 
1.8 

4.4 

8.8 



+10.4 
+ 9.6 
+11.0 
+ 8.3 



+56.0 
+24.9 
+41.4 



(a) Estimates of the labour force, the employed and the unemployed, are from The Labour Force, 
a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics which also contains additional details of 
the characteristics of the labour force, together with definitions and explanatory notes. 

(b) Centres of 5,000 population or more. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



197 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 



Employment and Unemployment, February 



An estimated 6,223,000 persons were 
employed and 467,000 were unemployed in 
February, virtually the same as in January. 
During this period in previous years, em- 
ployment has usually declined somewhat 
and unemployment has tended to rise. 

Employment was up 272,000, or 4.6 per 
cent, from a year earlier, and unemploy- 
ment was down 78,000. The labour force 
at 6,690,000 was 194,000, or 3.0 per cent, 
higher than in February 1963. 

Unemployment in February represented 
7.0 per cent of the labour force, compared 
with 8.4 per cent in February 1963 and 9.1 
per cent in February 1962. In January the 
unemployment rate was 7.0 per cent. 

Seasonally adjusted, the February 
unemployment rate was 4.7 per cent, down 
from 4.9 per cent in January and 5.7 in 
February 1963. 

Employment 

Between mid-January and mid-February, 
employment was well maintained in con- 
struction, forestry, transportation and agri- 
culture. All these industries usually experi- 
ence declines during this period. 

The construction industry in particular 
registered a smaller-than-seasonal decrease, 
aided in part by unusually mild weather in 
most parts of the country. Stimulated by 
the government incentive program for win- 
ter house building, activity in residential 
construction remained at a very high level. 



Compared with a year earlier, non-farm 
employment was up 234,000. The largest 
increases occurred in service, manufacturing 
and trade. Agricultural employment was 
38,000 higher than in February 1963; most 
of the increase was in the Prairie Provinces. 

The number of women employed in- 
creased by 138,000, or 8.2 per cent, over the 
year; almost three quarters of the increase 
was among married women. The number 
of employed men was higher by 134,000, 
or 3.1 per cent, from the total a year earlier; 
married men accounted for nearly two- 
thirds of the increase. 

Employment was considerably higher 
than a year ago in all regions, except in 
the Atlantic region, where it showed little 
change. Particularly large gains, amounting 
to 6.4 per cent and 6.1 per cent respectively, 
took place in Quebec and British Columbia. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment was virtually unchanged 
between January and February; in most 
previous years it has increased during this 
period. The February estimate of 467,000 
was 78,000 lower than a year earlier, almost 
all of the decrease being among men. 

Of the 467,000 unemployed, some 
328,000, or more than two-thirds of the 
total, had been unemployed for three months 
or less. An estimated 89,000 had been 
seeking work for four to six months, and 
50,000 for seven months or more. 

Unemployment rates were lower than a 
year ago in all regions. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Shortage 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 


4 




February 
1064 


February 
1963 


February 
1964 


February 
1963 


February 
1964 


February 
1963 


February 
1964 


February 
1963 




6 
13 
5 

28 


8 
15 

7 
39 


6 
11 

9 
26 


4 
11 

7 
16 












2 








Major Agricultural 








3 


2 












Total 


52 


69 


52 


38 


5 


2 













198 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-FEBRUARY 



— 


SUBSTANTIAL LABOUR 


MODERATE LABOUR 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




SURPLUS 


SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




Calgary 


Halifax 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Edmonton 
Quebec-Levis 


Hamilton 
Montreal 






(labour force 75,000 or more) 


St. John's 
Vancouver-New 

Westminster-Mission City 
Winnipeg 


Ottawa-Hull 

Toronto 

Windsor 








Corner Brook 


— ^NIAGARA PENINSULA 


Guelph 






Cornwall 


Brantford 


Kitchener 






Farnham-Granby 


Kingston 








Fort William-Port Arthur 


London 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 
(labour force 25,000-75,000; 


Joliette 
Lac St. Jean 
Moncton 


Oshawa 
Peterborough 
Saint John 






60 per cent or more in 


New Glasgow 


Sarnia 






non-agricultural activity) 


ROUYN-VAL D'OR -< — 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Sydney 

Trois Rivieres 


Sudbury 

Timmins-Kirkland Lake 
Victoria 
















Charlottetown 


Barrie 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 


Prince Albert 
Riviere du Loup 


Brandon 
Chatham 






AREAS 


Thetford-Lac Megantic- 


Lethbridge 






(labour force 25,000-75.000; 


Ville St. Georges 


Moose Jaw 






40 per cent or more in 


Yorkton 


North Battleford 






agricultural) 




Red Deer 
Regina 

Saskatoon 








Bathurst 


Belleville-Trenton 


Gait 






Beauharnois 


Brampton 


Stratford 






Bracebridge 


Central Vancouver 


Woodstock- 






Bridgewater 


Island 


Tillsonburg 






Campbellton 


Cranbrook 








Chilliwack 


Dawson Creek 








Dauphin 


Drumheller 








Dr ummond v ille 


Fredericton 








Edmundston 


Goderich 








Gaspe 


Kamloops 








Grand Falls 


Lachute-Ste. Therese 








Kent v ille 


Listowel 






MINOR AREAS 


LINDSAY -< 


Medicine Hat 






(labour force 10.000 to 25.000) 


Montmagny 
Newcastle 
Okanagan Valley 
PORTAGE LA -< — 

PRAIRIE 
Quebec North Shore 
Rimouski 

Ste. Agathe-St. Jerome 
St. Stephen 
Sorel 

Summerside 
Truro 
Valleyfield 
Victoriaville 
Woodstock. N.B. 
Yarmouth 


North Bay 
Owen Sound 
Pembroke 
— ^PRINCE GEORGE- 
QUESNEL 
Prince Rupert 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Simcoe 

Swift Current 
St. Hyacinthe 
St. Jean 

ST. THOMAS -< 

Trail-Nelson 

Walkerton 

Weyburn 







• — ^-The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 
moved. For an explanation of the classification used see page 49 1 , June 1 963 issue. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



199 



Women's Bureau 



Socio-Medical Problems of Working Women 

As more and more women combine work outside home with family 
life, their social and medical problems demand special study 



In most countries of the world, with the 
growth of industrialization, more and more 
women at various periods of their lives are 
being employed outside the home. Moreover, 
an increasing proportion of these women, 
especially those who are married, do a 
double job, combining the responsibilities 
of both family and work. 

Although questions associated with the 
use of woman-power are primarily mat- 
ters of labour policy, in the field of occupa- 
tional medicine it is recognized that there 
are health and socio-medical problems in- 
volved in women's employment that require 
special study. 

Many of these problems are associated 
with the strains and stresses arising from 
the combination of the two roles — home 
and work. Others relate to the nature of 
the job, the age of the worker and the con- 
ditions of employment. The purpose of 
studies in such problems is the practical 
one of recommending appropriate measures 
to prevent health hazards among women 
workers and to preserve their health. 

So it was that Dr. Sven Forssman, a 
world-renowned Swedish expert in occupa- 
tional medicine*, was invited to present 
current thinking on the subject at the 14th 
International Congress on Occupational 
Health, held in Madrid in September 1963. 

Miss Mildred Walker, Nursing Consultant 
on Occupational Health in the Department 
of National Health and Welfare, who 
attended the Congress, has made Dr. 
Forssman's paper available to the Women's 
Bureau. 

Physiological aspects — One of Dr. Forss- 
man's basic assumptions was that there is 
a definite difference between men and wo- 
men in respect to maximum working ca- 
pacity. The maximum physical capacity of 
adult women was on the average 25 to 30 
per cent lower than that of men, he said. 
Up to the age of 12 or 13 years, the maxi- 
mum oxygen consumption of boys and 
girls was on the average the same, but in 
adolescence a difference gradually developed. 

There might be a similar difference 
between the sexes in the strength of various 
groups of muscles, partly related to the 
smaller muscular mass of women. Also, 
the speaker pointed out, the total amount 

* Dr. Forssman is President of the Permanent 
Commission and International Association on Occu- 
pational Health. 



of haemoglobin for women was 30 per cent 
less than for men, and haemoglobin in rela- 
tion to body weight was about 20 per cent 
less for women. 

This difference in working capacity had 
influenced legislation in many countries 
where limitations had been placed on per- 
missible loads for women to lift.* In other 
countries, however, women performed 
heavy manual labour. Such variations 
underlined the fact that there was a wide 
range of distribution of physical capacity 
among individuals of both sexes. For 
example, one might find very strong women 
and very weak men. Also, from one age 
group to another, similar variations might 
occur among either men or women. 

In respect to mental capacity, on the 
other hand, Dr. Forssman stressed that 
intelligence tests had revealed no differences 
between men and women. The range 
appeared to be about the same in both 
sexes. 

Moreover the assumption that women 
were better qualified than men for certain 
occupations, such as nursing, or mono- 
tonous work at the assembly line in the 
factory, was without foundation. Factors of 
environment influenced people's attitudes 
toward the role expected of them at work 
and in society as a whole. 

Special medical problems — For women, 
painful menstruation (dysmenorrhoea) 
might cause temporary reduction of working 
capacity and temporary absence from work, 
but its effect tended to be exaggerated. In a 
recent Swedish study, only six per cent of 
all the women examined suffered from 
dysmenorrhoea to the extent that their work- 
ing capacity was affected. The incidence of 
painful menstruation was found to be 
higher among those who were from 14 to 29 
years of age and was considerably reduced 
after a first pregnancy. 

The working woman who is pregnant 
requires special medical attention. A preg- 
nant woman, Dr. Forssman stated, should 
not be employed from four to six weeks 
before the birth of her child nor for at 
least the same period after delivery. Also, 
she should not engage in work that required 
continuous standing. 



t Weights that may be lifted by women workers 
are limited by law in two Canadian provinces, 
British Columbia and Manitoba. 



200 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



He further cited a report from the 
United States that recommended the 
pregnant employee should have a rest 
period of at least 15 minutes during the 
first and second halves of her work shift, 
a mid-shift break long enough to allow for 
some rest and an unhurried meal, and a work 
week not exceeding five days or 40 hours. 

It is essential, too, that pregnant women 
not be exposed to toxic substances that 
might damage the liver or kidneys, or cause 
anaemia. Dr. Forssman also stressed the 
necessity of drastically restricting the ex- 
posure of pregnant women to ionizing 
radiation. 

At the same time, however, apart from 
pregnancy, medical research did not sup- 
port the assumption that women were more 
sensitive to toxic substances than men. Con- 
sequently the same preventive measures 
against occupational hazards of this type 
should be applicable to men and women 
alike. 

Since the manifestations of the meno- 
pause were more emotional and functional 
than physical, the reduction of working 
capacity at this time in a woman's life might 
be almost wholly prevented by health 
counselling, with medical treatment when 
necessary. 

Legislation in many countries forbade the 
employment of women on night shifts or 
underground in mines. There was no 
scientific evidence, however, that women 
should be less resistant than men to shift 
work. Moreover, provided the working 
environment conformed to hygienic stand- 
ards of ventilation and lighting, employ- 
ment underground should not involve 
unique health hazards for women. 

In the case of night work, it was im- 
portant to distinguish between medical and 
social reasons for restrictive legislation. 

Absenteeism — That women had a higher 
absentee rate than men as a result of ill- 
ness had been confirmed by many scientific 
enquiries. Notable among these was a 
recently published study of men and women 
doing similar work in a telephone company 
in the United States. 

Among these employees, whose work 
records had been studied over a period 
i of 20 years, both the average number of 
[ days of absence and the average number of 
absences per individual had been found to 
be higher for women than for men. This 
| study had also shown that women were 
more susceptible to mental and nervous 
disorders, high blood pressure, varicose 
veins, arthritis and rheumatism. On the 
other hand, tuberculosis, asthma, heart con- 
ditions and peptic ulcers had occurred more 
frequently among the men. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 7964 



Dr. Forssman stated that absence not 
certified by doctors and not caused by sick- 
ness usually formed a considerable part of 
the total absence from work among both 
men and women. Two recent Swedish 
studies had shown absence for social rea- 
sons to be considerable, especially among 
married women who had children or other 
obligations at home. 

In a study carried out in Jugoslavia, the 
highest average number of absences had 
been found to be among "women with the 
highest family responsibility." In this con- 
nection, Dr. Forssman pointed out that the 
care of a child of six months takes about 
four hours work a day for a mother. 

He believed that the double burden of 
family obligations and job outside caused 
stress and fatigue that may require medical 
attention and might account at least in part 
for the considerable incidence of nervous 
diseases among women. 

Further, he observed that, although the 
absence of women resulting from illness 
might increase with age, absence for other 
reasons tended to decrease with age, as 
family responsibilities are lessened. 

Preventive aspects — Protection against the 
health hazards of employment — the chief 
purpose of occupational medicine — placed 
high premium on preventive measures. 
Regular and pre-employment health exami- 
nations had been found useful in discover- 
ing the early stages of physical ailments and 
in identifying the effects of psychological 
stress. Occupational health services, there- 
for, were of special value both to women 
workers and their employers. 

With respect to the adjustment of women 
to work, Dr. Forssman strongly advocated 
that they should not be employed in very 
heavy manual labour, and during preg- 
nancy, women should avoid too much stand- 
ing, have several short rest periods during 
the working day, and should not be exposed 
to such occupational hazards as have al- 
ready been mentioned. Apart from these, 
however, the occupational health problems 
of women were not different from those of 
men. 

Finally, Dr. Forssman emphasized the 
need for broader perspective on the physical 
and mental health of women workers and 
the strengthening of their position in 
employment. Further, he was of the 
opinion that the usefulness of women at 
work would be greatly increased through 
more adequate opportunities for education 
and vocational training. 

Part-time work for married women had 
proved very useful, he said, and of special 
value in preventing stress and overloading. 



201 



Older Workers 

Early Returns on Results of Older Worker 
Employment and Training Incentive Program 

In view of experimental nature of program, initial response 
has been good, Minister says, announcing program's results to 
end of January: 1,000 applications received, 700 approved 



Initial response to the federal Govern- 
ment's Older Worker Employment and 
Training Incentive Program had been 
encouraging, in view of the experimental 
nature of the program and the new concepts 
involved, said Hon. Allan J. MacEachen, 
Minister of Labour, when announcing results 
to the end of January. 

Under this program, which went into 
effect on November 1, 1963, the Depart- 
ment of Labour pays 50 per cent of monthly 
wages or $75.00 a month, whichever is 
less, to employers for each eligible older 
worker hired by them for a new job 
between November 1, 1963 and March 31, 
1964. Payments can be made for a total 
period up to 12 months. 

Eligible older workers must be aged 45 
or over and have been unemployed for at 
least six of the previous nine months. 
Local offices of the National Employment 
Service were empowered to receive applica- 
tions and to approve the eligibility of both 
job vacancies and workers. 

By the end of January 1964, approxi- 
mately 1,000 applications had been received 
from employers. About 700 of these met the 
requirements and had been approved. 
About two-thirds of these jobs had been 
filled by January 31 and placements of 
eligible workers were continuing. 

The Minister explained that it had 
become obvious that the number of applica- 
tions received in the first three months of 
the program had been restricted by the 
original limitations governing the qualifica- 
tions for employment of older workers. It 
had later been announced (L.G. Jan., p. 33) 
that the program had been extended to 
March 31, 1964, and the requirement that 
workers, to be eligible, must not be 
entitled to regular unemployment insurance 
benefits was eliminated. Furthermore, em- 
ployers now were required only to give 
the older workers orientation training. 



It was anticipated that the extension of 
time would give employers more time to 
consider fully their manpower requirements 
and make necessary adjustments in their 
employment practices in order to take 
advantage of the program. At the same 
time the changes would render more older 
workers eligible to benefit under the pro- 
visions of the program. 

Mr. MacEachen pointed out in his an- 
nouncement that there had not yet been 
time for the full effect of these changes 
to be felt. From the increasing number of 
enquiries being received by both the 
National Employment Service and the 
Department of Labour it was considered 
that the changes and extension of the hiring 
period had at least partially accomplished 
their objective of encouraging more em- 
ployers to take advantage of the program. 

It had been expected that the program 
would be slow in gaining momentum be- 
cause of the new ideas involved and the 
fact that it was timed to encourage in- 
creased employment during the traditionally 
slacker winter season. 

Reports from local employment offices 
now indicated an increasing number of 
enquiries and applications were being re- 
ceived and further increases were expected 
during February and March. 

In addition to the benefits accruing to 
those older workers who obtained employ- 
ment under the program it was hoped that 
information emerging from its ultimate 
evaluation would be helpful in planning 
future action to assist older workers. 

The Older Worker Employment and 
Training Incentive Program had been 
introduced as a new and experimental 
approach to a continuing problem, with the 
intention of modifying it as more was 
learned of its effects. It was designed to 
assist long-term unemployed older workers 
to return to employment and to gain the 
up-to-date knowledge and experience 
required in today's jobs in modern industry. 



Don't Judge a Man's Worth 
By His Date of Birth 



202 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



Duration of Negotiations, 1963 



During 1963, collective bargaining in 
Canada lead to the conclusion of more than 
200 major agreements in industries outside 
the construction sector. These agreements 
were negotiated for approximately 300,000 
workers in bargaining units of 500 or more 
employees. 

About six out of every ten of the new 
agreements were signed within six months 
from the opening of negotiations, and three 
out of ten were reached in seven to twelve 
months. Negotiations for close to 10 per 
cent of the new contracts extended beyond 
one year. 

More than 60 per cent of the major 
settlements were arrived at without third- 
party assistance. The majority of the remain- 
ing settlements were reached at the con- 
ciliation officer or conciliation board stage, 



or through direct bargaining after comple- 
tion of conciliation proceedings. Some 6 
per cent of the major agreements were con- 
cluded after recourse to arbitration. 

Work stoppages preceded only about 4 
per cent of the major settlements negotiated 
during the year. Strikes over issues in 
dispute occurred at Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber and Standard Tube & T. I. in 
Ontario, and at David & Frere, Dominion 
Rubber, Quebec Iron and Titanium, Regent 
Knitting Mills and Shawinigan Chemicals in 
Quebec. 

In two other contract disputes, strikes 
were called against firms belonging to the 
Montreal Hat and Cap Manufacturers' 
Association, and by longshoremen in the 
ports of Montreal, Quebec and Trois 
Rivieres. 



NEGOTIATIONS PRECEDING SETTLEMENTS REACHED DURING 1963 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more employees concluded between January 1 and December 31, 1963 
exclusive of agreements in the construction industry. 



Stage at Which 
Settled 


Duration of Negotiations in Months 


3 or less 


4-6 


7-9 


10-12 


13 or over 


Total 




Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 




56 
2 

1 


91,210 

9,000 

500 


42 
8 
4 

7 
2 
3 


52,690 
6,100 
4,020 

9,350 
2,230 
3,200 


20 
14 
6 

4 
2 

1 


25,950 
12,100 
9,000 

2,930 

3,130 

530 


7 
4 
3 


11,230 
3,950 
7,400 


5 
3 
2 

4 
4 
2 


4,150 
1,680 
1,100 

18,600 
6,750 
6,000 


130 
31 
16 

15 
12 
9 


185,230 


Conciliation officer 

Conciliation board 

Post-conciliation 


32,830 
22,020 

30,880 








4 
2 


3,600 
2,150 


15,710 


Work stoppage 


1 


500 


12,380 






Total 


60 


101,210 


66 


77,590 


47 


53,640 


20 


28,330 


20 


38,280 


213 


299,050 







This review is prepared by the Collective Bargaining Section, Labour-Management 
Division, of the Economics and Research Branch. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



203 



Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During March, April and May 

(except those under negotiation in February) 

Company and Location Union 

Aluminum Co. of Canada, Arvida, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Aluminum Co. of Canada, He Maligne, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Aluminum Co. of Canada, Kingston, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Anslo-Nfld. Development Co., Grand Falls, 

Nfld Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Anglo-Nfld. Development, Bowater's Nfld. Pulp 

& Paper, Nfld. Contractors' Assn., Nfld Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) (loggers) 

Bakeries (various), Greater Vancouver, B.C Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Breweries (various), Winnipeg, Man Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Burns & Co. (Eastern), Kitchener, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Cdn. Celanese, Drummondville, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNR, system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

CPR, system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) (dining car staff) 

Cdn. Westinghouse, Hamilton, Ont UE (Ind.) 

Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ont. CLC-chartered local 

Dominion Stores, Hamilton & other centres, Ont. Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar Pulp & Paper (Howard Smith Paper 

Div.), Cornwall, Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar Pulp & Paper, East Angus, Que. Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Domtar Pulp & Paper (Kraft & Boxboard Div.), 

Windsor, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

E. B. Eddy, Hull, Que Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Gaspesia woods contractors, Chandler, Que. Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Halifax Shipyards (Dosco), Halifax & Dart- 
mouth, N.S. Marine Wkrs. (CLC) 

Imperial Tobacco & subsidiaries, Ont. & Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kimberly-Clark Paper, Terrace Bay, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & 

IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lever Bros., Toronto, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario-Minnesota Paper, Fort Frances & 
Kenora, Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

N. M. Paterson & Sons, Ont. & Que Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Power Super Markets, Hamilton, Oshawa & 

Toronto, Ont Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Provincial Paper, Thorold, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(inside empl.) 
Rolland Paper, Mont Rolland & St. Jerome, Que. Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Que Bldg. Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Safeway, Shop-Easy & others, Victoria, Van- 
couver & New Westminster, B.C Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Shawinigan Water & Power, province-wide, Que. Public Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 
Spruce Falls & Kimberly-Clark, Kapuskasing, 

Ont Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Tamper Limited, Lachine, Que I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During February 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Assn. Patronale des Inst. Religieuses, (5 hos- 
pitals), St. Hyacinthe & other centres, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Assn. Patronale des Mfrs. de Chaussures, Quebec, 

Que Leather & Shoe Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Assn. Patronale du Commerce (Hardware), 

Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers, garages (various), Vancouver, B.C. Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

204 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 



Company and Location Union 

Automatic Electric, Brockville, Ont IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Telephone B.C. Telephone Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Burns & Co. (6 plants), western Canada Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Packers (8 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. General Electric, Cobourg & Oakville, Ont. IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Montreal & Quebec, Que. IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Cdn. International Paper (Gatineau Woods Div.), 

Que. Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 

CIO/CLC) 
Cdn. International Paper (St. Maurice Woods 

Div.), Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

CNR, system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Cdn. Vickers (Engineering Div.), Montreal, Que. Boilermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Machinists 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Cdn. Vickers, Montreal, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Cascapedia Mfg. & Trading, Gaspe Peninsula, 

Que Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Cluett Peabody, Kitchener & Stratford, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting, Trail, Kimber- 

ley, Riondel & Salmo, B.C Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Davie Shipbuilding, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

G. T. Davie & Sons, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Dominion Corset, Quebec, Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Dominion Engineering, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar Newsprint, Dolbeau, Que Bush Wkrs., Farmers' Union (Ind.) 

Dupuis Freres, Montreal, Que. Commerce & Office Empl. (CNTU) 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Fisheries Assn. & cold storage cos., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) & Native Brother- 
hood (Ind.) (shore wkrs.) 

Fisheries Assn., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) (tendermen) 

Food stores (various), Vancouver, Victoria & 

New Westminster, B.C Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Glove Mfrs. Assn., Loretteville, Montreal, St. 

Raymond & St. Tite, Que Clothing Workers' Federation (CNTU) 

Hollinger Gold Mines, Timmins, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (10), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

International Nickel, Thompson, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kelly, Douglas & Co., Vancouver & other centres, 

B.C Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Legrade Inc. & Eastern Abattoirs, Montreal & 

Quebec, Que Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Rolling Mill, Selkirk, Man Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical & 

maintenance empl.) 

Marine Industries, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel., province-wide, N.S IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Miramichi River ports shippers, N.B Miramichi Trades & Labour (Ind.) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Northern Electric, London, Ont Empl. Assn., (Ind.) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Philips Electronics, Leaside, Ont IBEW (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(outside empl.) 
Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission, Montreal & 

other centres, Que. Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

RCA Victor, Montreal, Que IUE (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ready-mix concrete companies, Toronto, Ont. ... Teamsters (Ind.) 

Regina General Hospital, Regina, Sask Public Empl. (CLC) 

Swift Cdn. (6 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Metro., Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto Metro., Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. ... Public Empl. (CLC) 

Winnipeg Metro., Man Public Empl. (CLC) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • MARCH 1964 205 



Conciliation Officer 

Company and Location Union 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

CBC, company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL- 

CIO/CLC) 
Cdn. General Electric, Guelph, Peterborough & 

Toronto, Ont UE (Ind.} 

Cdn. Steel Foundries, Montreal, Que Steel & Foundry Wkrs. (In